Cashier CV example

Cashier CV example

Employers often have lots of applicants to choose from, when recruiting for cashier positions.

So, in order to get an interview for your chosen role, you’ll need an attention-grabbing cashier CV.

This guide will help you write an attractive CV by explaining what you must include to wow shop managers… and it also includes an example cashier CV.

 

Guide contents

  • Cashier CV example
  • Structuring and formatting your CV
  • Writing your CV profile
  • Detailing work experience
  • Your education
  • Skills required for your Cashier CV

 

Cashier CV example

Cashier CV 1

 

Cashier CV 2

 

This a good example of a Cashier CV which contains all of the information that an employer would need to know, and presents it in a well- structured, easy-to-read manner.

Take some time to look at this CV and refer to it throughout the writing of your own CV for best results.

 

 

Cashier CV structure & format

First impressions count, so a sloppy, disorganised and difficult-to-read CV won't do you any favours.

Instead, perfect the format and structure of your CV by working to a pre-defined structure and applying some simple formatting tricks to ease readability.

Don't underestimate the importance of this step; if your CV lacks readability, your written content won't be able to shine through.

 

CV structure

 

Formatting Tips

  • Length: Whether you've got one year or three decades of experience, your CV should never be more than two sides of A4. Recruiters are busy people who're often juggling numerous roles and tasks, so they don't have time to read lengthy applications. If you're a recent graduate or don't have much industry experience, one side of A4 is fine.
  • Readability: By clearly formatting your section headings (bold, or a different colour font, do the trick) and breaking up big chunks of text into snappy bullet points, time-strapped recruiters will be able to skim through your CV with ease.
  • Design: Don't waste time adding fancy designs to your CV. It generally adds no value to your application and may even end up distracting recruiters away from the important written content.
  • Avoid photos: It's tempting to add a profile photo or images to your CV, especially if you're struggling to fill up the page - but it's best avoided! They won't add any value to your application and, as are not a requirement the UK, so recruiters do not expect it, or want to see it.

 

Structuring your CV

When writing your CV, break up the content into the following key sections, to ensure it can be easily digested by busy recruiters and hiring managers:
  • Contact details – Always list these at the very top of your CV - you don’t want them to be missed!
  • Profile – An introductory paragraph, intended to grab recruiters attention and summarise your offering.
  • Work experience / career history – Working from your current role and working backwards, list your relevant work experience.
  • Education – Create a snappy summary of your education and qualifications.
  • Interest and hobbies – An optional section to document any hobbies that demonstrate transferable skills.

 

Now I'll guide you through exactly what you should include in each CV section.

 

 

CV Contact Details

CV contact details

 

Tuck your contact details into the corner of your CV, so that they don't take up too much space.

Stick to the basic details, such as:

  • Mobile number
  • Email address – It should sound professional, such as your full name.
  • Location -Just write your rough location, rather than your full address.
  • LinkedIn profile or portfolio URL - If you include these, ensure they're sleek, professional and up-to-date.

 

 

Cashier CV Profile

Your CV profile is basically a short introductory paragraph, which summarises your key selling points and highlights why you'd make a good hire.

So, write a well-rounded summary of what you do, what your key skills are, and what relevant experience you have.

It needs to be short, snappy and punchy and, ultimately, entice the reader to read the rest of your CV.

 

CV profile

 

Tips for creating an impactful CV profile:

  • Keep it brief: Aim for a short, snappy paragraph of 3-5 lines. This is just enough room to showcase why you'd make the perfect hire, without going into excessive detail and overwhelming busy recruiters.
  • Tailor it: Recruiters can spot a generic, mass-produced CV at a glance - and they certainly won't be impressed! Before you write your profile (and CV as a whole), read through the job advert and make a list of any skills, knowledge and experience required. You should then incorporate your findings throughout your profile and the rest of your CV.
  • Don't add an objective: Career goals and objectives are best suited to your cover letter, so don't waste space with them in your CV profile.
  • Avoid cliches: Cheesy clichès and generic phrases won't impress recruiters, who read the same statements several times per day. Impress them with your skill-set, experience and accomplishments instead!

 

What to include in your Cashier CV profile?

