Corporate Receptionist CV example

Can you juggle a variety of administrative tasks such as answering calls, arranging meetings, responding to emails and filing important documents?

Then you could be a very welcome member of the team. Providing you can prove your abilities on your CV, that is.

To help you do this, we’ve put together a corporate CV example and detailed writing guide below, bursting with top tips and advice.

 

 

 

Corporate Receptionist CV example

Corporate Receptionist CV 1

Corporate Receptionist CV 2

 

This CV example showcases the optimal structure and format for your Corporate Receptionist CV, providing a pleasant reading experience for busy recruiters.

It also demonstrates the skills, experience and qualifications you should emphasize in your own CV to increase your chances of landing job interviews.

 

CV builder

 

Corporate Receptionist CV format and structure

In a highly competitive job market, recruiters and employers are often inundated with applications. If they can’t find what they’re looking for in your CV quickly, they may skip past your application and move on to the next one in their inbox

So, it’s crucial to structure and format your CV in a way that enables them to find your essential details with ease, even if they’re pressed for time.

 

How to write a CV

 

Tips for formatting your Corporate Receptionist CV

  • Length: Whether you’ve got one year or three decades of experience, your CV should never be more than two sides of A4. Recruiters are busy people who’re often juggling numerous roles and tasks, so they don’t have time to read lengthy applications. If you’re a recent graduate or don’t have much industry experience, one side of A4 is fine.
  • Readability: To help recruiters quickly skim through your CV, it’s important to format your section headings with bold or a different colour font and break up lengthy paragraphs into short sharp bullet points. This enables them to easily identify important information and assess your suitability.
  • Design & format: While it’s okay to add your own spin to your CV, avoid overdoing the design. If you go for something elaborate, you might end up frustrating recruiters who, above anything, value simplicity and clarity.
  • Photos: Recruiters can’t factor in appearance, gender or race into the recruitment process, so a profile photo is not usually needed. However, creative employers do like to see them, so you can choose to include one if you think it will add value to your CV .

 

Quick tip: Creating a professional CV style can be difficult and time-consuming when using Microsoft Word or Google Docs. To create a winning CV quickly, try our quick-and-easy CV Builder and use one of their eye-catching professional CV templates.

 

CV formatting tips

 

 

CV structure

When writing your CV, it’s important to structure the content into the following key sections to ensure easy digestion by busy recruiters and hiring managers:

  • Contact details: List your contact details at the top of your CV to prevent them from being overlooked.
  • Profile: Begin with an introductory paragraph that captures recruiters’ attention and summarises what you have to offer employers.
  • Work experience/career history: List your relevant work experience in reverse chronological order, starting with your current position.
  • Education: Provide a brief summary of your education and qualifications.
  • Interests and hobbies: An optional section to showcase any hobbies that highlight transferable skills relevant to your target jobs.

Now you understand the basic layout of a CV, here’s what you should include in each section of yours.

 

Contact Details

Contact details

 

Write your contact details in the top corner of your CV, so that they’re easy to find but don’t take up too much space.

You only need to list your basic details, such as:

  • Mobile number
  • Email address
  • Location – Don’t list your full address. Your town or city, such as ‘Norwich’ or ‘Coventry’ is perfect.
  • LinkedIn profile or portfolio URL – Remember to update these before listing them on an application.

 

Corporate Receptionist CV Profile

Your CV profile is the first thing recruiters will read – so your goal is to give them a reason to read onto the end of the document!

Create a short and snappy paragraph that showcases your key skills, relevant experience and impressive accomplishments.

Ultimately, it should prove to the reader that you’ve got what it takes to carry out the job.

 

CV profile

 

How to write a good CV profile:

  • Make it short and sharp: Recruiters have piles of CVs to read through and limited time to dedicate to each, so it pays to showcase your abilities in as few words as possible. 3-4 lines is ideal.
  • Tailor it: Not tailoring your profile (and the rest of your CV) to the role you’re applying for, is the worst CV mistake you could make. Before setting pen to paper, look over the job ad and make a note of the skills and experience required. Then, incorporate your findings throughout.
  • Don’t add an objective: Career goals and objectives are best suited to your cover letter, so don’t waste space with them in your CV profile.
  • Avoid generic phrases: If there’s one thing that’ll annoy a recruiter, it’s a clichè-packed CV. Focus on showcasing your hard skills, experience and the results you’ve gained in previous roles, which will impress recruiters far more.

 

Example CV profile for Corporate Receptionist

Friendly Corporate Receptionist with 7+ years of experience in delivering exception front desk services for business consulting organisations. Strong understanding security protocols aimed at guaranteeing workplace safety. Proven ability to discreetly handle confidential information, while adapting to changing situations and unforeseen circumstances in fast-paced office environments.

 

What to include in your Corporate Receptionist CV profile?

