Security Controls Engineer CV example

You can implement and monitor security controls and help to protect the company’s from malicious behaviour and indivisuals.

That’s pretty impressive stuff.

But as security and privacy are such a big responsibility for businesses, you need to prove this to employers with a detailed application.

If it’s been a while since you last wrote a CV, let us help. Check out our expert advice and security controls engineer CV example below.

 

 

 

Security Controls Engineer CV example

Security Controls Engineer CV 1

Security Controls Engineer CV 2

 

This is a good example of a Security Controls Engineer CV which is professionally formatted, and structured in a way that allows recruiters to easily find and understand the candidate’s key selling points.

Take some time to look at this CV and refer to it throughout the writing of your own CV for best results.

 

CV builder

 

Security Controls Engineer CV format and structure

In today’s fast-paced job market, recruiters and employers are often short on time. If they can’t locate the information they’re searching for within a few seconds, it could result in them overlooking your application.

To avoid this happening, it’s critical to structure and format your CV in a way that allows them to quickly identify your key skills and offerings, even when they’re pressed for time.

 

How to write a CV

 

Tips for formatting your Security Controls Engineer CV

  • Length: Two sides of A4 makes for the perfect CV length, though one page is okay for less experienced applicants. This forces you to make sure that every single sentence adds value to your CV and ensures you avoid unnecessary  info.
  • Readability: Recruiters appreciate CVs that they can quickly scan through without trouble. Ensure yours makes the cut by formatting your headings for attention (bold or coloured fonts should do the trick) and breaking up long paragraphs into smaller chunks or short, snappy bullet points.
  • Design & format: While it’s okay to add your own spin to your CV, avoid overdoing the design. If you go for something elaborate, you might end up frustrating recruiters who, above anything, value simplicity and clarity.
  • Photos: You can add a profile photo to your CV, if you want to add some personality to it, but they are not a requirement the UK, so you don’t have to.

 

Quick tip: Creating a professional CV style can be difficult and time-consuming when using Microsoft Word or Google Docs. To create a winning CV quickly, try our quick-and-easy CV Builder and use one of their eye-catching professional CV templates.

 

CV formatting tips

 

 

CV structure

When writing your CV, it’s important to structure the content into the following key sections to ensure easy digestion by busy recruiters and hiring managers:

  • Contact details: List your contact details at the top of your CV to prevent them from being overlooked.
  • Profile: Begin with an introductory paragraph that captures recruiters’ attention and summarises what you have to offer employers.
  • Work experience/career history: List your relevant work experience in reverse chronological order, starting with your current position.
  • Education: Provide a brief summary of your education and qualifications.
  • Interests and hobbies: An optional section to showcase any hobbies that highlight transferable skills relevant to your target jobs.

Now you understand the basic layout of a CV, here’s what you should include in each section of yours.

 

Contact Details

Contact details

 

Begin by sharing your contact details, so it’s easy for employers to give you a call.
Keep to the basics, such as:

  • Mobile number
  • Email address – It should sound professional, with no slang or nicknames. Make a new one for your job applications if necessary.
  • Location – Simply share your vague location, for example ‘Manchester’, rather than a full address.
  • LinkedIn profile or portfolio URL – Remember to update them before you send your application.

 

Security Controls Engineer CV Profile

Your CV profile is basically a short introductory paragraph, which summarises your key selling points and highlights why you’d make a good hire.

So, write a well-rounded summary of what you do, what your key skills are, and what relevant experience you have.

It needs to be short, snappy and punchy and, ultimately, entice the reader to read the rest of your CV.

 

CV profile

 

How to write a good CV profile:

  • Make it short and sharp: When it comes to CV profile length, less is more, as recruiters are often time-strapped. Aim for around of 3-5 persuasive lines.
  • Tailor it: If recruiters don’t see your suitability within a few seconds, they may close your CV straight away. Your CV profile should closely match the essential requirements listed in the job ad, so make sure to review them before you write it.
  • Don’t add an objective: Avoid discussing your career goals in your CV profile – if you think they’re necessary, briefly mention them in your cover letter instead.
  • Avoid generic phrases: Clichés like “blue-sky thinker with a go-getter attitude” might sound impressive to you, but they don’t actually tell the recruiter much about you. Concentrate on highlighting hard facts and skills, as recruiters are more likely to take these on board.

 

Example CV profile for Security Controls Engineer

Dedicated Control Engineer with 9+ years of experience in designing, installing, configuring, and preserving security systems in commercial and residential buildings. Adept at thoroughly testing hardware and software to confirm that they operate as intended. Proven ability to provide clients with documentation and reports on incidents and resolutions.

 

What to include in your Security Controls Engineer CV profile?

  • Experience overview: Start with a brief summary of your relevant experience so far. How many years experience do you have? What type of companies have you worked for? What industries/sectors have you worked in? What are your specialisms?
  • Targeted skills: Ensure that your profile highlights your key skills that are most relevant to your Security Controls Engineer, and tailor them to match the specific job you are applying for. To do this, refer to the job description to closely align your skills with their requirements.
  • Important qualifications: If the job postings require specific qualifications, it is essential to incorporate them in your profile to ensure visibility to hiring managers.

