Journalism Graduate CV example

You might have spent the last three years getting to grips with your writing style and trying out different types of journalism, but writing a CV is a very different ball game.

So, if you’re a recent graduate ready to get your name out there, we can help you to get started.

Check out our step-by-step guide and journalism graduate CV example below to help you craft an application worthy of a Pulitzer Prize.

 

 

 

Journalism Graduate CV example

Journalism Graduate CV 1

Journalism Graduate CV 2

 

This CV example illustrates the ideal structure and format for your Journalism Graduate CV, making it easy for busy hiring managers to quickly identify your suitability for the jobs you’re applying for,

It also gives some guidance on the skills, experience and qualifications you should emphasise in your own CV.

 

CV builder

 

Journalism Graduate CV format and structure

Your CV is the first impression you’ll make on anybody who reads it.

A disorganised, cluttered and barely-readable CV could seriously decrease your chances of landing interviews, so it’s essential to make sure yours is slick, professional and easy to navigate.

You can do this by using a clear structure and formatting your content with some savvy formatting techniques – check them out below:

 

How to write a CV

 

Tips for formatting your Journalism Graduate CV

  • Length: Recruiters will be immediately put off by lengthy CVs – with hundreds of applications to read through, they simply don’t have the time! Grabbing their attention with a short, snappy and highly relevant CV is far more likely to lead to success. Aim for two sides of A4 or less.
  • Readability: To help busy recruiters scan through your CV, make sure your section headings stand out – bold or coloured text works well. Additionally, try to use bullet points wherever you can, as they’re far easier to skim through than huge paragraphs. Lastly, don’t be afraid of white space on your CV – a little breathing space is great for readability.
  • Design & format: While it’s okay to add your own spin to your CV, avoid overdoing the design. If you go for something elaborate, you might end up frustrating recruiters who, above anything, value simplicity and clarity.
  • Photos: You can add a profile photo to your CV, if you want to add some personality to it, but they are not a requirement the UK, so you don’t have to.

 

Quick tip: Creating a professional CV style can be difficult and time-consuming when using Microsoft Word or Google Docs. To create a winning CV quickly, try our quick-and-easy CV Builder and use one of their eye-catching professional CV templates.

 

CV formatting tips

 

 

CV structure

As you write your CV, work to the simple but effective structure below:

  • Name and contact details – Pop them at the top of your CV, so it’s easy for recruiters to contact you.
  • CV profile – Write a snappy overview of what makes you a good fit for the role; discussing your key experience, skills and accomplishments.
  • Core skills section – Add a short but snappy list of your relevant skills and knowledge.
  • Work experience – A list of your relevant work experience, starting with your current role.
  • Education – A summary of your relevant qualifications and professional/vocational training.
  • Hobbies and interests – An optional sections, which you could use to write a short description of any relevant hobbies or interests.

Now you understand the basic layout of a CV, here’s what you should include in each section of yours.

 

Contact Details

Contact details

 

Make it easy for recruiters to get in touch, by heading your CV with your contact details.

There’s no need for excessive details – just list the basics:

  • Mobile number
  • Email address – Use a professional address with no nicknames.
  • Location – Just write your general location, such as ‘London’ or ‘Cardiff’ – there’s no need to put your full address.
  • LinkedIn profile or portfolio URL

 

Journalism Graduate CV Profile

Recruiters read through countless applications every day.

If they don’t find what they’re looking for quickly, they’ll simply move onto the next one.

That’s what makes your CV profile (or personal statement, if you’re an entry-level/graduate candidate) so important.

This short and snappy summary sits at the top of your CV, and should give a high-level overview of why you’re a good match for the job.

This way, you can ensure that busy recruiters see your suitability from the outset, and so, feel your CV is worth their time.

 

CV profile

 

How to write a good CV profile:

  • Make it short and sharp: When it comes to CV profile length, less is more, as recruiters are often time-strapped. Aim for around of 3-5 persuasive lines.
  • Tailor it: The biggest CV mistake? A generic, mass-produced document which is sent out to tens of employers. If you want to land an interview, you need to tailor your CV profile (and your application as a whole) to the specific roles you’re applying for. So, before you start writing, remember to read over those job descriptions and make a list of the skills, knowledge and experience the employers are looking for.
  • Don’t add an objective: Avoid discussing your career goals in your CV profile – if you think they’re necessary, briefly mention them in your cover letter instead.
  • Avoid generic phrases: Cheesy clichès and generic phrases won’t impress recruiters, who read the same statements several times per day. Impress them with your skill-set, experience and accomplishments instead!

 

Example CV profile for Journalism Graduate

Tenacious Journalism Graduate with 3 years of success in crafting captivating and well-documented investigative reports that adhere to appropriate style guidelines. Understanding of digital/social platforms for dissemination of reports. Proven ability to work under pressure and meet tight deadlines. Adept at mitigating risks and navigating legal challenges, such as safeguarding vulnerable individuals and respecting their privacy. Focused on upholding high standards of integrity by following industry codes of conduct and organisational guidelines.

 

What to include in your Journalism Graduate CV profile?

