Cisco Network Engineer CV example

Do you know everything there is to know about Cisco and network security?

Then you could be a valued network engineer, helping organisations to keep their data and information safe.

But such an important job requires a strong skill set and a CV that reflects this. So, make the most of our detailed guide and Cisco network engineer CV example below to help you with your job search.

 

 

 

Cisco Network Engineer CV example

Cisco Network Engineer CV 1

Cisco Network Engineer CV 2

 

This example CV demonstrates how to structure and format your own Cisco Network Engineer CV, so that it can be easily digested by busy hiring managers, and quickly prove why you are suitable for the jobs you are applying to.

It also gives you a good idea of the type of skills, experience and qualifications that you need to be highlighting in your CV.

 

CV builder

 

Cisco Network Engineer CV format and structure

First impressions count, so a sloppy, disorganised CV may cause your CV to be overlooked..

Instead, perfect the format and structure of your CV by working to a clear logical structure and applying some simple formatting tricks to ease readability.

Don’t underestimate the importance of this step; if your CV lacks readability, your written content won’t even be seen.

 

How to write a CV

 

Tips for formatting your Cisco Network Engineer CV

  • Length: It’s essential to keep your CV concise, regardless of whether you have one year or thirty years of experience. Recruiters are frequently managing multiple roles and responsibilities and do not have the luxury of reading lengthy CVs. Therefore, limit your CV to two sides of A4. If you have little industry experience, one page is sufficient.
  • Readability: To help busy recruiters scan through your CV, make sure your section headings stand out – bold or coloured text works well. Additionally, try to use bullet points wherever you can, as they’re far easier to skim through than huge paragraphs. Lastly, don’t be afraid of white space on your CV – a little breathing space is great for readability.
  • Design & format: The saying ‘less is more’ couldn’t be more applicable to CVs. Readability is key, so avoid overly complicated designs and graphics. A subtle colour palette and easy-to-read font is all you need!
  • Photos: You can add a profile photo to your CV, if you want to add some personality to it, but they are not a requirement the UK, so you don’t have to.

 

Quick tip: Creating a professional CV style can be difficult and time-consuming when using Microsoft Word or Google Docs. To create a winning CV quickly, try our quick-and-easy CV Builder and use one of their eye-catching professional CV templates.

 

CV formatting tips

 

 

CV structure

When writing your CV, break up the content into the following key sections, to ensure it can be easily digested by busy recruiters and hiring managers:

  • Contact details – Always list these at the very top of your CV – you don’t want them to be missed!
  • Profile – An introductory paragraph, intended to grab recruiters attention and summarise your offering.
  • Work experience / career history – Working from your current role and working backwards, list your relevant work experience.
  • Education – Create a snappy summary of your education and qualifications.
  • Interest and hobbies – An optional section to document any hobbies that demonstrate transferable skills.

Now you understand the basic layout of a CV, here’s what you should include in each section of yours.

 

Contact Details

Contact details

 

Start off your CV with a basic list of your contact details.
Here’s what you should include:

  • Mobile number
  • Email address – It’s often helpful to make a new email address, specifically for your job applications.
  • Location – Share your town or city; there’s no need for a full address.
  • LinkedIn profile or portfolio URL – Make sure the information on them is coherent with your CV, and that they’re up-to-date

Quick tip: Delete excessive details, such as your date of birth or marital status. Recruiters don’t need to know this much about you, so it’s best to save the space for your other CV sections.

 

Cisco Network Engineer CV Profile

Recruiters and hiring managers are busy, so it’s essential to catch their attention from the get-go.

A strong introductory profile (or personal statement, for junior candidates) at the top of the CV is the first thing they’ll read, so it’s a great chance to make an impression.

It should be a short but punchy summary of your key skills, relevant experience and accomplishments.

Ultimately, it should explain why you’re a great fit for the role you’re applying for and inspire recruiters to read the rest of your CV.

 

CV profile

 

How to write a good CV profile:

  • Make it short and sharp: The best CV profiles are short, sharp and highly relevant to the target role. For this reason, it’s best to write 3-4 lines of high-level information, as anything over might be missed.
  • Tailor it: If recruiters don’t see your suitability within a few seconds, they may close your CV straight away. Your CV profile should closely match the essential requirements listed in the job ad, so make sure to review them before you write it.
  • Don’t add an objective: Want to talk about your career goals and objectives? While the profile may seem like a good space to do so, they’re actually much better suited to your cover letter.
  • Avoid generic phrases: Cheesy clichès and generic phrases won’t impress recruiters, who read the same statements several times per day. Impress them with your skill-set, experience and accomplishments instead!

 

Example CV profile for Cisco Network Engineer

Highly skilled CISCO Network Engineer with 7 years of experience in designing, implementing, and maintaining complex networks for medium to large-scale organisations. Proficient in routing and switching technologies, network security, wireless networks, and cloud-based solutions. Possesses a strong understanding of WAN/LAN network protocols and experience working with enterprise-level network management tools. Certified in CCNA, CCNP, and CCIE Security.

 

What to include in your Cisco Network Engineer CV profile?

  • Experience overview: Start with a brief summary of your relevant experience so far. How many years experience do you have? What type of companies have you worked for? What industries/sectors have you worked in? What are your specialisms?
  • Targeted skills: Highlight your skills which are most relevant to Cisco Network Engineer jobs, to ensure that recruiters see your most in-demand skills as soon as they open your CV.
  • Important qualifications: If the jobs you are applying to require candidates to have certain qualifications, then you must add them in your profile to ensure they are seen by hiring managers.

