Cyber security CV example

Cyber security CV example

Cyber security is a booming industry, but recruiting managers are faced with a range of applications for every role.

To stand out from the crowd, your cyber security CV needs to highlight technical know-how alongside clear and tangible success.

This guide includes 2 example cyber security CVs and advice to help you write your own effective CV.

 

Guide contents

  • Cyber security CV example
  • Structuring and formatting your CV
  • Writing your CV profile
  • Detailing work experience
  • Your education
  • Skills required for your Cyber security CV

 

Cyber security CV example 1 - Analyst

Cyber Security CV - Analyst 1

 

Cyber Security CV - Analyst 2

 

 

Cyber security CV example 2 - Consultant

cyber security CV - consultant 1

 

cyber security CV - consultant 2

 

Before you start writing your own CV, take a look at the example Cyber security CV above to give yourself a basic understanding of the style and format that recruiters and hiring managers prefer to see.

Also, take note of the type of content that is included to impress recruiters, and how the most relevant information is made prominent.

 

 

Cyber security CV structure & format

Your CV is the very first impression you'll make on a potential employer.

A disorganised, cluttered and barely readable CV could seriously decrease your chances of landing interviews, so it's essential to make sure yours is slick, professional and easy to navigate.

You can do this by employing a clear structure and formatting your content with some savvy formatting techniques - check them out below:

 

CV structure

 

Formatting Tips

  • Length: Recruiters will be immediately put off by lengthy CVs - with hundreds of applications to read through, they simply don't have the time! Grabbing their attention with a short, snappy and highly relevant CV is far more likely to lead to success. Aim for two sides of A4 or less.
  • Readability: To help busy recruiters scan through your CV, make sure your section headings stand out - bold or coloured text works well. Additionally, try to use bullet points wherever you can, as they're far easier to skim through than huge paragraphs. Lastly, don't be afraid of white space on your CV - a little breathing space is great for readability.
  • Design: The saying 'less is more' couldn't be more applicable to CVs. Readability is key, so avoid overly complicated designs and graphics. A subtle colour palette and easy-to-read font is all you need!
  • Avoid photos: Recruiters can't factor in appearance, gender or race into the recruitment process, so a profile photo is totally unnecessary. Additionally, company logos or images won't add any value to your application, so you're better off saving the space to showcase your experience instead.

 

Structuring your CV

As you write your CV, divide and sub-head into the following sections:

  • Name and contact details - Always start with these, so employers know exactly how to get in touch with you.
  • CV profile - Add a short summary of your relevant experience, skills and achievements, which highlights your suitability.
  • Core skills section - A 2-3 columned list of your key skills.
  • Work experience - A detailed list of any relevant work experience, whether paid or voluntary.
  • Education - An overview of your academic background and any training you may have completed.
  • Hobbies and interests - A brief overview of your hobbies and interests, if they're relevant (optional).

 

Now I'll guide you through exactly what you should include in each CV section.

 

 

CV Contact Details

CV contact details

 

Write your contact details in the top corner of your CV, so that they're easy to find but don't take up too much space.

You only need to list your basic details, such as:

  • Mobile number
  • Email address
  • Location - Don't list your full address. Your town or city, such as 'Norwich' or 'Coventry' is perfect.
  • LinkedIn profile or portfolio URL - Remember to update these before listing them on an application.

 

 

Cyber security CV Profile

Recruiters and hiring managers are busy, so it's essential to catch their attention from the get-go.

A strong introductory profile (or personal statement, for junior candidates) at the top of the CV is the first thing they'll read, so it's a great chance to make an impression.

It should be a short but punchy summary of your key skills, relevant experience and accomplishments.

Ultimately, it should explain why you're a great fit for the role you're applying for and inspire recruiters to read the rest of your CV.

 

CV profile

 

Tips for creating an impactful CV profile:

  • Keep it brief: It might be tempting to submit a page-long CV profile, but recruiters won't have the time to read it. To ensure every word gets read, it's best to include high-level information only; sticking to a length of 3-5 lines.
  • Tailor it: Recruiters can spot a generic, mass-produced CV at a glance - and they certainly won't be impressed! Before you write your profile (and CV as a whole), read through the job advert and make a list of any skills, knowledge and experience required. You should then incorporate your findings throughout your profile and the rest of your CV.
  • Don't add an objective: If you want to discuss your career objectives, save them for your cover letter, rather than wasting valuable CV profile space.
  • Avoid cliches: Clichés like "blue-sky thinker with a go-getter attitude” might sound impressive to you, but they don’t actually tell the recruiter much about you. Concentrate on highlighting hard facts and skills, as recruiters are more likely to take these on board.

 

What to include in your Cyber security CV profile?

