Occupational Health Nurse CV example

Are you looking for your next role as an occupational health nurse?

As these roles can be quite competitive, you need to go one step further to stand out.

Below, we’ll teach you how to showcase the skills, qualifications and qualities that will help you to excel in this field.

We’ll also provide an occupational health nurse CV example to guide you.

 

 

 

Occupational Health Nurse CV example

Occupational Health Nurse CV 1

Occupational Health Nurse CV 2

 

This CV example showcases the optimal structure and format for your Occupational Health Nurse CV, providing a pleasant reading experience for busy recruiters.

It also demonstrates the skills, experience and qualifications you should emphasize in your own CV to increase your chances of landing job interviews.

 

CV builder

 

Occupational Health Nurse CV format and structure

Hiring managers and recruiters are frequently overloaded with applications, and if they can’t identify the relevant information in your CV within a few seconds, your application may be overlooked.

To avoid this, it’s essential to format and structure your CV in a manner that makes it simple to pick out the most important information, even if the reader is in a rush.

 

How to write a CV

 

Tips for formatting your Occupational Health Nurse CV

  • Length: Your CV should always be limited to two sides of A4, regardless of whether you have a year or three decades of experience. With recruiters juggling multiple responsibilities, they don’t have time to sift through lengthy applications.
  • Readability: Make sure your CV is easy to read and looks professional by applying some simple formatting tricks. Bullet points are great for making large paragraphs more digestible, while formatting your headings with bold or coloured text will help the reader to find the information they need, with speed.
  • Design & format: The saying ‘less is more’ couldn’t be more applicable to CVs. Readability is key, so avoid overly complicated designs and graphics. A subtle colour palette and easy-to-read font is all you need!
  • Photos: Headshot photos aren’t required in a CV by most employers, but some creative and artistic industries like to see them. If you decide to include one, make sure you look smart and professional in the picture.

 

Quick tip: Creating a professional CV style can be difficult and time-consuming when using Microsoft Word or Google Docs. To create a winning CV quickly, try our quick-and-easy CV Builder and use one of their eye-catching professional CV templates.

 

CV formatting tips

 

 

CV structure

To make it easy for busy recruiters and hiring managers to digest your CV, divide the content into several key sections when writing it:

  • Contact details: Always list your contact details at the very top to avoid them being missed.
  • Profile: Start with an introductory paragraph that catches recruiters’ attention and summarises your offerings.
  • Work experience/career history: List your relevant work experience in reverse chronological order, starting with your current position.
  • Education: Provide a concise summary of your education and qualifications.
  • Interests and hobbies: You can include an optional section to showcase any hobbies that demonstrate transferable skills.

Now you understand the basic layout of a CV, here’s what you should include in each section of yours.

 

Contact Details

Contact details

 

Make it easy for recruiters to get in touch, by heading your CV with your contact details.

There’s no need for excessive details – just list the basics:

  • Mobile number
  • Email address – Use a professional address with no nicknames.
  • Location – Just write your general location, such as ‘London’ or ‘Cardiff’ – there’s no need to put your full address.
  • LinkedIn profile or portfolio URL

 

Occupational Health Nurse CV Profile

Your CV profile is basically a short introductory paragraph, which summarises your key selling points and highlights why you’d make a good hire.

So, write a well-rounded summary of what you do, what your key skills are, and what relevant experience you have.

It needs to be short, snappy and punchy and, ultimately, entice the reader to read the rest of your CV.

 

CV profile

 

How to write a good CV profile:

  • Make it short and sharp: Aim for a short, snappy paragraph of 3-5 lines. This is just enough room to showcase why you’d make the perfect hire, without going into excessive detail and overwhelming busy recruiters.
  • Tailor it: If recruiters don’t see your suitability within a few seconds, they may close your CV straight away. Your CV profile should closely match the essential requirements listed in the job ad, so make sure to review them before you write it.
  • Don’t add an objective: Avoid discussing your career goals in your CV profile – if you think they’re necessary, briefly mention them in your cover letter instead.
  • Avoid generic phrases: Focus on fact, not fluff. Phrases like “Committed and enthusiastic thought-leader” and “Dynamic problem solver” might sound fancy, but they’ll do nothing for your application. Not only do they sound cheesy, but they have no substance – stick to real skills and facts

 

Example CV profile for Occupational Health Nurse

Dedicated Occupational Health Nurse with 6+ years of specialist experience providing preventative and proactive healthcare services to employees in the construction industry. Possesses a PGDip in Occupational Health Nursing and proficiency in workplace health assessments, injury prevention, and health promotion. Committed to maintaining a healthy and safe work environment for employees in compliance with UK regulations with demonstrated success in reducing workplace injuries and employee engagement.

 

What to include in your Occupational Health Nurse CV profile?

