Driving Instructor CV example

Teaching the rules of the road requires patience and a commitment to safety.

Your Driving Instructor CV should mirror your ability to educate and instil confidence in new drivers.

Use our guide to navigate through your experiences, with an example that accelerates your potential into a compelling narrative.

 

 

 

Driving Instructor CV example

Driving Instructor CV 1

 

This CV example demonstrates the type of info you should be including within your Driving Instructor CV, as well as how to format and layout the content in a way which looks professional and is easy for time-strapped recruiters to read.

This is the look and feel you should be aiming for, so remember to refer back to it throughout your CV writing process.

 

CV builder

 

Driving Instructor CV format and structure

The format and structure of your CV is important because it will determine how easy it is for recruiters and employers to read your CV.

If they can find the information they need quickly, they’ll be happy; but if they struggle, your application could be overlooked.

A simple and logical structure will always create a better reading experience than a complex structure, and with a few simple formatting tricks, you’ll be good to go.

 

How to write a CV

 

Tips for formatting your Driving Instructor CV

  • Length: It’s essential to keep your CV concise, regardless of whether you have one year or thirty years of experience. Recruiters are frequently managing multiple roles and responsibilities and do not have the luxury of reading lengthy CVs. Therefore, limit your CV to two sides of A4. If you have little industry experience, one page is sufficient.
  • Readability: Help out time-strapped recruiters by formatting your CV for easy reading. Using lots of bullet points and lists will help them to skim through your info, while clearly formatted headings will allow them to navigate towards the content which is most useful to them.
  • Design & format: While it’s okay to add your own spin to your CV, avoid overdoing the design. If you go for something elaborate, you might end up frustrating recruiters who, above anything, value simplicity and clarity.
  • Photos: Headshot photos aren’t required in a CV by most employers, but some creative and artistic industries like to see them. If you decide to include one, make sure you look smart and professional in the picture.

 

Quick tip: Creating a professional CV style can be difficult and time-consuming when using Microsoft Word or Google Docs. To create a winning CV quickly, try our quick-and-easy CV Builder and use one of their eye-catching professional CV templates.

 

CV formatting tips

 

 

CV structure

As you write your CV, work to the simple but effective structure below:

  • Name and contact details – Pop them at the top of your CV, so it’s easy for recruiters to contact you.
  • CV profile – Write a snappy overview of what makes you a good fit for the role; discussing your key experience, skills and accomplishments.
  • Core skills section – Add a short but snappy list of your relevant skills and knowledge.
  • Work experience – A list of your relevant work experience, starting with your current role.
  • Education – A summary of your relevant qualifications and professional/vocational training.
  • Hobbies and interests – An optional sections, which you could use to write a short description of any relevant hobbies or interests.

Now you understand the basic layout of a CV, here’s what you should include in each section of yours.

 

Contact Details

Contact details

 

Write your contact details in the top corner of your CV, so that they’re easy to find but don’t take up too much space.

You only need to list your basic details, such as:

  • Mobile number
  • Email address
  • Location – Don’t list your full address. Your town or city, such as ‘Norwich’ or ‘Coventry’ is perfect.
  • LinkedIn profile or portfolio URL – Remember to update these before listing them on an application.

 

Driving Instructor CV Profile

To immediately capture the attention of recruiters, begin your CV with a powerful profile (or personal statement for junior applicants).

This is a brief introductory paragraph that summarises your skills, experience, and knowledge.

It should position you as the ideal candidate for the job and encourage recruiters to read on.

 

CV profile

 

How to write a good CV profile:

  • Make it short and sharp: The best CV profiles are short, sharp and highly relevant to the target role. For this reason, it’s best to write 3-4 lines of high-level information, as anything over might be missed.
  • Tailor it: No matter how much time you put into your CV profile, it won’t impress if it’s irrelevant to the role you’re applying for. Before you start writing, make a list of the skills, knowledge and experience your target employer is looking for. Then, make sure to mention them in your CV profile and throughout the rest of your application.
  • Don’t add an objective: You only have a small space for your CV profile, so avoid writing down your career goals or objectives. If you think these will help your application, incorporate them into your cover letter instead.
  • Avoid generic phrases: Focus on fact, not fluff. Phrases like “Committed and enthusiastic thought-leader” and “Dynamic problem solver” might sound fancy, but they’ll do nothing for your application. Not only do they sound cheesy, but they have no substance – stick to real skills and facts

 

Example CV profile for Driving Instructor

Results-driven Driving Instructor with a proven track record in delivering personalised driving lessons and preparing learners for practical and theory tests. Skilled in fostering a safe and confident driving experience and following DVLA guidelines, demonstrated in above average pass rates among students.

 

What to include in your Driving Instructor CV profile?

  • Experience overview: Start with a brief summary of your relevant experience so far. How many years experience do you have? What type of companies have you worked for? What industries/sectors have you worked in? What are your specialisms?
  • Targeted skills: Employers need to know what skills you can bring to their organisation, and ideally they want to see skills that match their job vacancy. So, research your target roles thoroughly and add the most important Driving Instructor skills to your profile.
  • Important qualifications: If the jobs you are applying to require candidates to have certain qualifications, then you must add them in your profile to ensure they are seen by hiring managers.

