Scrum master CV example

Srum master CV example

Scrum master roles working in Agile environments can be lucrative, but the job market can be extremely competitive.

You need a thoughtfully constructed scrum master CV to open the doors to that next big opportunity.

This guide provides an example scrum master CV, as well as detailed CV-writing guidance, ensuring you land lots of interviews.

 

Guide contents

  • Scrum master CV example
  • Structuring and formatting your CV
  • Writing your CV profile
  • Detailing work experience
  • Your education
  • Skills required for your Scrum master CV

 

Scrum master CV example

Scrum master CV 1

 

Scrum master CV 2

 

Before you start writing your own CV, take a look at the example Scrum master CV above to give yourself a basic understanding of the style and format that recruiters and hiring managers prefer to see.

Also, take note of the type of content that is included to impress recruiters, and how the most relevant information is made prominent.

 

 

Scrum master CV structure & format

First impressions count, so a sloppy, disorganised and difficult-to-read CV won't do you any favours.

Instead, perfect the format and structure of your CV by working to a pre-defined structure and applying some simple formatting tricks to ease readability.

Don't underestimate the importance of this step; if your CV lacks readability, your written content won't be able to shine through.

 

CV structure

 

Formatting Tips

  • Length: While there's no 'official' CV length rule, the majority of recruiters agree that less is more. Aim for two pages of A4 or less. This is just enough room to showcase your suitability to the role, without overwhelming recruiters with irrelevant or excessive content.
  • Readability: Recruiters appreciate CVs that they can quickly scan through without trouble. Ensure yours makes the cut by formatting your headings for attention (bold or coloured fonts should do the trick) and breaking up long paragraphs into smaller chunks or short, snappy bullet points.
  • Design: The saying 'less is more' couldn't be more applicable to CVs. Readability is key, so avoid overly complicated designs and graphics. A subtle colour palette and easy-to-read font is all you need!
  • Avoid photos: If your CV has photos, images or profile pictures, hit the delete button. They're not needed and won't add any value to your applications.

 

Structuring your CV

When writing your CV, break up the content into the following key sections, to ensure it can be easily digested by busy recruiters and hiring managers:
  • Contact details – Always list these at the very top of your CV - you don’t want them to be missed!
  • Profile – An introductory paragraph, intended to grab recruiters attention and summarise your offering.
  • Work experience / career history – Working from your current role and working backwards, list your relevant work experience.
  • Education – Create a snappy summary of your education and qualifications.
  • Interest and hobbies – An optional section to document any hobbies that demonstrate transferable skills.

 

Now I'll guide you through exactly what you should include in each CV section.

 

 

CV Contact Details

CV contact details

 

Tuck your contact details into the corner of your CV, so that they don't take up too much space.

Stick to the basic details, such as:

  • Mobile number
  • Email address – It should sound professional, such as your full name.
  • Location -Just write your rough location, rather than your full address.
  • LinkedIn profile or portfolio URL - If you include these, ensure they're sleek, professional and up-to-date.

 

 

Scrum master CV Profile

Your CV profile is basically a short introductory paragraph, which summarises your key selling points and highlights why you'd make a good hire.

So, write a well-rounded summary of what you do, what your key skills are, and what relevant experience you have.

It needs to be short, snappy and punchy and, ultimately, entice the reader to read the rest of your CV.

 

CV profile

 

Tips for creating an impactful CV profile:

  • Keep it brief: The best CV profiles are short, sharp and highly relevant to the target role. For this reason, it's best to write 3-4 lines of high-level information, as anything over might be missed.
  • Tailor it: Recruiters can spot a generic, mass-produced CV at a glance - and they certainly won't be impressed! Before you write your profile (and CV as a whole), read through the job advert and make a list of any skills, knowledge and experience required. You should then incorporate your findings throughout your profile and the rest of your CV.
  • Don't add an objective: Career goals and objectives are best suited to your cover letter, so don't waste space with them in your CV profile.
  • Avoid cliches: Focus on fact, not fluff. Phrases like "Committed and enthusiastic thought-leader" and "Dynamic problem solver" might sound fancy, but they'll do nothing for your application. Not only do they sound cheesy, but they have no substance - stick to real skills and facts

 

What to include in your Scrum master CV profile?

