Finance director CV example

Finance director CV example

A finance director CV needs to grab the attention of senior hiring managers, so it needs to be flawless.

Learn how to attract plenty of employers with a real-life finance director CV example, and guidance that will help you land the best roles.

 

Guide contents

  • Finance director CV example
  • Structuring and formatting your CV
  • Writing your CV profile
  • Detailing work experience
  • Your education
  • Skills required for your Finance director CV

 

Finance director CV example

Finance director CV 1

 

Finance director CV 2

 

The CV example above shows exactly how a good Finance director should present their skills and experience, in a well structured 2 page document.

This should give you a good idea of how to format your own CV, and the type of information you should be highlighting to recruiters and employees, in order to land interviews.

 

 

Finance director CV structure & format

If you focus on the written content of your CV but ignore how it actually looks, your efforts could end up wasted.

No matter how suitable you are for the role, no recruiter wants to spend time squinting and trying to navigate a badly designed and disorganised CV.

Instead, make sure to organise your content into a simple structure and spend some time formatting it for ease of reading - it'll get you in recruiter's good books from the get-go!

 

CV structure

 

Formatting Tips

  • Length: Whether you've got one year or three decades of experience, your CV should never be more than two sides of A4. Recruiters are busy people who're often juggling numerous roles and tasks, so they don't have time to read lengthy applications. If you're a recent graduate or don't have much industry experience, one side of A4 is fine.
  • Readability: Make sure your CV is easy to read and looks professional by applying some simple formatting tricks. Bullet points are great for making large paragraphs more digestible, while formatting your headings with bold or coloured text will help the reader to find the information they need, with speed.
  • Design: While it's okay to add your own spin to your CV, avoid overdoing the design. If you go for something elaborate, you might end up frustrating recruiters who, above anything, value simplicity and clarity.
  • Avoid photos: Don't add photos, images or profile pictures to your CV. Not only do they take up much-needed CV space, but they're actually completely unnecessary and won't boost your CV at all.

 

Structuring your CV

As you write your CV, work to the simple but effective structure below:

  • Name and contact details - Pop them at the top of your CV, so it's easy for recruiters to contact you.
  • CV profile - Write a snappy overview of what makes you a good fit for the role; discussing your key experience, skills and accomplishments.
  • Core skills section - Add a short but snappy list of your relevant skills and knowledge.
  • Work experience - A list of your relevant work experience, starting with your current role.
  • Education - A summary of your relevant qualifications and professional/vocational training.
  • Hobbies and interests - An optional sections, which you could use to write a short description of any relevant hobbies or interests.

 

Now I'll guide you through exactly what you should include in each CV section.

 

 

CV Contact Details

CV contact details

 

Begin by sharing your contact details, so it's easy for employers to give you a call.
Keep to the basics, such as:

  • Mobile number
  • Email address – It should sound professional, with no slang or nicknames. Make a new one for your job applications if necessary.
  • Location - Simply share your vague location, for example 'Manchester', rather than a full address.
  • LinkedIn profile or portfolio URL - Remember to update them before you send your application.

 

 

Finance director CV Profile

Your CV profile is the first thing recruiters will read - so your goal is to give them a reason to read onto the end of the document!

Create a short and snappy paragraph that showcases your key skills, relevant experience and impressive accomplishments.

Ultimately, it should prove to the reader that you've got what it takes to carry out the job.

 

CV profile

 

Tips for creating an impactful CV profile:

  • Keep it brief: Recruiters are busy, so to ensure your profile is actually read, it's best to keep it short and snappy. 3-5 punchy lines makes for the perfect profile.
  • Tailor it: No matter how much time you put into your CV profile, it won't impress if it's irrelevant to the role you're applying for. Before you start writing, make a list of the skills, knowledge and experience your target employer is looking for. Then, make sure to mention them in your CV profile and throughout the rest of your application.
  • Don't add an objective: Avoid discussing your career goals in your CV profile - if you think they're necessary, briefly mention them in your cover letter instead.
  • Avoid cliches: Cheesy clichès and generic phrases won't impress recruiters, who read the same statements several times per day. Impress them with your skill-set, experience and accomplishments instead!

 

What to include in your Finance director CV profile?

