Please find attached my CV… 43 ways to say it

Andrew Fennell Andrew Fennell

When you apply for jobs, you want to ensure that your CV gets opened by the recruiter.

But the phrase “please find attached my CV” is a bit dated and can seem impersonal.

So, you probably want to say something more modern and friendly, right?

If you’re looking for another way to say “please find attached my CV”, we’ve listed 43 examples in this article for you to choose from.

 

 

43 ways to say “Please find attached my cv”

Rather than saying “please find attached my CV,” here are some more original ways to go about it.

The following examples are simple, but pass on the same message without being too cliché:

  • My CV is attached for your consideration.
  • Please see my CV (attached) for more information.
  • I have attached my CV, let me know what you think.
  • My CV is attached to this email, let me know if you have any questions.
  • I have attached my CV for you to take a look at.
  • Here’s my CV, I’ve attached it to this email.
  • I’ve sent my CV along with my cover letter.
  • You can find my CV attached to my email.
  • Please refer to my attached CV for further information.
  • I have included my CV as an attachment.
  • For further information, I’ve attached my CV.
  • You can refer to my attached CV for further information.
  • I’ve attached my CV for further reference.
  • I’ll include my CV as an attachment for further details.
  • I’ve sent through my CV as an attachment if you’d like further information.
  • For more details, you’ll find my CV attached to this email.
  • I’ve added my CV as an attachment, do let me know if you have any problems accessing it.
  • You’ll find my CV attached to this email for further information.
  • For more information on my skills and background, I’ve attached my CV.
  • You can see my full work history via my CV, which I’ve attached to this email.
  • For more details, I’ve included my CV as an attachment.
  • My CV is attached to this email and available for download.
  • For my full work history, you’ll find my CV attached to this email.
  • As per the job description, I’ve attached my CV.
  • As instructed, I’ve included my CV as an attachment.
  • Please consider my CV which I have attached to my application.
  • For further details, please refer to my attached CV.
  • You can refer to my attached CV for more information.
  • I’ve attached my CV for reference.
  • I’ve attached my CV to this email as per the job description.
  • You’ll find my CV attached alongside my cover letter and application.
  • Let me know if you have any questions about my attached CV.
  • As requested, I’ve included my CV as an attachment.
  • You can download or view my CV for further reference, which I’ve attached to my application.
  • You can find my CV attached to this email for further details.
  • For more detailed information, my CV is attached for your consideration.
  • You can find more information on my attached CV.
  • You’re welcome to take a look at my attached CV.
  • My attached CV includes further information.
  • Should it be of interest, I have attached my CV.
  • If you’d like more information, I have included my CV for further reference.
  • For more information on my candidacy, my CV is available as an attachment.
  • Feel free to take a look at my attached CV for more information.

 

CV builder

 

Why use the phrase “Please find attached my CV”?

If you’re applying to a job online, you’re going to want to direct the recruiter to your CV, as that’s where they’ll be able to find your achievements, skills and work experience – AKA; the important stuff.

By saying “please find attached my CV” (or something similar) you’re sending your potential employer to the information that is most likely to land you an interview.

Plus, recruiters are busy all day – if you don’t point out that you’ve attached your CV, they might think you didn’t send one in some cases.

 

Where to write cover letter

 

When to use the phrase “Please find attached my CV”?

There are a number of instances where you should use the phrase “please find attached my CV” (or a more original version of it.) Here are the main occasions where you should use this phrase:

 

Emailing your CV for a job application

While some company recruitment websites have online, box-ticking job applications, some employers prefer to solicit CVs via email instead.

So, if a job advert offers only an email address for applications, it’s going to be your CV – along with the quality of your cover letter – that will determine whether or not you get an interview.

In this instance, you’ll want to make sure to direct the recruiter to your CV when you send your email. Make sure that you also write an effective cover letter and sign off your email professionally.

 

Making applications on job websites

Many job applications now consist of an online form on the company website. You might be asked to answer questions, fill in your details or complete a short test.

Most online job applications will also allow you to include attachments before sending your details off, and you should always use this feature to add your CV when given the option. If there’s a small “cover letter” section in the job application (where you can write freestyle), you should use this space to indicate that you’ve attached your CV for consideration.

 

Sending your CV to recruiters on LinkedIn

If you’re reaching out to recruiters on LinkedIn, it’s essential that you send over a CV alongside your message. Simply having your LinkedIn profile on display isn’t enough – the recruiter might want to forward your details or your CV to a third party, so it should be attached in readable PDF or Word format.

When closing your email, sign off by politely instructing the recruiter to take a look at your CV for consideration. Your CV will be their only point of reference when recommending you to relevant employers, so it’s important to include it.

 

 

Sending a speculative application

If you’re interested in working for a particular company but they don’t post regular vacancies, sending a speculative application is always an option.

If you’re sending a speculative application, you should always include a CV. You’re much more likely to get a response from an employer if you demonstrate that you possess a competitive skillset that could be valuable to their organisation.

Send along a polite enquiry and explain that you’ve attached your CV for consideration (without being pushy.)

 

Checks to make when attaching your CV

Before you send off that application or email, you’ll want to make sure that everything is attached, named, and signed off correctly. Before clicking “send”, take a look at the list below and tick off accordingly:

  • Check your CV is attached – Luckily, many email servers now recognise the word “attached” in an email and will notify you if you forget to attach something. However, never rely on technology alone. You should always double check that you’ve actually attached your CV before sending off your email. It’s a rookie mistake, but it’s more common than you might think.
  • Name the file properly – When attaching files, name them accordingly and professionally– e.g. “David Smith CV” – adding your own name for reference and helping recruiters to store and find your CV. Make sure there’s no random numbers, weird letters or errors in the file name.
  • Spellcheck your email and CV – You only get once chance to make a good impression. Sending off a CV or email littered with errors is going to immediately turn off a recruiter, so always proofread your documents first. You can double check your CV using a tool such as Grammarly, which can help to pick up any small errors that might otherwise go undetected by a conventional spellchecker.
  • Add a professional signature to your email – If you want to appear professional, add a professional signature to your email. A professional signature lends credibility to your application and sets the tone for your correspondence with the organisation or recruiter.
  • Use a Word or PDF document – There’s no use in sending an immaculate, well-written CV if the recruiter is unable to open it. With so many job applications to go through every day, a recruiter isn’t likely to follow up with you if they are unable to open your CV. Avoid any editable software (such as Google docs) and stick to a Microsoft Word document or a PDF.
  • Follow up with non-responders – If you haven’t heard back from a company or recruiter after a couple of weeks, you can always follow up and ask for an update on your email or application. Some organisations will be happy to provide feedback or give a reason as to why your application was either unsuccessful or refused. This feedback can be helpful in creating a better CV.

 

Conclusion

Whether you’re sending off a job application or sending outreach emails, it’s always a good idea to direct prospective employers to your CV. There’s only so much a cover letter can do – you want your skills and work experience to be the main focus of your candidacy.

Next time you’re attaching a CV, use one of our above examples to point the recruiter in the right direction. And don’t forget to spellcheck and proofread your CV, email and cover letter before clicking “send!”