Event coordinator CV example

Event coordinator CV example

Competition for event coordinator roles is tough.

Your ability to create an impactful event coordinator CV will determine your success in the job market.

So that you can succeed in getting an interview, this guide gives you an example event coordinator CV an become irresistible to employers.

 

Guide contents

  • Event coordinator CV example
  • Structuring and formatting your CV
  • Writing your CV profile
  • Detailing work experience
  • Your education
  • Skills required for your Event coordinator CV

 

Event coordinator CV example

Event coordinator CV 1

 

Event coordinator CV 2

 

Before you start writing your own CV, take a look at the example Event coordinator CV above to give yourself a basic understanding of the style and format that recruiters and hiring managers prefer to see.

Also, take note of the type of content that is included to impress recruiters, and how the most relevant information is made prominent.

 

 

Event coordinator CV structure & format

If you focus on the written content of your CV but ignore how it actually looks, your efforts could end up wasted.

No matter how suitable you are for the role, no recruiter wants to spend time squinting and trying to navigate a badly designed and disorganised CV.

Instead, make sure to organise your content into a simple structure and spend some time formatting it for ease of reading - it'll get you in recruiter's good books from the get-go!

 

CV structure

 

Formatting Tips

  • Length: Recruiters will be immediately put off by lengthy CVs - with hundreds of applications to read through, they simply don't have the time! Grabbing their attention with a short, snappy and highly relevant CV is far more likely to lead to success. Aim for two sides of A4 or less.
  • Readability: Columns, lists, bullet points, bold text and subtle colour can all help to aid the readability of your CV. Your overarching goal should be to make the content as easy to read and navigate as possible, whilst also aiming to make your key skills and achievements stand out.
  • Design: Don't waste time adding fancy designs to your CV. It generally adds no value to your application and may even end up distracting recruiters away from the important written content.
  • Avoid photos: It's tempting to add a profile photo or images to your CV, especially if you're struggling to fill up the page - but it's best avoided! They won't add any value to your application and, as are not a requirement the UK, so recruiters do not expect it, or want to see it.

 

Structuring your CV

As you write your CV, work to the simple but effective structure below:

  • Name and contact details - Pop them at the top of your CV, so it's easy for recruiters to contact you.
  • CV profile - Write a snappy overview of what makes you a good fit for the role; discussing your key experience, skills and accomplishments.
  • Core skills section - Add a short but snappy list of your relevant skills and knowledge.
  • Work experience - A list of your relevant work experience, starting with your current role.
  • Education - A summary of your relevant qualifications and professional/vocational training.
  • Hobbies and interests - An optional sections, which you could use to write a short description of any relevant hobbies or interests.

 

Now I'll guide you through exactly what you should include in each CV section.

 

 

CV Contact Details

CV contact details

 

Kick-start your CV with your contact details, so recruiters can get in touch easily.

Here's what you should include:

  • Mobile number
  • Email address – Make sure it's professional, with no silly nicknames.
  • Location - Your town or city is sufficient, rather than a full address.
  • LinkedIn profile or portfolio URL - Ensure they've been updated and are looking slick and professional.

Quick tip: Avoid listing your date of birth, marital status or other irrelevant details - they're unnecessary.

 

 

Event coordinator CV Profile

Your CV profile (or personal statement, if you're an entry-level applicant) provides a brief overview of your skills, abilities and suitability for a position.

It's ideal for busy recruiters and hiring managers, who don't want to waste time reading unsuitable applications.

Think of it as your personal sales pitch. You've got just a few lines to sell yourself and prove you're a great match for the job - make it count!

 

CV profile

 

Tips for creating an impactful CV profile:

  • Keep it brief: Recruiters have piles of CVs to read through and limited time to dedicate to each, so it pays to showcase your abilities in as few words as possible. 3-4 lines is ideal.
  • Tailor it: Before writing your CV, make sure to do some research. Figure out exactly what your desired employers are looking for and make sure that you are making those requirements prominent in your CV profile, and throughout.
  • Don't add an objective: Avoid discussing your career goals in your CV profile - if you think they're necessary, briefly mention them in your cover letter instead.
  • Avoid cliches: If your CV is riddled with clichès like "Dynamic thought-leader", hit that delete button. Phrases like these are like a broken record to recruiters, who read them countless times per day. Hard facts, skills, knowledge and results are sure to yield far better results.

 

What to include in your Event coordinator CV profile?

