Internal Communications Manager CV example

You’ve got a way with words and you know how to get the message just right, so why does writing your own communications CV feel like such a challenge?

Well, the truth is, there’s added pressure when writing a job application because you really want to land the job.

But the good news is, we can help to relieve some of that pressure with our detailed writing guide below, complete with an internal communications manager CV example.

 

 

 

Internal Communications Manager CV example

Internal Communications Manager CV 1

Internal Communications Manager CV 2

 

Unsure of what your Internal Communications Manager CV should look like?

Have a look at the CV example above to get familiar with the structure, layout and format of a professional CV.

As you can see, it provides plenty of relevant information about the applicant but is still very easy to read, and brief – which will please busy recruiters and hiring managers.

 

CV builder

 

Internal Communications Manager CV format and structure

Recruiters and employers are busy, and if they can’t find the information they’re looking for in a few seconds, it could be game over for your application.

You need to format and structure your CV in a way which allows the reader to pick out your key information with ease, even if they’re strapped for time.

It should be clear, easily legible, well-organised and scannable – check out some simple tips and tricks below:

 

How to write a CV

 

Tips for formatting your Internal Communications Manager CV

  • Length: Whether you’ve got one year or three decades of experience, your CV should never be more than two sides of A4. Recruiters are busy people who’re often juggling numerous roles and tasks, so they don’t have time to read lengthy applications. If you’re a recent graduate or don’t have much industry experience, one side of A4 is fine.
  • Readability: To help busy recruiters scan through your CV, make sure your section headings stand out – bold or coloured text works well. Additionally, try to use bullet points wherever you can, as they’re far easier to skim through than huge paragraphs. Lastly, don’t be afraid of white space on your CV – a little breathing space is great for readability.
  • Design & format: When it comes to CV design, it’s best to keep things simple and sleek. While elaborate designs certainly command attention, it’s not always for the right reasons! Readability is key, so whatever you choose to do, make sure you prioritise readability above everything.
  • Photos: Don’t add profile photos to your CV unless you work in an industry or region which prefers to see them. Most employers in the UK will not need to see one.

 

Quick tip: Creating a professional CV style can be difficult and time-consuming when using Microsoft Word or Google Docs. To create a winning CV quickly, try our quick-and-easy CV Builder and use one of their eye-catching professional CV templates.

 

CV formatting tips

 

 

CV structure

When writing your own CV, break up your CV content into the following key sections:

  • Name and contact details – Place them at the top of your CV, so that employers can easily get in touch.
  • CV profile – A punchy sales pitch of your key experience, skills and achievements to reel readers in.
  • Core skills section – A bullet-pointed snapshot of your abilities.
  • Work experience – A well-structured list of your relevant work experience.
  • Education – An overview of any relevant qualifications or professional training you have.
  • Hobbies and interests – A short description of any relevant hobbies or interests (optional).

Now you understand the basic layout of a CV, here’s what you should include in each section of yours.

 

Contact Details

Contact details

 

Kick-start your CV with your contact details, so recruiters can get in touch easily.
Here’s what you should include:

  • Mobile number
  • Email address – Make sure it’s professional, with no silly nicknames.
  • Location – Your town or city is sufficient, rather than a full address.
  • LinkedIn profile or portfolio URL – Ensure they’ve been updated and are looking slick and professional.

Quick tip: Avoid listing your date of birth, marital status or other irrelevant details – they’re unnecessary at this stage.

 

Internal Communications Manager CV Profile

To immediately capture the attention of recruiters, begin your CV with a powerful profile (or personal statement for junior applicants).

This is a brief introductory paragraph that summarises your skills, experience, and knowledge.

It should position you as the ideal candidate for the job and encourage recruiters to read on.

 

CV profile

 

How to write a good CV profile:

  • Make it short and sharp: Aim for a short, snappy paragraph of 3-5 lines. This is just enough room to showcase why you’d make the perfect hire, without going into excessive detail and overwhelming busy recruiters.
  • Tailor it: If recruiters don’t see your suitability within a few seconds, they may close your CV straight away. Your CV profile should closely match the essential requirements listed in the job ad, so make sure to review them before you write it.
  • Don’t add an objective: Leave your career objectives or goals out of your profile. You only have limited space to work with, so they’re best suited to your cover letter.
  • Avoid generic phrases: Clichés like “blue-sky thinker with a go-getter attitude” might sound impressive to you, but they don’t actually tell the recruiter much about you. Concentrate on highlighting hard facts and skills, as recruiters are more likely to take these on board.

 

Example CV profile for Internal Communications Manager

Committed Internal Communications Manager with 10+ years of experience in formulating and implementing strategies to convey information, updates, and messages to workforces within staffing firms. Adept at using survey and feedback tools to gather employee input and measure communication effectiveness. Proven ability to handle response to crises situations which affect organisational perception.

 

What to include in your Internal Communications Manager CV profile?

  • Experience overview: To give employers an idea of your capabilities, show them your track record by giving an overview of the types of companies you have worked for in the past and the roles you have carried out for previous employers – but keep it high level and save the details for your experience section.
  • Targeted skills: Highlight your skills which are most relevant to Internal Communications Manager jobs, to ensure that recruiters see your most in-demand skills as soon as they open your CV.
  • Important qualifications: If the job postings require specific qualifications, it is essential to incorporate them in your profile to ensure visibility to hiring managers.