  • Summary of experience: To give employers an idea of your capabilities, show them your track record by giving an overview of the types of companies you have worked for in the past and the roles you have carried out for previous employers – but keep it high level and save the details for your experience section.
  • Relevant skills: Make your most relevant Cashier key skills clear in your profile. These should be tailored to the specific role you're applying for — so make sure to check the job description first, and aim to match their requirements as closely as you can.
  • Essential qualifications: Be sure to outline your relevant Cashier qualifications, so that anyone reading the CV can instantly see you are qualified for the jobs you are applying to.

 

Quick tip: If spelling and grammar are not a strong point of yours, make use of a writing assistant tool like Grammarly. It'll help you avoid overlooking spelling mistakes and grammar errors and, best of all, is completely free!

 

Core skills section

Next, you should create a bullet pointed list of your core skills, formatted into 2-3 columns.

Here, you should focus on including the most important skills or knowledge listed in the job advertisement.

This will instantly prove that you're an ideal candidate, even if a recruiter only has time to briefly scan your CV.

 

Core skills 

 


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Work experience/Career history

Now it's time to get stuck into your work experience, which should make up the bulk of your CV.

Begin with your current (or most recent) job, and work your way backwards.

If you've got too much experience to fit onto two pages, prioritise space for your most recent and relevant roles.

 

CV work experience

  

Structuring your roles

If you don't pay attention to the structure of your career history section, it could quickly become bulky and overwhelming.

Get in recruiters' good books by creating a pleasant reading experience, using the 3-step structure below:

  

Role descriptions

 

Outline

Start with a brief summary of your role as a whole, as well as the type of company you worked for.

E.g.

“Worked alongside a large team of Customer Assistants to provide consistent and exceptional customer service, within the largest retail chain in the UK.”

 

Key responsibilities

Next, write up a punchy list of your daily duties and responsibilities, using bullet points.

Wherever you can, point out how you put your hard skills and knowledge to use - especially skills which are applicable to your target role.

E.g.

  • Cash handling including processing payments by cash, card and contactless, managing an average of 100 transactions per shift
  • Run the checkout efficiently, ensuring the queue is kept to a minimum to allow customers to be served quickly and support a positive customer experience
  • Manage customer complaints through to resolution, ensuring the customer leaves the store feeling satisfied and happy to return

 

Key achievements

Lastly, add impact by highlight 1-3 key achievements that you made within the role.

Struggling to think of an achievement? If it had a positive impact on your company, it counts.

For example, you might increased company profits, improved processes, or something simpler, such as going above and beyond to solve a customer's problem.

E.g.

  • Consistently achieved a minimum of 20 loyalty card sign ups per week, in turn encouraging repeat business to the store

 

Education

Next up, you should list your education and qualifications.

This can include your formal qualifications (a degree, A-Levels and GCSEs), as well as sector-specific Cashier qualifications and/or training.

While school leavers and recent grads should include a lot of detail here to make up for the lack of work experience, experienced candidates may benefit from a shorter education section, as your work experience section will be more important to recruiters.

 

 

Interests and hobbies

This section is entirely optional, so you'll have to use your own judgement to figure out if it's worth including.

If your hobbies and interests could make you appear more suitable for your dream job, then they are definitely worth adding.

Interests which are related to the industry, or hobbies like sports teams or volunteering, which display valuable transferable skills might be worth including.

 

 


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Essential skills for your Cashier CV

Tailoring your CV to the roles you are applying for is key to success, so make sure to read through the job descriptions and tailor your skills accordingly.

However, commonly desired Cashier skills include:

 

NumeracyYour cashier CV must demonstrate that you have an aptitude for mental arithmetic and confident money handling.

Customer serviceExplain how you communicate effectively with customers and ensure their satisfaction, as well as handling difficult situations.

Time managementYou’ll need to show that you can work efficiently without compromising accuracy.

POS systemsKnowledge of POS systems will be advantageous and should be listed clearly on your CV.

AdaptabilityIt is good to show that you can be productive during busy times and when there is a lull in custom, proving your value across the board.

 

 

Writing your Cashier CV

Once you've written your Cashier CV, you should proofread it several times to ensure that there are no typos or grammatical errors.

With a tailored punchy profile that showcases your relevant experience and skills, paired with well-structured role descriptions, you'll be able to impress employers and land interviews.

Good luck with your next job application!