General manager CV example

General manager CV example

General manager roles can be competitive to secure, so to give yourself the best chance of landing the job you need to effectively highlight your skills and put together a professional CV.

To help you do this, we’ve put together an example general manager CV and a step-by-step guide to get you started.

 

Guide contents

  • General manager CV example
  • Structuring and formatting your CV
  • Writing your CV profile
  • Detailing work experience
  • Your education
  • Skills required for your General manager CV

 

General manager CV example

General manager CV

 

General manager CV

 

Unsure of what your General manager CV should look like?

Take a good look at the CV example above to get familiar with the structure, layout and format of a professional CV.

As you can see, it provides plenty of relevant information about the applicant but is still very easy to read, which will please busy recruiters.

 

 

General manager CV structure & format

Your CV is the very first impression you'll make on a potential employer.

A disorganised, cluttered and barely readable CV could seriously decrease your chances of landing interviews, so it's essential to make sure yours is slick, professional and easy to navigate.

You can do this by employing a clear structure and formatting your content with some savvy formatting techniques - check them out below:

 

CV structure

 

Formatting Tips

  • Length: Think that submitting a five page CV will impress recruiters? You're wrong! Even if you've got tons of experience to brag about, recruiters don't have time to read through overly detailed CVs. Keep it short, concise and relevant - a CV length of 2 sides of A4 pages or less is perfect.
  • Readability: Recruiters appreciate CVs that they can quickly scan through without trouble. Ensure yours makes the cut by formatting your headings for attention (bold or coloured fonts should do the trick) and breaking up long paragraphs into smaller chunks or short, snappy bullet points.
  • Design: When it comes to CV design, it's best to keep things simple and sleek. While elaborate designs certainly command attention, it's not always for the right reasons! Readability is key, so whatever you choose to do, make sure you prioritise readability above everything.
  • Avoid photos: If your CV has photos, images or profile pictures, hit the delete button. They're not needed and won't add any value to your applications.

 

Structuring your CV

Divide your CV into the following major sections when writing it:

  • Name and contact details – Head your CV with your name and contact details, to let the reader know who you are and how to contact you.
  • CV profile – A brief paragraph which summarises your skills and experience and highlights why you're a good match for the role.
  • Core skills list – A snappy, bullet-pointed list of your most relevant skills.
  • Work experience – A structured list of your work experience in reverse chronological order.
  • Education – A summary of any relevant qualifications or professional training you've completed.
  • Hobbies and interests – An optional section, which should only be used if your hobbies are relevant to the jobs you're applying to.

 

Now I'll guide you through exactly what you should include in each CV section.

 

 

CV Contact Details

CV contact details

 

Start off your CV with a basic list of your contact details.

Here's what you should include:

  • Mobile number
  • Email address – It's often helpful to make a new email address, specifically for your job applications.
  • Location - Share your town or city; there's no need for a full address.
  • LinkedIn profile or portfolio URL - Make sure the information on them is coherent with your CV, and that they're up-to-date

Quick tip: Delete excessive details, such as your date of birth or marital status. Recruiters don't need to know this much about you, so it's best to save the space for your other CV sections.

 

 

General manager CV Profile

Recruiters read through countless applications every day.

If they don't find what they're looking for quickly, they'll simply move onto the next one.

That's what makes your CV profile (or personal statement, if you're an entry-level/graduate candidate) so important.

This short and snappy summary sits at the top of your CV, and should give a high-level overview of why you're a good match for the job.

This way, you can ensure that busy recruiters see your suitability from the outset, and so, feel your CV is worth their time.

 

CV profile

 

Tips for creating an impactful CV profile:

  • Keep it brief: When it comes to CV profile length, less is more, as recruiters are often time-strapped. Aim for around of 3-5 persuasive lines.
  • Tailor it: No matter how much time you put into your CV profile, it won't impress if it's irrelevant to the role you're applying for. Before you start writing, make a list of the skills, knowledge and experience your target employer is looking for. Then, make sure to mention them in your CV profile and throughout the rest of your application.
  • Don't add an objective: If you want to discuss your career objectives, save them for your cover letter, rather than wasting valuable CV profile space.
  • Avoid cliches: Focus on fact, not fluff. Phrases like "Committed and enthusiastic thought-leader" and "Dynamic problem solver" might sound fancy, but they'll do nothing for your application. Not only do they sound cheesy, but they have no substance - stick to real skills and facts

 

What to include in your General manager CV profile?

