Information Security Analyst CV example

In the rapidly evolving digital age, an Information Security Analyst is crucial in protecting a company’s sensitive data.

Crafting a standout CV is just as vital to highlight your expertise in this specialist field.

Dive into our guide for top-tier advice and an Information Security Analyst CV example to secure your next role.

 

 

 

Information Security Analyst CV example

Information Security Analyst CV 1

Information Security Analyst CV 2

 

Before you start writing your CV, take a look at the example Information Security Analyst CV above to give yourself a good idea of the style and format that works best in today’s job market.

Also, take note of the type of content that is included to impress recruiters, and how the most relevant information is made prominent, to ensure it gets noticed.

 

CV builder

 

Information Security Analyst CV format and structure

In a highly competitive job market, recruiters and employers are often inundated with applications. If they can’t find what they’re looking for in your CV quickly, they may skip past your application and move on to the next one in their inbox

So, it’s crucial to structure and format your CV in a way that enables them to find your essential details with ease, even if they’re pressed for time.

 

How to write a CV

 

Tips for formatting your Information Security Analyst CV

  • Length: Whether you’ve got one year or three decades of experience, your CV should never be more than two sides of A4. Recruiters are busy people who’re often juggling numerous roles and tasks, so they don’t have time to read lengthy applications. If you’re a recent graduate or don’t have much industry experience, one side of A4 is fine.
  • Readability: To help busy recruiters scan through your CV, make sure your section headings stand out – bold or coloured text works well. Additionally, try to use bullet points wherever you can, as they’re far easier to skim through than huge paragraphs. Lastly, don’t be afraid of white space on your CV – a little breathing space is great for readability.
  • Design & format: When it comes to CV design, it’s best to keep things simple and sleek. While elaborate designs certainly command attention, it’s not always for the right reasons! Readability is key, so whatever you choose to do, make sure you prioritise readability above everything.
  • Photos: Profile photos or aren’t a requirement for most industries, so you don’t need to add one in the UK – but if you do, just make sure it looks professional

 

Quick tip: Creating a professional CV style can be difficult and time-consuming when using Microsoft Word or Google Docs. To create a winning CV quickly, try our quick-and-easy CV Builder and use one of our eye-catching professional CV templates.

 

CV formatting tips

 

 

CV structure

When writing your own CV, break up your CV content into the following key sections:

  • Name and contact details – Place them at the top of your CV, so that employers can easily get in touch.
  • CV profile – A punchy sales pitch of your key experience, skills and achievements to reel readers in.
  • Core skills section – A bullet-pointed snapshot of your abilities.
  • Work experience – A well-structured list of your relevant work experience.
  • Education – An overview of any relevant qualifications or professional training you have.
  • Hobbies and interests – A short description of any relevant hobbies or interests (optional).

Now you understand the basic layout of a CV, here’s what you should include in each section of yours.

 

Contact Details

Contact details

 

Kick-start your CV with your contact details, so recruiters can get in touch easily.
Here’s what you should include:

  • Mobile number
  • Email address – Make sure it’s professional, with no silly nicknames.
  • Location – Your town or city is sufficient, rather than a full address.
  • LinkedIn profile or portfolio URL – Ensure they’ve been updated and are looking slick and professional.

Quick tip: Avoid listing your date of birth, marital status or other irrelevant details – they’re unnecessary at this stage.

 

Information Security Analyst CV Profile

Grab the reader’s attention by kick-starting your CV with a powerful profile (or personal statement, if you’re a junior applicant).

This is a short introduction paragraph which summarises your skills, knowledge and experience.

It should paint you as the perfect match for the job description and entice recruiters to read through the rest of your CV.

 

CV profile

 

How to write a good CV profile:

  • Make it short and sharp: Aim for a short, snappy paragraph of 3-5 lines. This is just enough room to showcase why you’d make the perfect hire, without going into excessive detail and overwhelming busy recruiters.
  • Tailor it: The biggest CV mistake? A generic, mass-produced document which is sent out to tens of employers. If you want to land an interview, you need to tailor your CV profile (and your application as a whole) to the specific roles you’re applying for. So, before you start writing, remember to read over those job descriptions and make a list of the skills, knowledge and experience the employers are looking for.
  • Don’t add an objective: You only have a small space for your CV profile, so avoid writing down your career goals or objectives. If you think these will help your application, incorporate them into your cover letter instead.
  • Avoid generic phrases: “Determined team player who always gives 110%” might seem like a good way to fill up your CV profile, but generic phrases like this won’t land you an interview. Recruiters hear them time and time again and have no real reason to believe them. Instead, pack your profile with your hard skills and tangible achievements.

 

Example CV profile for Information Security Analyst

ITA-Certified Information Security Analyst with 15+ years of experience developing digital security solutions for large corporations. Detail-oriented data analyst with a master’s degree in information security and cybercrime from Manchester University. Demonstrated expertise in improving incident response with extensive knowledge of NIST, ISO 27001, and GDPR.

 

What to include in your Information Security Analyst CV profile?