  • Summary of experience: To give employers an idea of your capabilities, show them your track record by giving an overview of the types of companies you have worked for in the past and the roles you have carried out for previous employers – but keep it high level and save the details for your experience section.
  • Relevant skills: Make your most relevant Finance director key skills clear in your profile. These should be tailored to the specific role you're applying for — so make sure to check the job description first, and aim to match their requirements as closely as you can.
  • Essential qualifications: If you have any qualifications which are highly relevant to Finance director jobs, then highlight them in your profile so that employers do not miss them.

 

Quick tip: Your CV is your first impression on recruiters, so it's vital to avoid spelling and grammar mistakes. Use a free writing assistant tool, like Grammarly, to check over your CV before hitting send.

 

Core skills section

Underneath your profile, create a core skills section to make your most relevant skills jump off the page at readers.

It should be made up of 2-3 columns of bullet points of your relevant skills.

Before you do this, look over the job description and make a list of any specific skills, specialisms or knowledge required.

Then, make sure to use your findings in your list. This will paint you as the perfect match for the role.

 

Core skills 

 


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Work experience/Career history

Next up is your work experience section, which is normally the longest part of your CV.

Start with your current (or most recent) job and work your way backwards through your experience.

Can't fit all your roles? Allow more space for your recent career history and shorten down descriptions for your older roles.

 

CV work experience

  

Structuring your roles

Lengthy, unbroken chunks of text is a recruiters worst nightmare, but your work experience section can easily end up looking like that if you are not careful.

To avoid this, use my tried-and-tested 3-step structure, as illustrated below:

  

Role descriptions

 

Outline

Firstly, give the reader some context by creating a punchy summary of the job as a whole.

You should mention what the purpose or goal of your role was, what team you were part of and who you reported to.

E.g.

“Responsible for managing the finance division for one of the largest FMCG organisations in the North West,
Led project to improve efficiencies within the finance division to ensure the business hit profit targets.”

 

Key responsibilities

Next, write up a punchy list of your daily duties and responsibilities, using bullet points.

Wherever you can, point out how you put your hard skills and knowledge to use - especially skills which are applicable to your target role.

E.g.

  • Contributed to developing the strategic direction of the finance division creating an action plan and reporting measurements to understand if the strategic target has been hit.
  • Analysed margins to support decisions on which suppliers to use from their tenders.
  • Co-ordinated all reports about revenue and capital budgets creating regular reports.
  • Assist senior executives with strategic plans by analysing the financial climate and market

 

Key achievements

Lastly, add impact by highlight 1-3 key achievements that you made within the role.

Struggling to think of an achievement? If it had a positive impact on your company, it counts.

For example, you might increased company profits, improved processes, or something simpler, such as going above and beyond to solve a customer's problem.

E.g.

  • Reduced overhead costs across the company which saved the business £500,000 through a restructure

 

Education

Next up, you should list your education and qualifications.

This can include your formal qualifications (a degree, A-Levels and GCSEs), as well as sector-specific Finance director qualifications and/or training.

While school leavers and recent grads should include a lot of detail here to make up for the lack of work experience, experienced candidates may benefit from a shorter education section, as your work experience section will be more important to recruiters.

 

 

Interests and hobbies

This section is entirely optional, so you'll have to use your own judgement to figure out if it's worth including.

If your hobbies and interests could make you appear more suitable for your dream job, then they are definitely worth adding.

Interests which are related to the industry, or hobbies like sports teams or volunteering, which display valuable transferable skills might be worth including.

 

 


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Essential skills for your Finance director CV

Tailoring your CV to the roles you are applying for is key to success, so make sure to read through the job descriptions and tailor your skills accordingly.

However, commonly desired Finance director skills include:

 

Strategic thinkingThe finance director must be well-versed in the strategic needs of the entire business and be able to apply analysis, foresight and business acumen.

DiplomacyYour finance director CV should show your ability to act with tact and discretion through complex negotiation.

Financial leadershipYour CV must demonstrate your business and financial intelligence and how this aids performance.

ReportingYour reporting skills should be evident within your CV, specifically in relation to financial analysis and the ability to communicate effectively with non-financial managers.

Risk management skillsYour skills to interpret and operate within required governance and regulation, with tenacity for mitigating risk, is essential to show.

 

 

Writing your Finance director CV

An interview-winning CV for a Finance director role, needs to be both visually pleasing and packed with targeted content.

Whilst it needs to detail your experience, accomplishments and relevant skills, it also needs to be as clear and easy to read as possible.

Remember to research the role and review the job ad before applying, so you're able to match yourself up to the requirements.

If you follow these guidelines and keep motivated in your job search, you should land an interview in no time.

Best of luck with your next application!