Physiotherapist CV example

Physiotherapist CV example

There is a high level of competition for physiotherapy roles in popular settings, so you need an exceptional physiotherapist CV in order to prove that you should be called for interview.

In this guide we give you an example physiotherapist CV, as well as bringing you the insights you need in order to write your own successful CV.

We cover everything you need to know, including:

 

Guide contents

  • Physiotherapist CV example
  • Structuring and formatting your CV
  • Writing your CV profile
  • Detailing work experience
  • Your education
  • Skills required for your Physiotherapist CV

 

Physiotherapist CV example

Physiotherapist CV

 

Physiotherapist CV 2

 

Before you start writing your own CV, take a look at the example Physiotherapist CV above to give yourself a basic understanding of the style and format that recruiters and hiring managers prefer to see.

Also, take note of the type of content that is included to impress recruiters, and how the most relevant information is made prominent.

 

 

Physiotherapist CV structure & format

The format and structure of your CV is important because it will determine how easy it is for recruiters and employers to read your CV.

If they can find the information they need quickly, they'll be happy; but if they struggle, your application could be overlooked.

A simple and logical structure will always create a better reading experience than a complex structure, and with a few simple formatting tricks, you'll be good to go. Check them out below:

 

CV structure

 

Formatting Tips

  • Length: Two sides of A4 makes for the the perfect CV length, though one page is okay for less experienced applicants. This forces you to make sure that every single sentence adds value to your CV and ensures you avoid waffle.
  • Readability: Recruiters appreciate CVs that they can quickly scan through without trouble. Ensure yours makes the cut by formatting your headings for attention (bold or coloured fonts should do the trick) and breaking up long paragraphs into smaller chunks or short, snappy bullet points.
  • Design: When it comes to CV design, it's best to keep things simple and sleek. While elaborate designs certainly command attention, it's not always for the right reasons! Readability is key, so whatever you choose to do, make sure you prioritise readability above everything.
  • Avoid photos: Ditch logos, images or profile photos. Not only do they take up valuable space, but they may even distract recruiters from your important written content.

 

Structuring your CV

As you write your CV, divide and sub-head into the following sections:

  • Name and contact details - Always start with these, so employers know exactly how to get in touch with you.
  • CV profile - Add a short summary of your relevant experience, skills and achievements, which highlights your suitability.
  • Core skills section - A 2-3 columned list of your key skills.
  • Work experience - A detailed list of any relevant work experience, whether paid or voluntary.
  • Education - An overview of your academic background and any training you may have completed.
  • Hobbies and interests - A brief overview of your hobbies and interests, if they're relevant (optional).

 

Now I'll guide you through exactly what you should include in each CV section.

 

 

CV Contact Details

CV contact details

 

Make it easy for recruiters to get in touch, by heading your CV with your contact details.

There's no need for excessive details - just list the basics:
  • Mobile number
  • Email address – Use a professional address with no nicknames.
  • Location – Just write your your general location, such as 'London' or 'Cardiff' – there’s no need to put your full address.
  • LinkedIn profile or portfolio URL - Make sure they're looking sleek and up-to-date, though!

 

 

Physiotherapist CV Profile

Recruiters read through countless applications every day.

If they don't find what they're looking for quickly, they'll simply move onto the next one.

That's what makes your CV profile (or personal statement, if you're an entry-level/graduate candidate) so important.

This short and snappy summary sits at the top of your CV, and should give a high-level overview of why you're a good match for the job.

This way, you can ensure that busy recruiters see your suitability from the outset, and so, feel your CV is worth their time.

 

CV profile

 

Tips for creating an impactful CV profile:

  • Keep it brief: Recruiters are busy, so to ensure your profile is actually read, it's best to keep it short and snappy. 3-5 punchy lines makes for the perfect profile.
  • Tailor it: Before writing your CV, make sure to do some research. Figure out exactly what your desired employers are looking for and make sure that you are making those requirements prominent in your CV profile, and throughout.
  • Don't add an objective: If you want to discuss your career objectives, save them for your cover letter, rather than wasting valuable CV profile space.
  • Avoid cliches: "Determined team player who always gives 110%" might seem like a good way to fill up your CV profile, but generic phrases like this won't land you an interview. Recruiters hear them time and time again and have no real reason to believe them. Instead, pack your profile with your hard skills and tangible achievements instead.

 

What to include in your Physiotherapist CV profile?