 

Quick tip: If you are finding it difficult to write an attention-grabbing CV profile, choose from hundreds of pre-written profiles across all industries, and add one to your CV with one click in our quick-and-easy CV Builder. All profiles are written by recruitment experts and easily tailored to suit your unique skillset.

 

Core skills section

To ensure that your most relevant skills catch the eye of readers, create a core skills section below your profile.

This section should be presented in 2-3 columns of bullet points highlighting your applicable skills. Before crafting this section, carefully examine the job description and create a list of any required skills, specialisms, or knowledge.

Use this list to include the necessary information in your section and present yourself as the ideal match for the position.

 

Core skills section CV

 

Important skills for your Cisco Network Engineer CV

Network Infrastructure Design and Configuration – Designing, implementing, and configuring network infrastructure using Cisco routers, switches, and other networking devices.

Routing and Switching Protocols – Utilising routing protocols such as OSPF, EIGRP, and BGP, and switching protocols like VLANs, Spanning Tree Protocol (STP), and Virtual Router Redundancy Protocol (VRRP).

Network Security – Utilising knowledge of Cisco security solutions and protocols, including VPNs, firewalls, access control lists (ACLs), and secure network design principles.

Network Troubleshooting – Identifying and resolving network issues using diagnostic tools, command-line utilities, and log analysis, ensuring optimal network performance.

Network Monitoring and Management – Monitoring network performance, analysing network traffic, and managing network devices using tools like Cisco Prime Infrastructure or SolarWinds.

Cisco IOS and CLI – Utilising Cisco Internetwork Operating System (IOS) and Command-Line Interface (CLI) for device configuration, troubleshooting, and maintenance.

Network Virtualisation – Utilising virtualisation technologies like Cisco Virtual Switching System (VSS), Virtual PortChannels (vPC), and Virtual LAN (VLAN) configuration.

Quality of Service (QoS) – Implementing QoS policies to prioritise and optimise network traffic for voice, video, and data applications.

Network Protocols and Standards – Utilising knowledge of TCP/IP, DNS, DHCP, SNMP, NAT, and other network protocols and standards.

Documentation and Reporting – Creating comprehensive network documentation, including network diagrams, configurations, and incident reports, ensuring accurate records, and facilitating knowledge sharing.

 

Quick tip: Our quick-and-easy CV Builder has thousands of in-demand skills for all industries and professions, that can be added to your CV in seconds – This will save you time and ensure you get noticed by recruiters.

 

CV builder

 

Work experience

By this point, employers will be keen to know more detail about you career history.

Starting with your most recent role and working backwards, create a snappy list of any relevant roles you’ve held.

This could be freelance, voluntary, part-time or temporary jobs too. Anything that’s relevant to your target role is well-worth listing!

 
Work experience
 

Structuring each job

Recruiters will be keen to gain a better idea of where you’ve worked and how you apply your skill-set in the workplace.

However, if they’re faced with huge, hard-to-read paragraphs, they may just gloss over it and move onto the next application.

To avoid this, use the simple 3-step role structure, as shown below:

 
Role descriptions
 

Outline

Firstly, give the reader some context by creating a punchy summary of the job as a whole.

You should mention what the purpose or goal of your role was, what team you were part of and who you reported to.

 

Key responsibilities

Follow with a snappy list of bullet points, detailing your daily duties and responsibilities.

Tailor it to the role you’re applying for by mentioning how you put the target employer’s desired hard skills and knowledge to use in this role.

 

Key achievements

Lastly, add impact by highlight 1-3 key achievements that you made within the role.

Struggling to think of an achievement? If it had a positive impact on your company, it counts.

For example, you might increased company profits, improved processes, or something simpler, such as going above and beyond to solve a customer’s problem.

 

Sample job description for Cisco Network Engineer CV

Outline

Provide end-to-end network solutions to support construction projects of varying scales across the north of England, from installation to maintenance and pack down.

Key Responsibilities

  • Design, install, and configure LAN and WAN networks for construction sites, using CISCO routers
  • Implement network security measures, including firewalls, VPNs, and intrusion detection systems
  • Monitor network performance, identifying and resolving issues to ensure minimal downtime
  • Provide end-user support and troubleshooting, responding to inquiries and resolving technical issues

 

Quick tip: Create impressive job descriptions easily in our quick-and-easy CV Builder by adding pre-written job phrases for every industry and career stage.

 

 

Education section

After your work experience, your education section should provide a detailed view of your academic background.

Begin with those most relevant to Cisco Network Engineer jobs, such as vocational training or degrees.
If you have space, you can also mention your academic qualifications, such as A-Levels and GCSEs.

Focus on the qualifications that are most relevant to the jobs you are applying for.

 

Hobbies and interests

The hobbies and interests CV section isn’t mandatory, so don’t worry if you’re out of room by this point.

However, if you have an interesting hobby, or an interest that could make you seem more suitable for the role, then certainly think about adding.

Be careful what you include though… Only consider hobbies that exhibit skills that are required for roles as a Cisco Network Engineer, or transferable workplace skills.

There is never any need to tell employers that you like to watch TV and eat out.

 

CV builder

 

When putting together your Cisco Network Engineer CV, there are a few key points to remember

Always tailor your CV to the target role, even if it means creating several versions for different roles.

Additionally, remember that the structure and format of your CV needs just as much attention as the content.

Good luck with your job search!