SOC Analyst CV example

Youre a talented SOC analyst (Security Operations Center) with an exceptional understanding of cybersecurity, but in order to prove this to the recruiter, you need to build a strong application.

However, if you’re more familiar with writing code than writing CVs, let us help. Below, well teach you how to write engaging content that showcases your skills and experience.

You can also check out our SOC analyst CV example for additional support.

 

 

 

SOC Analyst CV example

SOC Analyst CV 1

SOC Analyst CV 2

 

This is a good example of a SOC Analyst CV which is professionally formatted, and structured in a way that allows recruiters to easily find and understand the candidate’s key selling points.

Take some time to look at this CV and refer to it throughout the writing of your own CV for best results.

 

CV builder

 

SOC Analyst CV format and structure

The format and structure of your CV is important because it will determine how easy it is for recruiters and employers to read your CV.

If they can find the information they need quickly, they’ll be happy; but if they struggle, your application could be overlooked.

A simple and logical structure will always create a better reading experience than a complex structure, and with a few simple formatting tricks, you’ll be good to go.

 

How to write a CV

 

Tips for formatting your SOC Analyst CV

  • Length: Recruiters will be immediately put off by lengthy CVs – with hundreds of applications to read through, they simply don’t have the time! Grabbing their attention with a short, snappy and highly relevant CV is far more likely to lead to success. Aim for two sides of A4 or less.
  • Readability: Columns, lists, bullet points, bold text and subtle colour can all help to aid the readability of your CV. Your overarching goal should be to make the content as easy to read and navigate as possible, whilst also aiming to make your key skills and achievements stand out.
  • Design & format: Your CV needs to look professional, sleek and easy to read. A subtle colour palette, clear font and simple design are generally best for this, as fancy designs are often harder to navigate.
  • Photos: Don’t add profile photos to your CV unless you work in an industry or region which prefers to see them. Most employers in the UK will not need to see one.

 

Quick tip: Creating a professional CV style can be difficult and time-consuming when using Microsoft Word or Google Docs. To create a winning CV quickly, try our quick-and-easy CV Builder and use one of their eye-catching professional CV templates.

 

CV formatting tips

 

 

CV structure

As you write your CV, work to the simple but effective structure below:

  • Name and contact details – Pop them at the top of your CV, so it’s easy for recruiters to contact you.
  • CV profile – Write a snappy overview of what makes you a good fit for the role; discussing your key experience, skills and accomplishments.
  • Core skills section – Add a short but snappy list of your relevant skills and knowledge.
  • Work experience – A list of your relevant work experience, starting with your current role.
  • Education – A summary of your relevant qualifications and professional/vocational training.
  • Hobbies and interests – An optional sections, which you could use to write a short description of any relevant hobbies or interests.

Now you understand the basic layout of a CV, here’s what you should include in each section of yours.

 

Contact Details

Contact details

 

Write your contact details in the top corner of your CV, so that they’re easy to find but don’t take up too much space.

You only need to list your basic details, such as:

  • Mobile number
  • Email address
  • Location – Don’t list your full address. Your town or city, such as ‘Norwich’ or ‘Coventry’ is perfect.
  • LinkedIn profile or portfolio URL – Remember to update these before listing them on an application.

 

SOC Analyst CV Profile

Recruiters read through countless applications every day.

If they don’t find what they’re looking for quickly, they’ll simply move onto the next one.

That’s what makes your CV profile (or personal statement, if you’re an entry-level/graduate candidate) so important.

This short and snappy summary sits at the top of your CV, and should give a high-level overview of why you’re a good match for the job.

This way, you can ensure that busy recruiters see your suitability from the outset, and so, feel your CV is worth their time.

 

CV profile

 

How to write a good CV profile:

  • Make it short and sharp: Aim for a short, snappy paragraph of 3-5 lines. This is just enough room to showcase why you’d make the perfect hire, without going into excessive detail and overwhelming busy recruiters.
  • Tailor it: Recruiters can spot a generic, mass-produced CV at a glance – and they certainly won’t be impressed! Before you write your profile (and CV as a whole), read through the job advert and make a list of any skills, knowledge and experience required. You should then incorporate your findings throughout your profile and the rest of your CV.
  • Don’t add an objective: You only have a small space for your CV profile, so avoid writing down your career goals or objectives. If you think these will help your application, incorporate them into your cover letter instead.
  • Avoid generic phrases: Clichés like “blue-sky thinker with a go-getter attitude” might sound impressive to you, but they don’t actually tell the recruiter much about you. Concentrate on highlighting hard facts and skills, as recruiters are more likely to take these on board.

 

Example CV profile for SOC Analyst

Certified SOC Analyst with 15+ years of experience providing cybersecurity solutions and software integration for large corporations and external consultancies. Detail-oriented data analyst with a master’s degree in information security and Cybercrime from UCL. Proven track record of safeguarding critical pharmaceutical infrastructure through proactive threat detection with strong expertise in SIEM platforms, cyber threat intelligence, and security frameworks.

 

What to include in your SOC Analyst CV profile?

