Electrical engineer CV example

Electrical engineer CV example

 

Competition for electrical engineer roles can be tough.

So, it’s down to your electrical engineer CV to impress recruiters and secure you job interviews

This guide will take you through everything that needs to be included in your electrical engineer CV and comes with tailored CV example you can work from.

 

Guide contents

  • Electrical engineer CV example
  • Structuring and formatting your CV
  • Writing your CV profile
  • Detailing work experience
  • Your education
  • Skills required for your Electrical engineer CV

 

Electrical engineer CV example

Electrical engineer CV 1

 

Electrical engineer CV 2

 

This example CV demonstrates how to effectively structure and format your own Electrical engineer CV, so that it can be easily digested by busy employers, and quickly prove why you are the best candidate for the jobs you are applying to.

It also gives you a good idea of the type of skills, experience and qualifications that you need to be including and highlighting.

 

 

Electrical engineer CV structure & format

Your CV is the very first impression you'll make on a potential employer.

A disorganised, cluttered and barely readable CV could seriously decrease your chances of landing interviews, so it's essential to make sure yours is slick, professional and easy to navigate.

You can do this by employing a clear structure and formatting your content with some savvy formatting techniques - check them out below:

 

CV structure

 

Formatting Tips

  • Length: Think that submitting a five page CV will impress recruiters? You're wrong! Even if you've got tons of experience to brag about, recruiters don't have time to read through overly detailed CVs. Keep it short, concise and relevant - a CV length of 2 sides of A4 pages or less is perfect.
  • Readability: By clearly formatting your section headings (bold, or a different colour font, do the trick) and breaking up big chunks of text into snappy bullet points, time-strapped recruiters will be able to skim through your CV with ease.
  • Design: While it's okay to add your own spin to your CV, avoid overdoing the design. If you go for something elaborate, you might end up frustrating recruiters who, above anything, value simplicity and clarity.
  • Avoid photos: Logos, profile photos or other images aren't necessary and rarely add any value - save the space for written content, instead!

 

Structuring your CV

As you write your CV, divide and sub-head into the following sections:

  • Name and contact details - Always start with these, so employers know exactly how to get in touch with you.
  • CV profile - Add a short summary of your relevant experience, skills and achievements, which highlights your suitability.
  • Core skills section - A 2-3 columned list of your key skills.
  • Work experience - A detailed list of any relevant work experience, whether paid or voluntary.
  • Education - An overview of your academic background and any training you may have completed.
  • Hobbies and interests - A brief overview of your hobbies and interests, if they're relevant (optional).

 

Now I'll guide you through exactly what you should include in each CV section.

 

 

CV Contact Details

CV contact details

 

Kick-start your CV with your contact details, so recruiters can get in touch easily.

Here's what you should include:

  • Mobile number
  • Email address – Make sure it's professional, with no silly nicknames.
  • Location - Your town or city is sufficient, rather than a full address.
  • LinkedIn profile or portfolio URL - Ensure they've been updated and are looking slick and professional.

Quick tip: Avoid listing your date of birth, marital status or other irrelevant details - they're unnecessary.

 

 

Electrical engineer CV Profile

Your CV profile (or personal statement, if you're an entry-level applicant) provides a brief overview of your skills, abilities and suitability for a position.

It's ideal for busy recruiters and hiring managers, who don't want to waste time reading unsuitable applications.

Think of it as your personal sales pitch. You've got just a few lines to sell yourself and prove you're a great match for the job - make it count!

 

CV profile

 

Tips for creating an impactful CV profile:

  • Keep it brief: Recruiters have piles of CVs to read through and limited time to dedicate to each, so it pays to showcase your abilities in as few words as possible. 3-4 lines is ideal.
  • Tailor it: If recruiters don't see your suitability within a few seconds, they may close your CV straight away. Your CV profile should closely match the essential requirements listed in the job ad, so make sure to review them before you write it.
  • Don't add an objective: You only have a short space for your CV profile, so avoid writing down your career goals or objectives. If you think these will help your application, incorporate them into your cover letter instead.
  • Avoid cliches: "Determined team player who always gives 110%" might seem like a good way to fill up your CV profile, but generic phrases like this won't land you an interview. Recruiters hear them time and time again and have no real reason to believe them. Instead, pack your profile with your hard skills and tangible achievements instead.

 

What to include in your Electrical engineer CV profile?