  • Summary of experience: Demonstrate your suitability for your target jobs by giving a high level summary of your previous work experience, including the industries you have worked in, types of employer, and the type of roles you have previous experience of.
  • Relevant skills: Highlight your skills which are most relevant to General manager jobs, to ensure that recruiters see your most in-demand skills as soon as they open your CV.
  • Essential qualifications: Be sure to outline your relevant General manager qualifications, so that anyone reading the CV can instantly see you are qualified for the jobs you are applying to.

 

Quick tip: Even the best of writers can overlook typos and spelling mistakes. Whilst writing your CV, use a free writing assistant tool, such as Grammarly, to help you avoid any silly errors.

 

Core skills section

Make sure that your most valuable skills aren’t missed by adding a bullet-pointed core skills section like the one below.

This should also be heavily targeted towards the role you're applying for.

For example, if the job advertisement lists certain skills as "essential", then you'd list them here.

This immediately helps the reader to see that you're a perfect match for the job.

 

Core skills 

 

 


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Work experience/Career history

By now, you'll have hooked the reader's attention and need to show them how you apply your skills and knowledge in the workplace, to benefit your employers.

So, starting with your most recent role and working backwards to your older roles, create a thorough summary of your career history to date.

If you've held several roles and are struggling for space, cut down the descriptions for your oldest jobs.

 

CV work experience

  

Structuring your roles

Recruiters will be keen to gain a better idea of where you've worked and how you apply your skill-set in the workplace.

However, if they're faced with huge, hard-to-read paragraphs, they may just gloss over it and move onto the next application.

To avoid this, use the simple 3-step role structure, as shown below:

  

Role descriptions

 

Outline

Start with a brief summary of your role as a whole, as well as the type of company you worked for.

E.g.

Managing all staff and operations for 200 room luxury hotel, reporting to hotel owner

 

Key responsibilities

Using easy-to-read bullet points, note down your day-to-day responsibilities in the role.

Make sure to showcase how you used your hard sector skills and knowledge.

E.g.

  • Creating and implementing hotel procedures, training all staff to oversee them

 

Key achievements

To finish off each role and prove the impact you made, list 1-3 stand out achievements, results or accomplishments.

This could be anything which had a positive outcome for the company you worked for, or perhaps a client/customer.

Where applicable, quantify your examples with facts and figures.

E.g.

  • Implemented new sales process which led to 75% increase in average sale value

 

Education

In your education section, make any degrees, qualifications or training which are relevant to General manager roles a focal point.

As well as mentioning the name of the organisation, qualification titles and dates of study, you should showcase any particularly relevant modules, assignments or projects.

Additionally, if you have room, you can provide a brief overview of your academic background, such as A-Levels and GCSEs.

 

 

Interests and hobbies

The hobbies and interests CV section isn't mandatory, so don't worry if you're out of room by this point.

However, if you have an interesting hobby, or an interest that could make you seem more suitable for the role, then certainly think about adding.

Be careful what you include though... Only consider hobbies that exhibit skills that are required for roles as a General manager, or transferable workplace skills.

There is never any need to tell employers that you like to watch TV and eat out.

 

 


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Get all of our Professional CV templates, Cover letters, LinkedIn templates, Interview questions and more...
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Essential skills for your General manager CV

Tailoring your CV to the roles you are applying for is key to success, so make sure to read through the job descriptions and tailor your skills accordingly.

However, commonly desired General manager skills include:

Leadership - As a general manager you’ll be expected to inspire and support your teams, motivating them to achieve common business goals.

Technical skills - This is a very varied role, so you’ll need a good range of technical skills from Microsoft Office to being able to operate crucial machinery and equipment.

Planning - Good planning and organisation are key skills to succeed as a general manager.

Decision-making - You’ll be required to make a lot of decisions on a daily basis, covering anything from budgets and marketing campaigns to how to tackle a problem or customer complaint.

Delegation and mediation - You can’t be everywhere at once so you need to be able to delegate tasks. You must also be able to mediate conflict between employees or customers.

 

 

Writing your General manager CV

A strong, compelling CV is essential to get noticed and land interviews with the best employers.

To ensure your CV stands out from the competition, make sure to tailor it to your target role and pack it with sector-specific skills and results.

Remember to triple-check for spelling and grammar errors before hitting send.

Good luck with the job search!