Junior Network Engineer CV example

With so many businesses relying heavily on their networks for the daily running of the business, engineers are in high demand right now.

So, if you’re able to support the team with installing, configuring and maintaining network infrastructure, you need to prove it with a persuasive CV that highlights your incredible skill set.

To help you do this, we’ve put together the step-by-step writing guide and a junior network engineer CV example below.

 

 

 

Junior Network Engineer CV example

Junior Network Engineer CV 1

Junior Network Engineer CV 2

 

This is a good example of a Junior Network Engineer CV which contains all of the information that a hiring manager will need to be impressed, and presents it in a well- structured, easy-to-read format.

Take some time to study and understand this CV, and refer to it throughout the writing of your own CV for best results.

 

CV builder

 

Junior Network Engineer CV format and structure

In a highly competitive job market, recruiters and employers are often inundated with applications. If they can’t find what they’re looking for in your CV quickly, they may skip past your application and move on to the next one in their inbox

So, it’s crucial to structure and format your CV in a way that enables them to find your essential details with ease, even if they’re pressed for time.

 

How to write a CV

 

Tips for formatting your Junior Network Engineer CV

  • Length: It’s essential to keep your CV concise, regardless of whether you have one year or thirty years of experience. Recruiters are frequently managing multiple roles and responsibilities and do not have the luxury of reading lengthy CVs. Therefore, limit your CV to two sides of A4. If you have little industry experience, one page is sufficient.
  • Readability: Help out time-strapped recruiters by formatting your CV for easy reading. Using lots of bullet points and lists will help them to skim through your info, while clearly formatted headings will allow them to navigate towards the content which is most useful to them.
  • Design & format: While it’s okay to add your own spin to your CV, avoid overdoing the design. If you go for something elaborate, you might end up frustrating recruiters who, above anything, value simplicity and clarity.
  • Photos: You can add a profile photo to your CV, if you want to add some personality to it, but they are not a requirement the UK, so you don’t have to.

 

Quick tip: Creating a professional CV style can be difficult and time-consuming when using Microsoft Word or Google Docs. To create a winning CV quickly, try our quick-and-easy CV Builder and use one of their eye-catching professional CV templates.

 

CV formatting tips

 

 

CV structure

For easy reading, write your CV to the following CV structure:

  • Contact details – Make it easy for recruiters to get in touch with you by listing your contact details at the top of your CV.
  • Profile – A short and snappy summary of your experience and skills, showcasing what makes you a good fit for the position.
  • Work experience / career history – Note down all your work history, with your current position first, then working backwards.
  • Education – A short list of your academic background and professional/vocational qualifications.
  • Interest and hobbies – This is an optional section, which you can use to highlight any relevant hobbies or interests.

Now you understand the basic layout of a CV, here’s what you should include in each section of yours.

 

Contact Details

Contact details

 

Start off your CV with a basic list of your contact details.
Here’s what you should include:

  • Mobile number
  • Email address – It’s often helpful to make a new email address, specifically for your job applications.
  • Location – Share your town or city; there’s no need for a full address.
  • LinkedIn profile or portfolio URL – Make sure the information on them is coherent with your CV, and that they’re up-to-date

Quick tip: Delete excessive details, such as your date of birth or marital status. Recruiters don’t need to know this much about you, so it’s best to save the space for your other CV sections.

 

Junior Network Engineer CV Profile

Recruiters read through countless applications every day.

If they don’t find what they’re looking for quickly, they’ll simply move onto the next one.

That’s what makes your CV profile (or personal statement, if you’re an entry-level/graduate candidate) so important.

This short and snappy summary sits at the top of your CV, and should give a high-level overview of why you’re a good match for the job.

This way, you can ensure that busy recruiters see your suitability from the outset, and so, feel your CV is worth their time.

 

CV profile

 

How to write a good CV profile:

  • Make it short and sharp: Recruiters are busy, so to ensure your profile is actually read, it’s best to keep it short and snappy. 3-5 punchy lines makes for the perfect profile.
  • Tailor it: Recruiters can spot a generic, mass-produced CV at a glance – and they certainly won’t be impressed! Before you write your profile (and CV as a whole), read through the job advert and make a list of any skills, knowledge and experience required. You should then incorporate your findings throughout your profile and the rest of your CV.
  • Don’t add an objective: Avoid discussing your career goals in your CV profile – if you think they’re necessary, briefly mention them in your cover letter instead.
  • Avoid generic phrases: If your CV is riddled with clichès like “Dynamic thought-leader”, hit that delete button. Phrases like these are like a broken record to recruiters, who read them countless times per day. Hard facts, skills, knowledge and results are sure to yield far better results.

 

Example CV profile for Junior Network Engineer

Dedicated Junior Network Engineer with 5+ years of experience in ensuring the reliability, security, and efficiency of communication infrastructure under the guidance of senior personnel. Basic understanding of protocols such as TCP/IP, VLANs, DHCP, DSN, FTP, STP, SSH, BGP, and OSPF. Ability to aid with inventory control of IT licences and other supplies. Passionate about being an active member of a group that drives high-profile projects with executive leadership and business visibility.

 

What to include in your Junior Network Engineer CV profile?