  • Summary of experience: Recruiters will want to know what type of companies you’ve worked for, industries you have knowledge of, and the type of work you’ve carried out in the past, so give them a summary of this in your profile.
  • Relevant skills: Employers need to know what skills you can bring to their organisation, and ideally they want to see skills that match their job vacancy. So, research your target roles thoroughly and add the most important Cyber security skills to your profile.
  • Essential qualifications: If you have any qualifications which are highly relevant to Cyber security jobs, then highlight them in your profile so that employers do not miss them.

 

Quick tip: Even the best of writers can overlook typos and spelling mistakes. Whilst writing your CV, use a free writing assistant tool, such as Grammarly, to help you avoid any silly errors.

 

Core skills section

Next, you should create a bullet pointed list of your core skills, formatted into 2-3 columns.

Here, you should focus on including the most important skills or knowledge listed in the job advertisement.

This will instantly prove that you're an ideal candidate, even if a recruiter only has time to briefly scan your CV.

 

Core skills 

 


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Work experience/Career history

By this point, employers will be keen to know more detail about you career history.

Starting with your most recent role and working backwards, create a snappy list of any relevant roles you've held.

This could be freelance, voluntary, part-time or temporary jobs too. Anything that's relevant to your target role is well-worth listing!

 

CV work experience

  

Structuring your roles

Whilst writing your CV, it's essential to look at it from the eyes of a recruiter.

If they're met with giant blocks of text which are impossible to navigate, they might get frustrated and skip onto the next CV.

Instead, make use of the 3-step structure shown below, to give them a pleasant reading experience.

  

Role descriptions

 

Outline

Start with a solid introduction to your role as a whole, in order to build some context.

Explain the nature of the organisation you worked for, the size of the team you were part of, who you reported to and what the overarching purpose of your job was.

E.g.

“Working alongside an established team of Cyber Security Analysts and accountable for maintaining, troubleshooting and responding to cyber security risks across a large marketing business.”

 

Key responsibilities

Using easy-to-read bullet points, note down your day-to-day responsibilities in the role.

Make sure to showcase how you used your hard sector skills and knowledge.

E.g.

  • Manage day to day operational cyber security tasks in order to maintain optimum business security
  • Work closely with other members of the team to ensure the technology, security policies and procedures are in place to safeguard the business
  • Develop, maintain and support the organisation's network and IT security systems including; managing firewalls, responding to security incidents and analysing security breaches

 

Key achievements

Lastly, add impact by highlight 1-3 key achievements that you made within the role.

Struggling to think of an achievement? If it had a positive impact on your company, it counts.

For example, you might increased company profits, improved processes, or something simpler, such as going above and beyond to solve a customer's problem.

E.g.

  • Designed and implemented 62 system recovery procedures, ensuring losses were kept to a minimum should an attack occur.
  • Reduced the risk of cyber attacks by 19% by developing and rolling out specific periodic security updates.

 

Education

Next up, you should list your education and qualifications.

This can include your formal qualifications (a degree, A-Levels and GCSEs), as well as sector-specific Cyber security qualifications and/or training.

While school leavers and recent grads should include a lot of detail here to make up for the lack of work experience, experienced candidates may benefit from a shorter education section, as your work experience section will be more important to recruiters.

 

 

Interests and hobbies

Although this is an optional section, it can be useful if your hobbies and interests will add further depth to your CV.

Interests which are related to the sector you are applying to, or which show transferable skills like leadership or teamwork, can worth listing.

On the other hand, generic hobbies like "going out with friends" won't add any value to your application, so are best left off your CV.

 

 


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Essential skills for your Cyber security CV

Tailoring your CV to the roles you are applying for is key to success, so make sure to read through the job descriptions and tailor your skills accordingly.

However, commonly desired Cyber security skills include:

Technical and programmingYour cyber security CV needs to provide evidence of a range of technical skills from intrusion detection and cloud knowledge to malware analysis and reversing.

ForesightIt’s vital that you display how you manage the bigger picture of threats with foresight rooted in analysis.

Risk analysis and mitigationYour CV should clearly reference your skills in understanding risk and prevention.

AdaptabilityDemonstrate your flexibility, particularly in diagnostics and problem solving.

Presentation skillsThose in cyber security must be able to confidently present and communicate complex information to an array of stakeholders.

 

 

Writing your Cyber security CV

Creating a strong Cyber security CV requires a blend of punchy content, considered structure and format, and heavy tailoring.

By creating a punchy profile and core skills list, you'll be able to hook recruiter's attention and ensure your CV gets read.

Remember that research and relevance is the key to a good CV, so research your target roles before you start writing and pack your CV with relevant skills.

Best of luck with your next application!