 

Quick tip: If you are finding it difficult to write an attention-grabbing CV profile, choose from hundreds of pre-written profiles across all industries, and add one to your CV with one click in our quick-and-easy CV Builder. All profiles are written by recruitment experts and easily tailored to suit your unique skillset.

 

Core skills section

To ensure that your most relevant skills catch the eye of readers, create a core skills section below your profile.

This section should be presented in 2-3 columns of bullet points highlighting your applicable skills. Before crafting this section, carefully examine the job description and create a list of any required skills, specialisms, or knowledge.

Use this list to include the necessary information in your section and present yourself as the ideal match for the position.

 

Core skills section CV

 

Important skills for your Driving Instructor CV

Traffic Law Expertise – In-depth knowledge of UK traffic laws and regulations to provide accurate and up-to-date information during driving lessons.

Vehicle Operation Proficiency – Practiced in operating various types of vehicles, including manual and automatic transmissions, ensuring comprehensive driving instruction.

Risk Management – Ability to assess and manage risks during driving lessons, promoting safety and instilling defensive driving techniques in learners.

Effective Communication – Clear and concise communication abilities to provide instructions, feedback, and guidance to learners from diverse backgrounds and learning styles.

Patience and Adaptability – Capacity to remain patient and adaptable while teaching individuals with varying levels of experience and learning paces.

Teaching Strategies – Utilisation of effective teaching methods and strategies to cater to the unique needs and abilities of each learner.

Route Planning – Expertise in planning diverse driving routes to expose learners to different traffic conditions, road types, and challenges.

Vehicle Maintenance Knowledge – Basic understanding of vehicle maintenance to address minor issues and ensure the safety and reliability of the training vehicle.

Evaluation and Feedback – Capability to conduct thorough assessments of learners’ driving abilitiy, providing constructive feedback and creating personalised improvement plans.

Crisis Management – Ability to handle unexpected situations and emergencies calmly, ensuring the safety of both the learner and others on the road.

 

Quick tip: Our quick-and-easy CV Builder has thousands of in-demand skills for all industries and professions, that can be added to your CV in seconds – This will save you time and ensure you get noticed by recruiters.

 

CV builder

 

Work experience

By now, you’ll have hooked the reader’s attention and need to show them how you apply your skills and knowledge in the workplace, to benefit your employers.

So, starting with your most recent role and working backwards to your older roles, create a thorough summary of your career history to date.

If you’ve held several roles and are struggling for space, cut down the descriptions for your oldest jobs.

 
Work experience
 

Structuring each job

Lengthy, unbroken chunks of text is a recruiters worst nightmare, but your work experience section can easily end up looking like that if you are not careful.

To avoid this, use my tried-and-tested 3-step structure, as illustrated below:

 
Role descriptions
 

Outline

Begin with a summary of your role, detailing what the purpose of your job was, who you reported to and what size of team you were part of (or led).

 

Key responsibilities

Use bullet points to detail the key responsibilities of your role, highlighting hard skills, software and knowledge wherever you can.

Keep them short and sharp to make them easily digestible by readers.

 

Key achievements

Round up each role by listing 1-3 key achievements, accomplishments or results.

Wherever possible, quantify them using hard facts and figures, as this really helps to prove your value.

 

Sample job description for Driving Instructor CV

Outline

Work for a reputable driving school based in central Sheffield, providing tailored driving lessons to a diverse range of pupils in both automatic and manual cars.

Key Responsibilities

  • Craft personalised lesson plans for learner drivers of all ages
  • Utilise visual aids and digital simulators to enhance the learning experience
  • Remain up-to-date with changes in driving regulations and test procedures, ensuring alignment with DVLA guidelines
  • Administer realistic mock tests to assess and track learner progress

 

Quick tip: Create impressive job descriptions easily in our quick-and-easy CV Builder by adding pre-written job phrases for every industry and career stage.

 

 

Education section

Next up, you should list your education and qualifications.

This can include your formal qualifications (a degree, A-Levels and GCSEs), as well as sector-specific Driving Instructor qualifications and/or training.

While school leavers and recent grads should include a lot of detail here to make up for the lack of work experience, experienced candidates may benefit from a shorter education section, as your work experience section will be more important to recruiters.

 

Hobbies and interests

This section is entirely optional, so you’ll have to use your own judgement to figure out if it’s worth including.

If your hobbies and interests could make you appear more suitable for your dream job, then they are definitely worth adding.

Interests which are related to the industry, or hobbies like sports teams or volunteering, which display valuable transferable skills might be worth including.

 

CV builder

 

An interview-winning CV for a Driving Instructor role, needs to be both visually pleasing and packed with targeted content.

Whilst it needs to detail your experience, accomplishments and relevant skills, it also needs to be as clear and easy to read as possible.

Remember to research the role and review the job ad before applying, so you’re able to match yourself up to the requirements.

If you follow these guidelines and keep motivated in your job search, you should land an interview in no time.

Best of luck with your next application!