  • Experience overview: Demonstrate your suitability for your target jobs by giving a high level summary of your previous work work experience, including the industries you have worked in, types of employer, and the type of roles you have previous experience of.
  • Targeted skills: Make your most relevant Corporate Receptionist key skills clear in your profile. These should be tailored to the specific role you’re applying for – so make sure to check the job description first, and aim to match their requirements as closely as you can.
  • Important qualifications: Be sure to outline your relevant Corporate Receptionist qualifications, so that anyone reading the CV can instantly see you are qualified for the jobs you are applying to.

 

Quick tip: If you are finding it difficult to write an attention-grabbing CV profile, choose from hundreds of pre-written profiles across all industries, and add one to your CV with one click in our quick-and-easy CV Builder. All profiles are written by recruitment experts and easily tailored to suit your unique skillset.

 

Core skills section

To ensure that your most relevant skills catch the eye of readers, create a core skills section below your profile.

This section should be presented in 2-3 columns of bullet points highlighting your applicable skills. Before crafting this section, carefully examine the job description and create a list of any required skills, specialisms, or knowledge.

Use this list to include the necessary information in your section and present yourself as the ideal match for the position.

 

Core skills section CV

 

Important skills for your Corporate Receptionist CV

Professional Telephone Etiquette – Handling telephone calls with professionalism, including transferring calls and taking messages accurately.

Customer Service – Providing excellent customer service to visitors and clients, ensuring a positive first impression of the company.

Scheduling and Calendar Management – Managing appointments, meeting rooms, and company calendars efficiently.

Data Entry and Record Keeping – Accurately entering data into computer systems and maintaining records, such as visitor logs and contact details.

Email Correspondence – Handling email communications effectively, including sorting, prioritising, and responding to emails in a timely manner.

Office Equipment Operation – Using office equipment like photocopiers, scanners, and fax machines.

Microsoft Office Suite – Using Microsoft Office applications, particularly Word, Excel, and Outlook, for various administrative tasks.

Basic Accounting – Handling basic financial tasks such as processing invoices and managing petty cash.

Visitor Management – Greeting and assisting visitors, providing badges, and directing them to appropriate departments or individuals.

Confidentiality and Discretion – Maintaining confidentiality and exercising discretion in handling sensitive company information.

 

Quick tip: Our quick-and-easy CV Builder has thousands of in-demand skills for all industries and professions, that can be added to your CV in seconds – This will save you time and ensure you get noticed by recruiters.

 

CV builder

 

Work experience

Next up is your work experience section, which is normally the longest part of your CV.

Start with your current (or most recent) job and work your way backwards through your experience.

Can’t fit all your roles? Allow more space for your recent career history and shorten down descriptions for your older roles.

 
Work experience
 

Structuring each job

The structure of your work experience section can seriously affect its impact.

This is generally the biggest section of a CV, and with no thought to structure, it can look bulky and important information can get lost.

Use my 3-step structure below to allow for easy navigation, so employers can find what they are looking for:

 
Role descriptions
 

Outline

Start with a brief summary of your role as a whole, as well as the type of company you worked for.

 

Key responsibilities

Follow with a snappy list of bullet points, detailing your daily duties and responsibilities.

Tailor it to the role you’re applying for by mentioning how you put the target employer’s desired hard skills and knowledge to use in this role.

 

Key achievements

Round up each role by listing 1-3 key achievements, accomplishments or results.

Wherever possible, quantify them using hard facts and figures, as this really helps to prove your value.

 

Sample job description for Corporate Receptionist CV

Outline

Serve as the first point of contact for guests, clients, and employees when they enter the premises of a consultancy that specialises in sales solutions for health, safety, environmental, and technological marketplaces.

Key Responsibilities

  • Utilise security devices to monitor the entry and exit activities to ensure that only authorised individuals gain access.
  • Maintain a professional appearance and demeanour to create a positive first impression.
  • Welcome and assist all persons in warm and courteous manner, as well as issue visitor badges.
  • Answer and transfer calls to suitable departments or note down important messages as expected.

 

Quick tip: Create impressive job descriptions easily in our quick-and-easy CV Builder by adding pre-written job phrases for every industry and career stage.

 

 

Education section

Although there should be mentions of your highest and most relevant qualifications earlier on in your CV, save your exhaustive list of qualifications for the bottom.

If you’re an experienced candidate, simply include the qualifications that are highly relevant to Corporate Receptionist roles.

However, less experienced candidates can provide a more thorough list of qualifications, including A-Levels and GCSEs.

You can also dedicate more space to your degree, discussing relevant exams, assignments and modules in more detail, if your target employers consider them to be important.

 

Hobbies and interests

This section is entirely optional, so you’ll have to use your own judgement to figure out if it’s worth including.

If your hobbies and interests could make you appear more suitable for your dream job, then they are definitely worth adding.

Interests which are related to the industry, or hobbies like sports teams or volunteering, which display valuable transferable skills might be worth including.

 

CV builder

 

A strong, compelling CV is essential to get noticed and land interviews with the best employers.

To ensure your CV stands out from the competition, make sure to tailor it to your target role and pack it with sector-specific skills and results.

Remember to triple-check for spelling and grammar errors before hitting send.

Good luck with the job search!