 

Quick tip: If you are finding it difficult to write an attention-grabbing CV profile, choose from hundreds of pre-written profiles across all industries, and add one to your CV with one click in our quick-and-easy CV Builder. All profiles are written by recruitment experts and easily tailored to suit your unique skillset.

 

Core skills section

Next, you should create a bullet pointed list of your core skills, formatted into 2-3 columns.

Here, you should focus on including the most important skills or knowledge listed in the job advertisement.

This will instantly prove that you’re an ideal candidate, even if a recruiter only has time to briefly scan your CV.

 

Core skills section CV

 

Important skills for your Internal Communications Manager CV

Strategic Communication Planning – Developing comprehensive communication strategies that align with organisational goals and engage employees effectively.

Content Creation and Editing – Creating engaging written, visual, and multimedia content for internal communication channels.

Message Development – Crafting clear and concise messages that convey key information, values, and objectives to employees.

Employee Engagement Programs – Designing and implementing initiatives to boost employee morale, satisfaction, and productivity.

Change Management Communication – Communicating organisational changes, such as mergers or restructuring, to ensure employees understand and adapt to new situations.

Intranet and Digital Tools – Managing and optimizing internal communication platforms, including company intranet and collaboration tools.

Measurement and Analytics – Using metrics and analytics to evaluate the effectiveness of internal communication strategies and make data-driven improvements.

Crisis Communication – Developing and executing communication plans during crises to keep employees informed and mitigate potential harm to the organisation’s reputation.

Stakeholder Management – Building and maintaining relationships with key stakeholders, including senior management, department heads, and employee representatives.

Compliance and Regulatory Knowledge – Ensuring internal communications comply with relevant laws, regulations, and industry standards, especially in highly regulated sectors.

 

Quick tip: Our quick-and-easy CV Builder has thousands of in-demand skills for all industries and professions, that can be added to your CV in seconds – This will save you time and ensure you get noticed by recruiters.

 

CV builder

 

Work experience

Next up is your work experience section, which is normally the longest part of your CV.

Start with your current (or most recent) job and work your way backwards through your experience.

Can’t fit all your roles? Allow more space for your recent career history and shorten down descriptions for your older roles.

 

CV work experience

 

Structuring each job

The structure of your work experience section can seriously affect its impact.

This is generally the biggest section of a CV, and with no thought to structure, it can look bulky and important information can get lost.

Use my 3-step structure below to allow for easy navigation, so employers can find what they are looking for:

 

Role descriptions

 

Outline

Provide a brief overview of the job as a whole, such as what the overriding purpose of your job was and what type of company you worked for.

 

Key responsibilities

Using easy-to-read bullet points, note down your day-to-day responsibilities in the role.

Make sure to showcase how you used your hard sector skills and knowledge.

 

Key achievements

Lastly, add impact by highlight 1-3 key achievements that you made within the role.

Struggling to think of an achievement? If it had a positive impact on your company, it counts.

For example, you might increased company profits, improved processes, or something simpler, such as going above and beyond to solve a customer’s problem.

 

Sample job description for Internal Communications Manager CV

Outline

Ensure the internal communication channels are efficient and align with the goals and culture of a global talent services expert that offers the full spectrum of solutions which meet employers’ and jobseekers’ needs.

Key Responsibilities

  • Devise a comprehensive in-house communication tactics aligned with the company’s objectives and overall values.
  • Craft compelling, clear, and engaging content for emails, newsletters, mobile apps, recognition platforms, LMS, intranet, videos, discussion forums, and presentations.
  • Ensure comms mediums are efficient, user-friendly, and accessible to all personnel.
  • Execute programmes to increase employee involvement and participation in initiatives.

 

Quick tip: Create impressive job descriptions easily in our quick-and-easy CV Builder by adding pre-written job phrases for every industry and career stage.

 

 

Education section

At the bottom of your CV is your full education section. You can list your formal academic qualifications, such as:

  • Degree
  • GCSE’s
  • A levels

As well as any specific Internal Communications Manager qualifications that are essential to the jobs you are applying for. Note down the name of the qualification, the organisation at which you studied, and the date of completion.

 

Hobbies and interests

The hobbies and interests CV section isn’t mandatory, so don’t worry if you’re out of room by this point.

However, if you have an interesting hobby, or an interest that could make you seem more suitable for the role, then certainly think about adding.

Be careful what you include though… Only consider hobbies that exhibit skills that are required for roles as a Internal Communications Manager, or transferable workplace skills.

There is never any need to tell employers that you like to watch TV and eat out.

 

CV builder

 

An interview-winning CV for a Internal Communications Manager role, needs to be both visually pleasing and packed with targeted content.

Whilst it needs to detail your experience, accomplishments and relevant skills, it also needs to be as clear and easy to read as possible.

Remember to research the role and review the job ad before applying, so you’re able to match yourself up to the requirements.

If you follow these guidelines and keep motivated in your job search, you should land an interview in no time.

Best of luck with your next application!