Sheet Metal Worker CV example

Are you looking for your next position as a sheet metal worker?

Then you need to know how to craft an engaging application that showcases your unique skill set and grabs the recruiter’s attention.

But if you need a little guidance, you’re in the right place. Below, we’ve created a blueprint for an impressive CV, packed with top tips and complete with a sheet metal worker CV example.

 

 

 

Sheet Metal Worker CV example

Sheet Metal Worker CV 1

 

This CV example showcases the optimal structure and format for your Sheet Metal Worker CV, providing a pleasant reading experience for busy recruiters.

It also demonstrates the skills, experience and qualifications you should emphasize in your own CV to increase your chances of landing job interviews.

 

CV builder

 

Sheet Metal Worker CV format and structure

In today’s fast-paced job market, recruiters and employers are often short on time. If they can’t locate the information they’re searching for within a few seconds, it could result in them overlooking your application.

To avoid this happening, it’s critical to structure and format your CV in a way that allows them to quickly identify your key skills and offerings, even when they’re pressed for time.

 

How to write a CV

 

Tips for formatting your Sheet Metal Worker CV

  • Length: Two sides of A4 makes for the perfect CV length, though one page is okay for less experienced applicants. This forces you to make sure that every single sentence adds value to your CV and ensures you avoid unnecessary  info.
  • Readability: Columns, lists, bullet points, bold text and subtle colour can all help to aid the readability of your CV. Your overarching goal should be to make the content as easy to read and navigate as possible, whilst also aiming to make your key skills and achievements stand out.
  • Design & format: While it’s important that your CV design looks good, it also needs to be functional (which means easy for recruiters to read) Keep the design simple to achieve a good balance between looking good and reading well.
  • Photos: You can add a profile photo to your CV, if you want to add some personality to it, but they are not a requirement the UK, so you don’t have to.

 

Quick tip: Creating a professional CV style can be difficult and time-consuming when using Microsoft Word or Google Docs. To create a winning CV quickly, try our quick-and-easy CV Builder and use one of their eye-catching professional CV templates.

 

CV formatting tips

 

 

CV structure

To make it easy for busy recruiters and hiring managers to digest your CV, divide the content into several key sections when writing it:

  • Contact details: Always list your contact details at the very top to avoid them being missed.
  • Profile: Start with an introductory paragraph that catches recruiters’ attention and summarises your offerings.
  • Work experience/career history: List your relevant work experience in reverse chronological order, starting with your current position.
  • Education: Provide a concise summary of your education and qualifications.
  • Interests and hobbies: You can include an optional section to showcase any hobbies that demonstrate transferable skills.

Now you understand the basic layout of a CV, here’s what you should include in each section of yours.

 

Contact Details

Contact details

 

Start off your CV with a basic list of your contact details.
Here’s what you should include:

  • Mobile number
  • Email address – It’s often helpful to make a new email address, specifically for your job applications.
  • Location – Share your town or city; there’s no need for a full address.
  • LinkedIn profile or portfolio URL – Make sure the information on them is coherent with your CV, and that they’re up-to-date

Quick tip: Delete excessive details, such as your date of birth or marital status. Recruiters don’t need to know this much about you, so it’s best to save the space for your other CV sections.

 

Sheet Metal Worker CV Profile

Grab the reader’s attention by kick-starting your CV with a powerful profile (or personal statement, if you’re a junior applicant).

This is a short introduction paragraph which summarises your skills, knowledge and experience.

It should paint you as the perfect match for the job description and entice recruiters to read through the rest of your CV.

 

CV profile

 

How to write a good CV profile:

  • Make it short and sharp: It might be tempting to submit a page-long CV profile, but recruiters won’t have the time to read it. To ensure every word gets read, it’s best to include high-level information only; sticking to a length of 3-5 lines.
  • Tailor it: Recruiters can spot a generic, mass-produced CV at a glance – and they certainly won’t be impressed! Before you write your profile (and CV as a whole), read through the job advert and make a list of any skills, knowledge and experience required. You should then incorporate your findings throughout your profile and the rest of your CV.
  • Don’t add an objective: You only have a small space for your CV profile, so avoid writing down your career goals or objectives. If you think these will help your application, incorporate them into your cover letter instead.
  • Avoid generic phrases: Clichés like “blue-sky thinker with a go-getter attitude” might sound impressive to you, but they don’t actually tell the recruiter much about you. Concentrate on highlighting hard facts and skills, as recruiters are more likely to take these on board.

 

Example CV profile for Sheet Metal Worker

A meticulous and skilled Sheet Metal Worker with over 6 years hands-on experience in precision fabrication, metal shaping, and structural assembly. Proficient in interpreting complex blueprints and technical drawings, utilising a wide array of metalworking tools and machinery. Demonstrated ability to meet tight deadlines with an NVQ Level 5 Certification. Adept at collaborating with multidisciplinary teams to achieve project objectives, with a track record of delivering top-quality products and components.

 

What to include in your Sheet Metal Worker CV profile?