 

Quick tip: If you are finding it difficult to write an attention-grabbing CV profile, choose from hundreds of pre-written profiles across all industries, and add one to your CV with one click in our quick-and-easy CV Builder. All profiles are written by recruitment experts and easily tailored to suit your unique skillset.

 

Core skills section

Underneath your profile, write a core skills section to make your most relevant skills jump off the page at readers.

It should be made up of 2-3 columns of bullet points of your relevant skills.

Before you do this, look over the job description and make a list of any specific skills, specialisms or knowledge required.

Then, make sure to use your findings in your list. This will paint you as the perfect match for the role.

 

Core skills section CV

 

Important skills for your Security Controls Engineer CV

CCTV System Installation and Maintenance – Installing, configuring, and maintaining CCTV systems, including IP and analogue cameras.

Access Control Systems – Implementing and managing electronic access control systems, such as card readers, biometric scanners, and keypad entry systems.

Alarm Systems – Installing and servicing various types of alarm systems, including intruder alarms, fire alarms, and perimeter security systems.

Network Configuration – Setting up and configuring networks for security systems, including knowledge of TCP/IP, routers, switches, and firewalls.

Security System Integration – Integrating various security systems (CCTV, access control, alarms) to work together seamlessly.

Software Programming – Programming and configuring security system software to meet specific security needs and requirements.

Troubleshooting and Repair – Diagnosing and fixing issues with security systems, including hardware and software troubleshooting.

Surveillance Legislation Knowledge – Understanding UK surveillance laws and regulations to ensure compliance in CCTV and security system installation.

Physical Security Principles – Maintaining knowledge of physical security principles and best practices to enhance overall security infrastructure.

Technical Documentation – Creating and maintaining technical documentation, including system configurations, installation procedures, and user manuals.

 

Quick tip: Our quick-and-easy CV Builder has thousands of in-demand skills for all industries and professions, that can be added to your CV in seconds – This will save you time and ensure you get noticed by recruiters.

 

CV builder

 

Work experience

Next up is your work experience section, which is normally the longest part of your CV.

Start with your current (or most recent) job and work your way backwards through your experience.

Can’t fit all your roles? Allow more space for your recent career history and shorten down descriptions for your older roles.

 
Work experience
 

Structuring each job

Recruiters will be keen to gain a better idea of where you’ve worked and how you apply your skill-set in the workplace.

However, if they’re faced with huge, hard-to-read paragraphs, they may just gloss over it and move onto the next application.

To avoid this, use the simple 3-step role structure, as shown below:

 
Role descriptions
 

Outline

Provide a brief overview of the job as a whole, such as what the overriding purpose of your job was and what type of company you worked for.

 

Key responsibilities

Next, write up a punchy list of your daily duties and responsibilities, using bullet points.

Wherever you can, point out how you put your hard skills and knowledge to use – especially skills which are applicable to your target role.

 

Key achievements

Round up each role by listing 1-3 key achievements, accomplishments or results.

Wherever possible, quantify them using hard facts and figures, as this really helps to prove your value.

 

Sample job description for Security Controls Engineer CV

Outline

Implement equipment that restricts and manages entry to specific areas, for a company that provides a broad range of security solutions which enhance the quality of life of clients and employees.

Key Responsibilities

  • Model connected and wireless access regulation components based on client requirements and regulatory compliance standards.
  • Embed CCTV and intrusion detection units, card readers, magnetic locks, pin codes, biometric scanners, electronic locks, and intercom appliances in a professional manner.
  • Calibrate software and hardware to create user profiles, define permissions, and set up alarm and notification protocols.
  • Regularly inspect constituents, resolve technical issues, replace faulty parts, and update programmes.

 

Quick tip: Create impressive job descriptions easily in our quick-and-easy CV Builder by adding pre-written job phrases for every industry and career stage.

 

 

Education section

Although there should be mentions of your highest and most relevant qualifications earlier on in your CV, save your exhaustive list of qualifications for the bottom.

If you’re an experienced candidate, simply include the qualifications that are highly relevant to Security Controls Engineer roles.

However, less experienced candidates can provide a more thorough list of qualifications, including A-Levels and GCSEs.

You can also dedicate more space to your degree, discussing relevant exams, assignments and modules in more detail, if your target employers consider them to be important.

 

Hobbies and interests

This section is entirely optional, so you’ll have to use your own judgement to figure out if it’s worth including.

If your hobbies and interests could make you appear more suitable for your dream job, then they are definitely worth adding.

Interests which are related to the industry, or hobbies like sports teams or volunteering, which display valuable transferable skills might be worth including.

 

CV builder

 

A strong, compelling CV is essential to get noticed and land interviews with the best employers.

To ensure your CV stands out from the competition, make sure to tailor it to your target role and pack it with sector-specific skills and results.

Remember to triple-check for spelling and grammar errors before hitting send.

Good luck with the job search!