  • Summary of experience: Demonstrate your suitability for your target jobs by giving a high level summary of your previous work experience, including the industries you have worked in, types of employer, and the type of roles you have previous experience of.
  • Relevant skills: Highlight your skills which are most relevant to Electrical engineer jobs, to ensure that recruiters see your most in-demand skills as soon as they open your CV.
  • Essential qualifications: If the jobs you are applying to require candidates to have certain qualifications, then you must add them in your profile to ensure they are seen by hiring managers.

 

Quick tip: Even the best of writers can overlook typos and spelling mistakes. Whilst writing your CV, use a free writing assistant tool, such as Grammarly, to help you avoid any silly errors.

 

Core skills section

Underneath your profile, create a core skills section to make your most relevant skills jump off the page at readers.

It should be made up of 2-3 columns of bullet points of your relevant skills.

Before you do this, look over the job description and make a list of any specific skills, specialisms or knowledge required.

Then, make sure to use your findings in your list. This will paint you as the perfect match for the role.

 

Core skills 

 


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Work experience/Career history

Now it's time to get stuck into your work experience, which should make up the bulk of your CV.

Begin with your current (or most recent) job, and work your way backwards.

If you've got too much experience to fit onto two pages, prioritise space for your most recent and relevant roles.

 

CV work experience

  

Structuring your roles

Your work experience section will be long, so it's important to structure it in a way which helps recruiters to quickly and easily find the information they need.

Use the 3-step structure, shown in the below example, below to achieve this.

  

Role descriptions

 

Outline

Firstly, give the reader some context by creating a punchy summary of the job as a whole.

You should mention what the purpose or goal of your role was, what team you were part of and who you reported to.

E.g.

“As Electrical Engineer of this construction site which is developing 350 new homes, I carry out relevant testing and inspection exercises of machinery and equipment, manage repairs minimising delays to the build schedule”

 

Key responsibilities

Next up, you should write a short list of your day-to-day duties within the job.

Recruiters are most interested in your sector-specific skills and knowledge, so highlight these wherever possible.

E.g.

  • Responsible for ensuring that routine maintenance is being carried out to all building site equipment
  • Liaise with the Engineering Manager daily ensuring machine ‘down time’ is kept to a minimum, and ensure the availability of spare machine parts whilst keeping costs to a minimum
  • Performing the daily activities on-site PPM tasks

 

Key achievements

Round up each role by listing 1-3 key achievements, accomplishments or results.

Wherever possible, quantify them using hard facts and figures, as this really helps to prove your value.

E.g.

  • Successfully diagnosed and repaired an integral part of the site’s main digger, ensuring the company saved £3.5million on a new piece of machinery
  • Acquired a new supplier for bespoke motors and parts for site machinery saving an overall £2.5million across the duration of the whole five-year build

 

Education

After your work experience, your education section should provide a detailed view of your academic background.

Begin with those most relevant to Electrical engineer jobs, such as vocational training or degrees.

If you have space, you can also mention your academic qualifications, such as A-Levels and GCSEs.

 

 

Interests and hobbies

The hobbies and interests CV section isn't mandatory, so don't worry if you're out of room by this point.

However, if you have an interesting hobby, or an interest that could make you seem more suitable for the role, then certainly think about adding.

Be careful what you include though... Only consider hobbies that exhibit skills that are required for roles as a Electrical engineer, or transferable workplace skills.

There is never any need to tell employers that you like to watch TV and eat out.

 

 


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Essential skills for your Electrical engineer CV

Tailoring your CV to the roles you are applying for is key to success, so make sure to read through the job descriptions and tailor your skills accordingly.

However, commonly desired Electrical engineer skills include:

Computer-aided design and softwareDemonstrate skill levels in CAD and engineering software and how you use them effectively for circuitry on project plans.

Design skillsAbility to manage design, safety and problem-solving to ensure safe installations.

Project managementShowcase your skills in all areas of project management from budgetary control to deadline management.

Testing and analysisExplain how you use testing, analysis and evaluation to ensure safety and functionality.

Innovation skillsDetail how you keep abreast of industry advancements and can use innovation skills to improve project success or efficiency.

 

 

Writing your Electrical engineer CV

An interview-winning CV for a Electrical engineer role, needs to be both visually pleasing and packed with targeted content.

Whilst it needs to detail your experience, accomplishments and relevant skills, it also needs to be as clear and easy to read as possible.

Remember to research the role and review the job ad before applying, so you're able to match yourself up to the requirements.

If you follow these guidelines and keep motivated in your job search, you should land an interview in no time.

Best of luck with your next application!