  • Experience overview: Showcase your aptitude for the job you are aiming for by giving a brief summary of your past work history, including the industries you have worked in, the kinds of employers you have served, and the roles you have held.
  • Targeted skills: Highlight your skills which are most relevant to SOC Analyst (Security Operations Center) jobs, to ensure that recruiters see your most in-demand skills as soon as they open your CV.
  • Important qualifications: If you have any qualifications which are highly relevant to SOC Analyst jobs, then highlight them in your profile so that employers do not miss them.

 

Quick tip: If you are finding it difficult to write an attention-grabbing CV profile, choose from hundreds of pre-written profiles across all industries, and add one to your CV with one click in our quick-and-easy CV Builder. All profiles are written by recruitment experts and easily tailored to suit your unique skillset.

 

Core skills section

Add a core skills section below your profile to draw attention to your most applicable skills and make them stand out to readers.

This should consist of 2-3 columns of bullet points that emphasise your relevant skills.

Before creating this section, review the job description and compile a list of any specific skills, specializations, or knowledge needed. Incorporate these findings into your list to portray yourself as the ideal candidate for the position.

 

Core skills section CV

 

Important skills for your SOC Analyst CV

Cybersecurity Knowledge – Maintaining an in-depth understanding of cybersecurity principles, including threats, vulnerabilities, and attack vectors, to detect and mitigate security incidents.

SIEM Tools – Proficiency in Security Information and Event Management (SIEM) tools like Splunk, LogRhythm, or QRadar to analyse and correlate security data.

Intrusion Detection Systems (IDS) – Configuring, monitoring, and responding to alerts from IDS/IPS systems to detect and prevent malicious activities.

Firewall Management – Configuring and managing firewalls to control network traffic and protect against unauthorised access.

Malware Analysis – Analysing malware samples to understand their behaviour, identify indicators of compromise (IoCs), and develop countermeasures.

Incident Response – Utilising knowledge of incident response procedures, including containment, eradication, and recovery processes, to mitigate security breaches effectively.

Forensics Analysis – Utilising digital forensics tools and techniques to investigate security incidents and breaches, preserving evidence for legal purposes.

Threat Intelligence – Utilising threat intelligence feeds and sources to stay updated on the latest cyber threats and vulnerabilities.

Vulnerability Assessment – Performing vulnerability assessments and penetration testing to identify and remediate weaknesses in systems and networks.

Compliance and Regulations – Maintaining familiarity with cybersecurity regulations and compliance frameworks, such as GDPR or ISO 27001, to ensure adherence to industry standards.

 

Quick tip: Our quick-and-easy CV Builder has thousands of in-demand skills for all industries and professions, that can be added to your CV in seconds – This will save you time and ensure you get noticed by recruiters.

 

CV builder

 

Work experience

Now it’s time to get stuck into your work experience, which should make up the bulk of your CV.

Begin with your current (or most recent) job, and work your way backwards.

If you’ve got too much experience to fit onto two pages, prioritise space for your most recent and relevant roles.

 

CV work experience

 

Structuring each job

The structure of your work experience section can seriously affect its impact.

This is generally the biggest section of a CV, and with no thought to structure, it can look bulky and important information can get lost.

Use my 3-step structure below to allow for easy navigation, so employers can find what they are looking for:

 

Role descriptions

 

Outline

Start with a brief summary of your role as a whole, as well as the type of company you worked for.

 

Key responsibilities

Using easy-to-read bullet points, note down your day-to-day responsibilities in the role.

Make sure to showcase how you used your hard sector skills and knowledge.

 

Key achievements

Round up each role by listing 1-3 key achievements, accomplishments or results.

Wherever possible, quantify them using hard facts and figures, as this really helps to prove your value.

 

Sample job description for SOC Analyst CV

Outline

Work as part of a multidisciplinary SOC team at leading multinational pharmaceutical company, CF Pharma, overseeing the cybersecurity of over 100 local and remote networks.

Key Responsibilities

  • Spearhead real-time monitoring and analysis of pharmaceutical networks, identifying and neutralising security threats to maintain data integrity
  • Work within a multidisciplinary team to develop and implement incident response strategies, minimising downtime, and potential breaches
  • Contribute to the refinement of SOC processes and procedures, adhering to MHRA standards
  • Produce comprehensive reports on threat landscape trends and analysis

 

Quick tip: Create impressive job descriptions easily in our quick-and-easy CV Builder by adding pre-written job phrases for every industry and career stage.

 

 

Education section

After your work experience, your education section should provide a detailed view of your academic background.

Begin with those most relevant to SOC Analyst jobs, such as vocational training or degrees.
If you have space, you can also mention your academic qualifications, such as A-Levels and GCSEs.

Focus on the qualifications that are most relevant to the jobs you are applying for.

 

Hobbies and interests

This section is entirely optional, so you’ll have to use your own judgement to figure out if it’s worth including.

If your hobbies and interests could make you appear more suitable for your dream job, then they are definitely worth adding.

Interests which are related to the industry, or hobbies like sports teams or volunteering, which display valuable transferable skills might be worth including.

 

CV builder

Once you’ve written your SOC Analyst (Security Operations Center) CV, you should proofread it several times to ensure that there are no typos or grammatical errors.

With a tailored punchy profile that showcases your relevant experience and skills, paired with well-structured role descriptions, you’ll be able to impress employers and land interviews.

Good luck with your next job application!