  • Experience overview: To give employers an idea of your capabilities, show them your track record by giving an overview of the types of companies you have worked for in the past and the roles you have carried out for previous employers – but keep it high level and save the details for your experience section.
  • Targeted skills: Ensure that your profile highlights your key skills that are most relevant to your Sheet Metal Worker, and tailor them to match the specific job you are applying for. To do this, refer to the job description to closely align your skills with their requirements.
  • Important qualifications: If the jobs you are applying to require candidates to have certain qualifications, then you must add them in your profile to ensure they are seen by hiring managers.

 

Quick tip: If you are finding it difficult to write an attention-grabbing CV profile, choose from hundreds of pre-written profiles across all industries, and add one to your CV with one click in our quick-and-easy CV Builder. All profiles are written by recruitment experts and easily tailored to suit your unique skillset.

 

Core skills section

Add a core skills section below your profile to draw attention to your most applicable skills and make them stand out to readers.

This should consist of 2-3 columns of bullet points that emphasise your relevant skills.

Before creating this section, review the job description and compile a list of any specific skills, specializations, or knowledge needed. Incorporate these findings into your list to portray yourself as the ideal candidate for the position.

 

Core skills section CV

 

Important skills for your Sheet Metal Worker CV

Metal Fabrication – Cutting, shaping, and assembling various types of metal sheets and plates using tools like shears, saws, and presses.

Blueprint Reading – Interpreting and understanding engineering drawings and blueprints, which guide the fabrication and assembly of metal components.

Welding – Using various welding techniques, including MIG (Metal Inert Gas), TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas), and arc welding, to join metal pieces together securely.

Sheet Metal Layout – Laying out patterns and templates on metal sheets, marking cutting lines, and calculating measurements accurately.

Metal Cutting – Cutting metal sheets to precise dimensions using tools such as power shears, plasma cutters, and laser cutting machines.

Metal Bending and Forming – Bending and shaping metal sheets and plates using brakes, rollers, and other forming equipment to create desired shapes and angles.

Use of Hand and Power Tools – Operating a wide range of hand and power tools, including drills, grinders, hammers, and riveters, for various metalworking tasks.

Metal Finishing – Utilising knowledge of finishing techniques, such as grinding, deburring, and polishing, to ensure the smoothness and quality of metal surfaces.

Safety Compliance – Adhering to safety protocols and regulations to minimise workplace accidents and ensure the well-being of oneself and colleagues.

Material Knowledge – Maintaining familiarity with different types of metals, their properties, and applications, as well as selecting the appropriate materials for specific projects.

 

Quick tip: Our quick-and-easy CV Builder has thousands of in-demand skills for all industries and professions, that can be added to your CV in seconds – This will save you time and ensure you get noticed by recruiters.

 

CV builder

 

Work experience

Next up is your work experience section, which is normally the longest part of your CV.

Start with your current (or most recent) job and work your way backwards through your experience.

Can’t fit all your roles? Allow more space for your recent career history and shorten down descriptions for your older roles.

 
Work experience
 

Structuring each job

The structure of your work experience section can seriously affect its impact.

This is generally the biggest section of a CV, and with no thought to structure, it can look bulky and important information can get lost.

Use my 3-step structure below to allow for easy navigation, so employers can find what they are looking for:

 
Role descriptions
 

Outline

Start with a 1-2 sentence summary of your role as a whole, detailing what the goal of your position was, who you reported to or managed, and the type of organisation you worked for.

 

Key responsibilities

Follow with a snappy list of bullet points, detailing your daily duties and responsibilities.

Tailor it to the role you’re applying for by mentioning how you put the target employer’s desired hard skills and knowledge to use in this role.

 

Key achievements

Round up each role by listing 1-3 key achievements, accomplishments or results.

Wherever possible, quantify them using hard facts and figures, as this really helps to prove your value.

 

Sample job description for Sheet Metal Worker CV

Outline

Contribute to the production of custom metal components for a leading commercial construction company in Birmingham, utilising advanced fabrication techniques and machinery.

Key Responsibilities

  • Interpret detailed blueprints, CAD drawings, and technical specifications
  • Operate CNC laser cutters and press brakes to shape and form metal
  • Utilise MIG and TIG welding techniques to join metal parts according to specifications
  • Conduct thorough quality control inspections to identify defects

 

Quick tip: Create impressive job descriptions easily in our quick-and-easy CV Builder by adding pre-written job phrases for every industry and career stage.

 

 

Education section

At the bottom of your CV is your full education section. You can list your formal academic qualifications, such as:

  • Degree
  • GCSE’s
  • A levels

As well as any specific Sheet Metal Worker qualifications that are essential to the jobs you are applying for. Note down the name of the qualification, the organisation at which you studied, and the date of completion.

 

Hobbies and interests

Although this is an optional section, it can be useful if your hobbies and interests will add further depth to your CV.

Interests which are related to the sector you are applying to, or which show transferable skills like leadership or teamwork, can worth listing.

On the other hand, generic hobbies like “going out with friends” won’t add any value to your application, so are best left off your CV.

 

CV builder

A strong, compelling CV is essential to get noticed and land interviews with the best employers.

To ensure your CV stands out from the competition, make sure to tailor it to your target role and pack it with sector-specific skills and results.

Remember to triple-check for spelling and grammar errors before hitting send.

Good luck with the job search!