Occupational Therapy Assistant CV example

Embarking on a career as an Occupational Therapy Assistant requires a CV that reflects your dedication to patient support and care.

To give you a head start, we’ve crafted this concise guide full of practical tips and insights.

Dive into our Occupational Therapy Assistant CV example for a dose of inspiration to create your own standout application.

 

 

 

Occupational Therapy Assistant CV example

Occupational Therapy Assistant CV 1

Occupational Therapy Assistant CV 2

 

Before you start writing your CV, take a look at the example Occupational Therapy Assistant CV above to give yourself a good idea of the style and format that works best in today’s job market.

Also, take note of the type of content that is included to impress recruiters, and how the most relevant information is made prominent, to ensure it gets noticed.

 

CV builder

 

Occupational Therapy Assistant CV format and structure

Hiring managers and recruiters are frequently overloaded with applications, and if they can’t identify the relevant information in your CV within a few seconds, your application may be overlooked.

To avoid this, it’s essential to format and structure your CV in a manner that makes it simple to pick out the most important information, even if the reader is in a rush.

 

How to write a CV

 

Tips for formatting your Occupational Therapy Assistant CV

  • Length: Two sides of A4 makes for the perfect CV length, though one page is okay for less experienced applicants. This forces you to make sure that every single sentence adds value to your CV and ensures you avoid unnecessary  info.
  • Readability: Columns, lists, bullet points, bold text and subtle colour can all help to aid the readability of your CV. Your overarching goal should be to make the content as easy to read and navigate as possible, whilst also aiming to make your key skills and achievements stand out.
  • Design & format: While it’s okay to add your own spin to your CV, avoid overdoing the design. If you go for something elaborate, you might end up frustrating recruiters who, above anything, value simplicity and clarity.
  • Photos: Profile photos or aren’t a requirement for most industries, so you don’t need to add one in the UK – but if you do, just make sure it looks professional

 

Quick tip: Creating a professional CV style can be difficult and time-consuming when using Microsoft Word or Google Docs. To create a winning CV quickly, try our quick-and-easy CV Builder and use one of our eye-catching professional CV templates.

 

CV formatting tips

 

 

CV structure

To make it easy for busy recruiters and hiring managers to digest your CV, divide the content into several key sections when writing it:

  • Contact details: Always list your contact details at the very top to avoid them being missed.
  • Profile: Start with an introductory paragraph that catches recruiters’ attention and summarises your offerings.
  • Work experience/career history: List your relevant work experience in reverse chronological order, starting with your current position.
  • Education: Provide a concise summary of your education and qualifications.
  • Interests and hobbies: You can include an optional section to showcase any hobbies that demonstrate transferable skills.

Now you understand the basic layout of a CV, here’s what you should include in each section of yours.

 

Contact Details

Contact details

 

Begin by sharing your contact details, so it’s easy for employers to give you a call.
Keep to the basics, such as:

  • Mobile number
  • Email address – It should sound professional, with no slang or nicknames. Make a new one for your job applications if necessary.
  • Location – Simply share your vague location, for example ‘Manchester’, rather than a full address.
  • LinkedIn profile or portfolio URL – Remember to update them before you send your application.

 

Occupational Therapy Assistant CV Profile

To immediately capture the attention of recruiters, begin your CV with a powerful profile (or personal statement for junior applicants).

This is a brief introductory paragraph that summarises your skills, experience, and knowledge.

It should position you as the ideal candidate for the job and encourage recruiters to read on.

 

CV profile

 

How to write a good CV profile:

  • Make it short and sharp: Recruiters are busy, so to ensure your profile is actually read, it’s best to keep it short and snappy. 3-5 punchy lines makes for the perfect profile.
  • Tailor it: Before writing your CV, make sure to do some research. Figure out exactly what your desired employers are looking for and make sure that you are making those requirements prominent in your CV profile, and throughout.
  • Don’t add an objective: If you want to discuss your career objectives, save them for your cover letter, rather than wasting valuable CV profile space.
  • Avoid generic phrases: “Determined team player who always gives 110%” might seem like a good way to fill up your CV profile, but generic phrases like this won’t land you an interview. Recruiters hear them time and time again and have no real reason to believe them. Instead, pack your profile with your hard skills and tangible achievements.