  • Experience overview: Start with a brief summary of your relevant experience so far. How many years experience do you have? What type of companies have you worked for? What industries/sectors have you worked in? What are your specialisms?
  • Targeted skills: Highlight your skills which are most relevant to Information Security Analyst jobs, to ensure that recruiters see your most in-demand skills as soon as they open your CV.
  • Important qualifications: Be sure to outline your relevant Information Security Analyst qualifications, so that anyone reading the CV can instantly see you are qualified for the jobs you are applying to.

 

Quick tip: If you are finding it difficult to write an attention-grabbing CV profile, choose from hundreds of pre-written profiles across all industries, and add one to your CV with one click in our quick-and-easy CV Builder. All profiles are written by recruitment experts and easily tailored to suit your unique skillset.

 

Core skills section

Next, you should create a bullet pointed list of your core skills, formatted into 2-3 columns.

Here, you should focus on including the most important skills or knowledge listed in the job advertisement.

This will instantly prove that you’re an ideal candidate, even if a recruiter only has time to briefly scan your CV.

 

Core skills section CV

 

Important skills for your Information Security Analyst CV

Cybersecurity Framework Implementation – Enforcing structured frameworks like NIST, ISO 27001 to establish robust security policies and procedures within an organisation.

Network Security Protocols – Setting up and managing security measures such as firewalls, anti-virus software, and intrusion detection systems to protect network infrastructures.

Security Risk Assessment – Conducting thorough evaluations of information systems to identify vulnerabilities and recommend measures to mitigate risks.

Incident Response Planning – Preparing and maintaining incident response plans to ensure swift action and minimise impact during security breaches.

Security Auditing – Performing regular security audits to ensure compliance with security policies and regulatory requirements.

Cryptography – Applying encryption techniques to secure sensitive data in transit and at rest from unauthorized access and potential breaches.

Access Control Management – Administering access to information systems through proper authentication, authorization, and accounting to prevent unauthorised use.

Penetration Testing – Executing planned attacks on systems to evaluate the effectiveness of security measures and identify potential weaknesses.

Cloud Security – Safeguarding cloud-based systems and data by implementing industry-standard cloud security protocols and practices.

Threat Intelligence Analysis – Gathering and analysing information about emerging cyber threats to proactively defend against and respond to security challenges.

 

Quick tip: Our quick-and-easy CV Builder has thousands of in-demand skills for all industries and professions, that can be added to your CV in seconds – This will save you time and ensure you get noticed by recruiters.

 

CV builder

 

Work experience

Now that recruiters have a good overview of your skills and abilities, you need to jump into the detail of your career history.

Give them a more thorough insight into what you can do by creating a detailed list of your relevant experience.

Start with your current role, and work backwards through all the relevant positions you’ve held.
This could be freelance, contract or voluntary work too; as long as it’s related to the role you’re applying for.

 

CV work experience order

 

Structuring each job

Recruiters will be keen to gain a better idea of where you’ve worked and how you apply your skill-set in the workplace.

However, if they’re faced with huge, hard-to-read paragraphs, they may just gloss over it and move onto the next application.

To avoid this, use the simple 3-step role structure, as shown below:

 

CV role descriptions

 

Outline

Start with a brief summary of your role as a whole, as well as the type of company you worked for.

 

Key responsibilities

Use bullet points to detail the key responsibilities of your role, highlighting hard skills, software and knowledge wherever you can.

Keep them short and sharp to make them easily digestible by readers.

 

Key achievements

Finish off by showcasing 1-3 key achievements made within the role.

This could be anything that had a positive effect on your company, clients or customers, such as saving time or money, receiving exemplary feedback or receiving an award.

 

Sample job description for Information Security Analyst CV

Outline

Work at a leading digital software and security consultancy, developing information security strategies to manage risks for clients in the healthcare, financial, and retail industries.

Key Responsibilities

  • Conduct security assessments and penetration tests for clients.
  • Integrate and optimise TechSafe+ cybersecurity software for individual company needs, writing new SQL code to adapt systems and firewalls.
  • Manage security policies and procedures based on best practices and regulatory standards.
  • Develop security architecture to ensure the integrity, confidentiality, and availability of data.

 

Quick tip: Create impressive job descriptions easily in our quick-and-easy CV Builder by adding pre-written job phrases for every industry and career stage.

 

 

Education section

Although there should be mentions of your highest and most relevant qualifications earlier on in your CV, save your exhaustive list of qualifications for the bottom.

If you’re an experienced candidate, simply include the qualifications that are highly relevant to Information Security Analyst roles.

However, less experienced candidates can provide a more thorough list of qualifications, including A-Levels and GCSEs.

You can also dedicate more space to your degree, discussing relevant exams, assignments and modules in more detail, if your target employers consider them to be important.

 

Hobbies and interests

This section is entirely optional, so you’ll have to use your own judgement to figure out if it’s worth including.

If your hobbies and interests could make you appear more suitable for your dream job, then they are definitely worth adding.

Interests which are related to the industry, or hobbies like sports teams or volunteering, which display valuable transferable skills might be worth including.

 

CV builder

 

When putting together your Information Security Analyst CV, there are a few key points to remember

Always tailor your CV to the target role, even if it means creating several versions for different roles.

Additionally, remember that the structure and format of your CV needs just as much attention as the content.

Good luck with your job search!