  • Experience overview: Showcase your aptitude for the job you are aiming for by giving a brief summary of your past work history, including the industries you have worked in, the kinds of employers you have served, and the roles you have held.
  • Targeted skills: Highlight your skills which are most relevant to Junior Network Engineer jobs, to ensure that recruiters see your most in-demand skills as soon as they open your CV.
  • Important qualifications: If you have any qualifications which are highly relevant to Junior Network Engineer jobs, then highlight them in your profile so that employers do not miss them.

 

Quick tip: If you are finding it difficult to write an attention-grabbing CV profile, choose from hundreds of pre-written profiles across all industries, and add one to your CV with one click in our quick-and-easy CV Builder. All profiles are written by recruitment experts and easily tailored to suit your unique skillset.

 

Core skills section

To ensure that your most relevant skills catch the eye of readers, create a core skills section below your profile.

This section should be presented in 2-3 columns of bullet points highlighting your applicable skills. Before crafting this section, carefully examine the job description and create a list of any required skills, specialisms, or knowledge.

Use this list to include the necessary information in your section and present yourself as the ideal match for the position.

 

Core skills section CV

 

Important skills for your Junior Network Engineer CV

Networking Protocols – Maintaining an in-depth knowledge of networking protocols such as TCP/IP, DHCP, DNS, and HTTP, and their roles in data transmission.

Routing and Switching – Configuring and managing network routers and switches, including VLANs, routing protocols (e.g., OSPF, BGP), and network segmentation.

Firewall and Security – Using firewall technologies, access control lists (ACLs), and security best practices to protect network infrastructure.

Network Troubleshooting – Identifying and resolving network issues, including packet analysis and use of network diagnostic tools.

Network Monitoring – Using network monitoring tools like Nagios, Wireshark, or SNMP for proactive network performance monitoring and alerting.

Wireless Networking – Using wireless networking standards (e.g., 802.11ac) to configure and secure wireless access points.

Cisco Technologies – Maintaining knowledge of Cisco networking equipment and certification, such as CCNA, CCNP, or CCIE.

Network Security – Using network security principles, including VPNs, IDS/IPS, and encryption methods to protect data in transit.

Network Design – Designing and planning network architecture, considering scalability, redundancy, and disaster recovery.

Scripting and Automation – Using scripting languages like Python or Bash to automate network tasks, streamline configurations, and improve efficiency.

 

Quick tip: Our quick-and-easy CV Builder has thousands of in-demand skills for all industries and professions, that can be added to your CV in seconds – This will save you time and ensure you get noticed by recruiters.

 

CV builder

 

Work experience

Recruiters will be itching to know more about your relevant experience by now.

Kick-start this section with your most recent (or current) position, and work your way backwards through your history.

You can include voluntary and freelance work, too – as long as you’re honest about the nature of the work.

 

CV work experience

 

Structuring each job

Lengthy, unbroken chunks of text is a recruiters worst nightmare, but your work experience section can easily end up looking like that if you are not careful.

To avoid this, use my tried-and-tested 3-step structure, as illustrated below:

 

Role descriptions

 

Outline

Firstly, give the reader some context by creating a punchy summary of the job as a whole.

You should mention what the purpose or goal of your role was, what team you were part of and who you reported to.

 

Key responsibilities

Use bullet points to detail the key responsibilities of your role, highlighting hard skills, software and knowledge wherever you can.

Keep them short and sharp to make them easily digestible by readers.

 

Key achievements

Lastly, add impact by highlight 1-3 key achievements that you made within the role.

Struggling to think of an achievement? If it had a positive impact on your company, it counts.

For example, you might increased company profits, improved processes, or something simpler, such as going above and beyond to solve a customer’s problem.

 

Sample job description for Junior Network Engineer CV

Outline

Assist in the planning, roll out, and maintenance of networks, for an innovative and disruptive company which specialises in building award-winning smart cities that support Internet of Things.

Key Responsibilities

  • Setup of various equipment by being aware of goals, confirming that all components are available, labelling cables, and checking firmware.
  • Administer an existing Azure and legacy VMware server environments, as well as propose improvements and make recommendations to achieve best practices.
  • Troubleshoot connectivity problems, implement solutions, and provide technical analysis to all customers to isolate issues and restore/activate devices within defined SLAs.
  • Contribute towards consolidating measures, including gateways, packet filters, and NAC lists to identify suspicious act, protect sensitive data, and grant appropriate levels of access.

 

Quick tip: Create impressive job descriptions easily in our quick-and-easy CV Builder by adding pre-written job phrases for every industry and career stage.

 

 

Education section

At the bottom of your CV is your full education section. You can list your formal academic qualifications, such as:

  • Degree
  • GCSE’s
  • A levels

As well as any specific Junior Network Engineer qualifications that are essential to the jobs you are applying for. Note down the name of the qualification, the organisation at which you studied, and the date of completion.

 

Hobbies and interests

The hobbies and interests CV section isn’t mandatory, so don’t worry if you’re out of room by this point.

However, if you have an interesting hobby, or an interest that could make you seem more suitable for the role, then certainly think about adding.

Be careful what you include though… Only consider hobbies that exhibit skills that are required for roles as a Junior Network Engineer, or transferable workplace skills.

There is never any need to tell employers that you like to watch TV and eat out.

 

CV builder

 

A strong, compelling CV is essential to get noticed and land interviews with the best employers.

To ensure your CV stands out from the competition, make sure to tailor it to your target role and pack it with sector-specific skills and results.

Remember to triple-check for spelling and grammar errors before hitting send.

Good luck with the job search!