  • Summary of experience: Start with a brief summary of your relevant experience so far. How many years experience do you have? What type of companies have you worked for? What industries/sectors have you worked in? What are your specialisms?
  • Relevant skills: Employers need to know what skills you can bring to their organisation, and ideally they want to see skills that match their job vacancy. So, research your target roles thoroughly and add the most important Scrum master skills to your profile.
  • Essential qualifications: Be sure to outline your relevant Scrum master qualifications, so that anyone reading the CV can instantly see you are qualified for the jobs you are applying to.

 

Quick tip: Your CV is your first impression on recruiters, so it's vital to avoid spelling and grammar mistakes. Use a free writing assistant tool, like Grammarly, to check over your CV before hitting send.

 

Core skills section

Underneath your profile, create a core skills section to make your most relevant skills jump off the page at readers.

It should be made up of 2-3 columns of bullet points of your relevant skills.

Before you do this, look over the job description and make a list of any specific skills, specialisms or knowledge required.

Then, make sure to use your findings in your list. This will paint you as the perfect match for the role.

 

Core skills

 

 


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Work experience/Career history

By now, you'll have hooked the reader's attention and need to show them how you apply your skills and knowledge in the workplace, to benefit your employers.

So, starting with your most recent role and working backwards to your older roles, create a thorough summary of your career history to date.

If you've held several roles and are struggling for space, cut down the descriptions for your oldest jobs.

 

CV work experience

  

Structuring your roles

If you don't pay attention to the structure of your career history section, it could quickly become bulky and overwhelming.

Get in recruiters' good books by creating a pleasant reading experience, using the 3-step structure below:

  

Role descriptions

 

Outline

Start with a brief summary of your role as a whole, as well as the type of company you worked for.

E.g.

“Leading numerous large scale software development projects within the enterprise solution space across a range of industries”

 

Key responsibilities

Follow with a snappy list of bullet points, detailing your daily duties and responsibilities.

Tailor it to the role you're applying for by mentioning how you put the target employer's desired hard skills and knowledge to use in this role.

E.g.

  • Guiding the team on agile principles and practices, and how to use them to deliver valuable outcomes
  • Assessing the agile maturity of the team and helping them improve, achieving higher levels of maturity at a pace that is sustainable and comfortable for them

 

Key achievements

Finish off by showcasing 1-3 key achievements made within the role.

This could be anything that had a positive effect on your company, clients or customers, such as saving time or money, receiving exemplary feedback or receiving an award.

E.g.

  • Developed an initiative tracking system to effectively monitor teams progress, including burndown, velocity and release forecasting saving the company 40 hours during quarterly reporting
  • Monitored and managed dependencies on other teams and external projects to ensure potential issues are resolved, in doing this issue resolution was up by 50% year on year

 

Education

Although there should be mentions of your highest and most relevant qualifications earlier on in your CV, save your exhaustive list of qualifications for the bottom.

If you’re an experienced candidate, simply include the qualifications that are highly relevant to Scrum master roles.

However, less experienced candidates can provide a more thorough list of qualifications, including A-Levels and GCSEs.

You can also dedicate more space to your degree, discussing relevant exams, assignments and modules in more detail, if your target employers consider them to be important.

 

 

Interests and hobbies

This section is entirely optional, so you'll have to use your own judgement to figure out if it's worth including.

If your hobbies and interests could make you appear more suitable for your dream job, then they are definitely worth adding.

Interests which are related to the industry, or hobbies like sports teams or volunteering, which display valuable transferable skills might be worth including.

 

 


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Essential skills for your Scrum master CV

Tailoring your CV to the roles you are applying for is key to success, so make sure to read through the job descriptions and tailor your skills accordingly.

However, commonly desired Scrum master skills include:

 

Scrum and Agile skillsIn addition to your Scrum Master qualification, you need to showcase your Scrum and Agile skills in practice.

TerminologyShowcase your knowledge of specific terminology, but also how you adapt this to communicate effectively with all stakeholders.

CollaborationIt is vital to show that you know how to facilitate success through collaboration and aligning others to overall goals and objectives.

Organisational skillsGive room on your CV to highlight your abilities to implement clear but complex organisational systems, as well as how you have ensured deadlines are met.

Coaching skillsShowcase how you support and enable others to follow Agile systems using conflict management, teaching, patience and communication.

 

 

Writing your Scrum master CV

An interview-winning CV for a Scrum master role, needs to be both visually pleasing and packed with targeted content.

Whilst it needs to detail your experience, accomplishments and relevant skills, it also needs to be as clear and easy to read as possible.

Remember to research the role and review the job ad before applying, so you're able to match yourself up to the requirements.

If you follow these guidelines and keep motivated in your job search, you should land an interview in no time.

Best of luck with your next application!