  • Experience overview: Recruiters will want to know what type of companies you’ve worked for, industries you have knowledge of, and the type of work you’ve carried out in the past, so give them a summary of this in your profile.
  • Targeted skills: Ensure that your profile highlights your key skills that are most relevant to your Journalism Graduate, and tailor them to match the specific job you are applying for. To do this, refer to the job description to closely align your skills with their requirements.
  • Important qualifications: If the jobs you are applying to require candidates to have certain qualifications, then you must add them in your profile to ensure they are seen by hiring managers.

 

Quick tip: If you are finding it difficult to write an attention-grabbing CV profile, choose from hundreds of pre-written profiles across all industries, and add one to your CV with one click in our quick-and-easy CV Builder. All profiles are written by recruitment experts and easily tailored to suit your unique skillset.

 

Core skills section

Add a core skills section below your profile to draw attention to your most applicable skills and make them stand out to readers.

This should consist of 2-3 columns of bullet points that emphasise your relevant skills.

Before creating this section, review the job description and compile a list of any specific skills, specializations, or knowledge needed. Incorporate these findings into your list to portray yourself as the ideal candidate for the position.

 

Core skills section CV

 

Important skills for your Journalism Graduate CV

News Writing – Crafting news stories that follow journalistic conventions, including accurate reporting, clear writing, and adherence to editorial guidelines.

Investigative Journalism – Conducting in-depth research, interviews, and analysis to uncover and report on important stories with integrity.

Interviewing Techniques – Conducting interviews with various sources, including politicians, experts, and everyday people, to gather information and quotes.

Media Production – Using multimedia production tools and techniques, including video editing, audio recording, and photography, to create compelling multimedia content.

Editing and Proofreading – Editing and proofreading written content for accuracy, clarity, and grammar, ensuring it meets publishing standards.

Data Journalism – Using data analysis tools and techniques to present complex information in an accessible and visual format.

Digital Content Management – Using content management systems (CMS) to publish and manage content on websites and digital platforms.

Social Media Management – Using social media platforms for journalism, including sharing news updates, engaging with the audience, and promoting content.

Ethical Journalism – Understanding journalistic ethics and codes of conduct, including objectivity, impartiality, and the responsible handling of sensitive information.

Media Law and Regulation – Maintaining knowledge of media laws, defamation, privacy, and intellectual property rights, to ensure compliance and protect the publication from legal issues.

 

Quick tip: Our quick-and-easy CV Builder has thousands of in-demand skills for all industries and professions, that can be added to your CV in seconds – This will save you time and ensure you get noticed by recruiters.

 

CV builder

 

Work experience

Next up is your work experience section, which is normally the longest part of your CV.

Start with your current (or most recent) job and work your way backwards through your experience.

Can’t fit all your roles? Allow more space for your recent career history and shorten down descriptions for your older roles.

 

CV work experience

 

Structuring each job

Recruiters will be keen to gain a better idea of where you’ve worked and how you apply your skill-set in the workplace.

However, if they’re faced with huge, hard-to-read paragraphs, they may just gloss over it and move onto the next application.

To avoid this, use the simple 3-step role structure, as shown below:

 

Role descriptions

 

Outline

Begin with a summary of your role, detailing what the purpose of your job was, who you reported to and what size of team you were part of (or led).

 

Key responsibilities

Using easy-to-read bullet points, note down your day-to-day responsibilities in the role.

Make sure to showcase how you used your hard sector skills and knowledge.

 

Key achievements

Lastly, add impact by highlight 1-3 key achievements that you made within the role.

Struggling to think of an achievement? If it had a positive impact on your company, it counts.

For example, you might increased company profits, improved processes, or something simpler, such as going above and beyond to solve a customer’s problem.

 

Sample job description for Journalism Graduate CV

Outline

Participate in research, uncovering hidden information, and reporting on issues of public interest, for a renowned British newspaper that has a dedicated team known for revealing government misconduct, corporate malpractice, and social injustices.

Key Responsibilities

  • Conduct thorough research on a various subject, including political, social, economic, and environmental matters.
  • Develop sources, gather data, and access records to build a strong foundation for exposés.
  • Utilise analysis tools and methodologies to examine large datasets for patterns, anomalies, and insights.
  • Carry out detailed interviews with whistle-blowers, experts, insiders, and individuals who have important information.

 

Quick tip: Create impressive job descriptions easily in our quick-and-easy CV Builder by adding pre-written job phrases for every industry and career stage.

 

 

Education section

Although there should be mentions of your highest and most relevant qualifications earlier on in your CV, save your exhaustive list of qualifications for the bottom.

If you’re an experienced candidate, simply include the qualifications that are highly relevant to Journalism Graduate roles.

However, less experienced candidates can provide a more thorough list of qualifications, including A-Levels and GCSEs.

You can also dedicate more space to your degree, discussing relevant exams, assignments and modules in more detail, if your target employers consider them to be important.

 

Hobbies and interests

Although this is an optional section, it can be useful if your hobbies and interests will add further depth to your CV.

Interests which are related to the sector you are applying to, or which show transferable skills like leadership or teamwork, can worth listing.

On the other hand, generic hobbies like “going out with friends” won’t add any value to your application, so are best left off your CV.

 

CV builder

 

A strong, compelling CV is essential to get noticed and land interviews with the best employers.

To ensure your CV stands out from the competition, make sure to tailor it to your target role and pack it with sector-specific skills and results.

Remember to triple-check for spelling and grammar errors before hitting send.

Good luck with the job search!