  • Experience overview: Showcase your aptitude for the job you are aiming for by giving a brief summary of your past work history, including the industries you have worked in, the kinds of employers you have served, and the roles you have held.
  • Targeted skills: Make your most relevant Occupational Health Nurse key skills clear in your profile. These should be tailored to the specific role you’re applying for – so make sure to check the job description first, and aim to match their requirements as closely as you can.
  • Important qualifications: If you have any qualifications which are highly relevant to Occupational Health Nurse jobs, then highlight them in your profile so that employers do not miss them.

 

Quick tip: If you are finding it difficult to write an attention-grabbing CV profile, choose from hundreds of pre-written profiles across all industries, and add one to your CV with one click in our quick-and-easy CV Builder. All profiles are written by recruitment experts and easily tailored to suit your unique skillset.

 

Core skills section

In addition to your CV profile, your core skills section provides an easily digestible snapshot of your skills – perfect for grabbing the attention of busy hiring managers.

As Occupational Health Nurse jobs might receive a huge pile of applications, this is a great way to stand out and show off your suitability for the role.

It should be made up of 2-3 columns of bullet points and be made up of skills that are highly relevant to the jobs you are targeting.

 

Core skills section CV

 

Important skills for your Occupational Health Nurse CV

Health Assessment – Conducting comprehensive health assessments and physical examinations of employees to determine fitness for work.

Occupational Health Legislation – Maintaining knowledge of UK occupational health laws and regulations, ensuring compliance with workplace health and safety requirements.

Workplace Hazard Identification – Identifying workplace hazards and assessing their potential health risks to employees.

Injury and Illness Management – Managing work-related injuries and illnesses, including first aid, treatment, and return-to-work programs.

Health Surveillance – Conducting health surveillance programs, such as hearing tests, lung function tests, and blood pressure monitoring, to monitor employees’ health.

Vaccination and Immunisation – Maintaining knowledge of recommended vaccines and immunisation programs for occupational health, including travel vaccinations.

Ergonomics Assessment – Assessing workplace ergonomics to prevent musculoskeletal disorders and provide ergonomic recommendations.

Substance Abuse Testing – Performing drug and alcohol testing and managing substance abuse programs in the workplace.

Health Promotion – Promoting employee health and well-being through wellness programs, health education, and lifestyle interventions.

Medical Records Management – Utilising knowledge of medical recordkeeping and data privacy laws to maintain confidential and accurate health records.

 

Quick tip: Our quick-and-easy CV Builder has thousands of in-demand skills for all industries and professions, that can be added to your CV in seconds – This will save you time and ensure you get noticed by recruiters.

 

CV builder

 

Work experience

Recruiters will be itching to know more about your relevant experience by now.

Kick-start this section with your most recent (or current) position, and work your way backwards through your history.

You can include voluntary and freelance work, too – as long as you’re honest about the nature of the work.

 
Work experience
 

Structuring each job

Lengthy, unbroken chunks of text is a recruiters worst nightmare, but your work experience section can easily end up looking like that if you are not careful.

To avoid this, use my tried-and-tested 3-step structure, as illustrated below:

 
Role descriptions
 

Outline

Begin with a summary of your role, detailing what the purpose of your job was, who you reported to and what size of team you were part of (or led).

 

Key responsibilities

Using easy-to-read bullet points, note down your day-to-day responsibilities in the role.

Make sure to showcase how you used your hard sector skills and knowledge.

 

Key achievements

Lastly, add impact by highlight 1-3 key achievements that you made within the role.

Struggling to think of an achievement? If it had a positive impact on your company, it counts.

For example, you might increased company profits, improved processes, or something simpler, such as going above and beyond to solve a customer’s problem.

 

Sample job description for Occupational Health Nurse CV

Outline

Work for a leading construction company, supporting managers with the correct safeguarding of the health and wellbeing of their 150 employees.

Key Responsibilities

  • Conduct comprehensive pre-placement health assessments for new employees, ensuring they meet job-related health requirements
  • Develop tailored employee wellness programs, including health workshops and fitness initiatives
  • Administer and interpret health surveillance tests, such as audiometry and spirometry, in compliance with regulatory standards
  • Collaborate with HR and line managers to create return-to-work plans for employees recovering from illnesses or injuries

 

Quick tip: Create impressive job descriptions easily in our quick-and-easy CV Builder by adding pre-written job phrases for every industry and career stage.

 

 

Education section

In your education section, make any degrees, qualifications or training which are relevant to Occupational Health Nurse roles a focal point.

As well as mentioning the name of the organisation, qualification titles and dates of study, you should showcase any particularly relevant modules, assignments or projects.

 

Hobbies and interests

Although this is an optional section, it can be useful if your hobbies and interests will add further depth to your CV.

Interests which are related to the sector you are applying to, or which show transferable skills like leadership or teamwork, can worth listing.

On the other hand, generic hobbies like “going out with friends” won’t add any value to your application, so are best left off your CV.

 

CV builder

 

When putting together your Occupational Health Nurse CV, there are a few key points to remember

Always tailor your CV to the target role, even if it means creating several versions for different roles.

Additionally, remember that the structure and format of your CV needs just as much attention as the content.

Good luck with your job search!