  • Summary of experience: Recruiters will want to know what type of companies you’ve worked for, industries you have knowledge of, and the type of work you’ve carried out in the past, so give them a summary of this in your profile.
  • Relevant skills: Employers need to know what skills you can bring to their organisation, and ideally they want to see skills that match their job vacancy. So, research your target roles thoroughly and add the most important Event coordinator skills to your profile.
  • Essential qualifications: Be sure to outline your relevant Event coordinator qualifications, so that anyone reading the CV can instantly see you are qualified for the jobs you are applying to.

 

Quick tip: If spelling and grammar are not a strong point of yours, make use of a writing assistant tool like Grammarly. It'll help you avoid overlooking spelling mistakes and grammar errors and, best of all, is completely free!

 

Core skills section

Next, you should create a bullet pointed list of your core skills, formatted into 2-3 columns.

Here, you should focus on including the most important skills or knowledge listed in the job advertisement.

This will instantly prove that you're an ideal candidate, even if a recruiter only has time to briefly scan your CV.

 

Core skills 

 


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Work experience/Career history

Now that recruiters have a good overview of your skills and abilities, you need to jump into the detail of your career history.

Give them a more thorough insight into what you can do by creating a detailed list of your relevant experience.

Start with your current role, and work backwards through all the relevant positions you've held.

This could be freelance, contract or voluntary work too; as long as it's related to the role you're applying for.

 

CV work experience

  

Structuring your roles

Your work experience section will be long, so it's important to structure it in a way which helps recruiters to quickly and easily find the information they need.

Use the 3-step structure, shown in the below example, below to achieve this.

  

Role descriptions

 

Outline

Provide a brief overview of the job as a whole, such as what the overriding purpose of your job was and what type of company you worked for.

E.g.

“Organised events for London’s largest boutique events companies specialising in Not-for-Profit’s. Coordinating and managing large corporate events to increase customers branding and donations through fundraisers. ”

 

Key responsibilities

Next up, you should write a short list of your day-to-day duties within the job.

Recruiters are most interested in your sector-specific skills and knowledge, so highlight these wherever possible.

E.g.

  • Corresponded with customers to understand the requirements of the event to ensure that all expectations are met to the highest standard.
  • Created plans for the logistics of the events included venues, caterers, suppliers, staff, timelines and costs for the customer which are tailored to the customers’ requirements.
  • Negotiated the best deals with all vendors and venues for customers to ensure that the event runs within the budget.

 

Key achievements

Round up each role by listing 1-3 key achievements, accomplishments or results.

Wherever possible, quantify them using hard facts and figures, as this really helps to prove your value.

E.g.

  • Planned, organised and managed a fundraiser event for children with disabilities for 2000 guests which raised over £500,000.
  • Negotiated rates and contracts with vendors by creating a preferred supplier agreement that saved Function Event Ltd £50,000 per annum.

 

Education

Although there should be mentions of your highest and most relevant qualifications earlier on in your CV, save your exhaustive list of qualifications for the bottom.

If you’re an experienced candidate, simply include the qualifications that are highly relevant to Event coordinator roles.

However, less experienced candidates can provide a more thorough list of qualifications, including A-Levels and GCSEs.

You can also dedicate more space to your degree, discussing relevant exams, assignments and modules in more detail, if your target employers consider them to be important.

 

 

Interests and hobbies

The hobbies and interests CV section isn't mandatory, so don't worry if you're out of room by this point.

However, if you have an interesting hobby, or an interest that could make you seem more suitable for the role, then certainly think about adding.

Be careful what you include though... Only consider hobbies that exhibit skills that are required for roles as a Event coordinator, or transferable workplace skills.

There is never any need to tell employers that you like to watch TV and eat out.

 

 


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Essential skills for your Event coordinator CV

Tailoring your CV to the roles you are applying for is key to success, so make sure to read through the job descriptions and tailor your skills accordingly.

However, commonly desired Event coordinator skills include:

 

  • Planning and organisationWithout a doubt, your event coordinator CV must clearly underpin your planning and organisational skills in a range of settings and scenarios.
  • Networking Your CV must showcase how you network effectively, drawing on exceptional interpersonal skills applied in a variety of ways to the benefit of your clients.
  • Adaptability It’s important that you can display how you are able to adapt to difficulties and opportunities with resilience and speed.
  • Creativity The most adept event coordinators are able to apply their creativity skills in a number of different ways.
  • Customer service Your CV must include how you manage different customer, supplier and client relationships with dedication, trust and enthusiasm.

 

 

Writing your Event coordinator CV

When putting together your Event coordinator CV, there are a few key points to remember.

Always tailor your CV to the target role, even if it means creating several versions for different roles.

Additionally, remember that the structure and format of your CV needs just as much attention as the content.

Remember to triple-check for spelling and grammar errors before hitting send. If you're unsure, consult Grammarly - it's free!

Good luck with your job search!