  • Summary of experience: Recruiters will want to know what type of companies you’ve worked for, industries you have knowledge of, and the type of work you’ve carried out in the past, so give them a summary of this in your profile.
  • Relevant skills: Highlight your skills which are most relevant to Physiotherapist jobs, to ensure that recruiters see your most in-demand skills as soon as they open your CV.
  • Essential qualifications: If the jobs you are applying to require candidates to have certain qualifications, then you must add them in your profile to ensure they are seen by hiring managers.

 

Quick tip: Even the best of writers can overlook typos and spelling mistakes. Whilst writing your CV, use a free writing assistant tool, such as Grammarly, to help you avoid any silly errors.

 

Core skills section

Underneath your profile, create a core skills section to make your most relevant skills jump off the page at readers.

It should be made up of 2-3 columns of bullet points of your relevant skills.

Before you do this, look over the job description and make a list of any specific skills, specialisms or knowledge required.

Then, make sure to use your findings in your list. This will paint you as the perfect match for the role.

 

Core skills 

 


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Work experience/Career history

Recruiters will be itching to know more about your relevant experience by now.

Kick-start this section with your most recent (or current) position, and work your way backwards through your history.

You can include voluntary and freelance work, too - as long as you're honest about the nature of the work.

 

CV work experience

  

Structuring your roles

Recruiters will be keen to gain a better idea of where you've worked and how you apply your skill-set in the workplace.

However, if they're faced with huge, hard-to-read paragraphs, they may just gloss over it and move onto the next application.

To avoid this, use the simple 3-step role structure, as shown below:

  

Role descriptions

 

Outline

Start with a brief summary of your role as a whole, as well as the type of company you worked for.

E.g.

“Part of the Physiotherapy team at leading clinic delivering a wide range of treatment to patient’s enabling them to recover from injuries ”

 

Key responsibilities

Next, write up a punchy list of your daily duties and responsibilities, using bullet points.

Wherever you can, point out how you put your hard skills and knowledge to use - especially skills which are applicable to your target role.

E.g.

  • Evaluating the medical history and the movement and functional abilities of new patients
  • Developing treatment plans based on medical diagnoses and prescriptions
  • Providing patients with massage therapy to relieve soft tissue pain

 

Key achievements

To finish off each role and prove the impact you made, list 1-3 stand out achievements, results or accomplishments.

This could be anything which had a positive outcome for the company you worked for, or perhaps a client/customer.

Where applicable, quantify your examples with facts and figures.

E.g.

  • Coordinated the use and launch of a new patient app at our clinic, designed to measure a patient’s recovery progress, resulting in saving 10 hours per week in the clinic for both parties, and creating five new weekly treatment slots in the diary
  • Moved the clinic from a mostly paper-based operation to an electronic one, saving the receptionist 14 hours a week in productivity and reducing our phone bill by a third as less follow up calls are being made

 

Education

Although there should be mentions of your highest and most relevant qualifications earlier on in your CV, save your exhaustive list of qualifications for the bottom.

If you’re an experienced candidate, simply include the qualifications that are highly relevant to Physiotherapist roles.

However, less experienced candidates can provide a more thorough list of qualifications, including A-Levels and GCSEs.

You can also dedicate more space to your degree, discussing relevant exams, assignments and modules in more detail, if your target employers consider them to be important.

 

 

Interests and hobbies

This section is entirely optional, so you'll have to use your own judgement to figure out if it's worth including.

If your hobbies and interests could make you appear more suitable for your dream job, then they are definitely worth adding.

Interests which are related to the industry, or hobbies like sports teams or volunteering, which display valuable transferable skills might be worth including.

 

 


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Essential skills for your Physiotherapist CV

Tailoring your CV to the roles you are applying for is key to success, so make sure to read through the job descriptions and tailor your skills accordingly.

However, commonly desired Physiotherapist skills include:

OrganisationDemonstrate that you can plan, prepare, run and report on physiotherapy sessions within a wider treatment framework.

Anatomical and physical skillsShowcase your knowledge, especially specialist level skills in particular treatments, injuries or body areas.

Technical skillsList any specific technical skills you have in your field such as ultrasound or gym equipment use.

Communication skillsYou need to display a wide range of communication skills from the ability to build rapport with patients and educating them about their condition, through to writing reports and liaising with medical professionals at varying levels.

Physical fitnessPhysiotherapists need to show on their CV that they have a high level of personal fitness and wellbeing.

 

 

Writing your Physiotherapist CV

When putting together your Physiotherapist CV, there are a few key points to remember.

Always tailor your CV to the target role, even if it means creating several versions for different roles.

Additionally, remember that the structure and format of your CV needs just as much attention as the content.

Remember to triple-check for spelling and grammar errors before hitting send. If you're unsure, consult Grammarly - it's free!

Good luck with your job search!