 

Example CV profile for Occupational Therapy Assistant

Compassionate Occupational Therapy Assistant with 10+ years of success in administering treatments and procedures that help patients recover, develop, and improve skills needed for daily living and working. Adept at researching and recommending appropriate activities based on clients’/patients’ physical and mental condition. Proven ability to instruct patients on exercise, bathroom transfers, self-care/independent, and ADL programmes. Accustomed to handling medications during the distribution process.

 

What to include in your Occupational Therapy Assistant CV profile?

  • Experience overview: Demonstrate your suitability for your target jobs by giving a high level summary of your previous work work experience, including the industries you have worked in, types of employer, and the type of roles you have previous experience of.
  • Targeted skills: Ensure that your profile highlights your key skills that are most relevant to your Occupational Therapy Assistant, and tailor them to match the specific job you are applying for. To do this, refer to the job description to closely align your skills with their requirements.
  • Important qualifications: If the jobs you are applying to require candidates to have certain qualifications, then you must add them in your profile to ensure they are seen by hiring managers.

 

Quick tip: If you are finding it difficult to write an attention-grabbing CV profile, choose from hundreds of pre-written profiles across all industries, and add one to your CV with one click in our quick-and-easy CV Builder. All profiles are written by recruitment experts and easily tailored to suit your unique skillset.

 

Core skills section

Underneath your profile, write a core skills section to make your most relevant skills jump off the page at readers.

It should be made up of 2-3 columns of bullet points of your relevant skills.

Before you do this, look over the job description and make a list of any specific skills, specialisms or knowledge required.

Then, make sure to use your findings in your list. This will paint you as the perfect match for the role.

 

Core skills section CV

 

Important skills for your Occupational Therapy Assistant CV

Patient Assessment – Conducting thorough evaluations of patients’ health status, abilities, and goals to inform treatment planning.

Therapeutic Technique Application – Applying a range of therapeutic techniques, such as exercise, manual therapy, and adaptive equipment use, to support patient rehabilitation.

Rehabilitation Programme Planning – Developing individualised rehabilitation programmes tailored to the specific needs and abilities of patients.

Occupational Therapy Equipment Usage – Operating and maintaining a variety of occupational therapy equipment, from simple aids to complex mechanical devices.

Anatomy and Physiology Knowledge – Understanding the human body’s structure and function to apply suitable therapeutic interventions.

Treatment Progress Monitoring – Tracking patients’ progress throughout the treatment process and adjusting interventions as necessary.

Clinical Documentation – Precisely documenting patient assessments, treatment plans, and progress notes to maintain accurate medical records.

Safety Compliance – Ensuring all therapy activities and environments adhere to health and safety regulations to prevent injury or strain to patients and staff.

Patient Education – Educating patients and their families on therapeutic strategies, the use of adaptive equipment, and home modifications to enhance daily living activities.

Sensory Integration Techniques – Implementing sensory integration techniques to help patients with sensory processing issues improve their ability to respond to environmental stimuli.

 

Quick tip: Our quick-and-easy CV Builder has thousands of in-demand skills for all industries and professions, that can be added to your CV in seconds – This will save you time and ensure you get noticed by recruiters.

 

CV builder

 

Work experience

Next up is your work experience section, which is normally the longest part of your CV.

Start with your current (or most recent) job and work your way backwards through your experience.

Can’t fit all your roles? Allow more space for your recent career history and shorten down descriptions for your older roles.

 

CV work experience order

 

Structuring each job

Lengthy, unbroken chunks of text is a recruiters worst nightmare, but your work experience section can easily end up looking like that if you are not careful.

To avoid this, use my tried-and-tested 3-step structure, as illustrated below:

 

CV role descriptions

 

Outline

Provide a brief overview of the job as a whole, such as what the overriding purpose of your job was and what type of company you worked for.

 

Key responsibilities

Follow with a snappy list of bullet points, detailing your daily duties and responsibilities.

Tailor it to the role you’re applying for by mentioning how you put the target employer’s desired hard skills and knowledge to use in this role.

 

Key achievements

Round up each role by listing 1-3 key achievements, accomplishments or results.

Wherever possible, quantify them using hard facts and figures, as this really helps to prove your value.

 

Sample job description for Occupational Therapy Assistant CV

Outline

Provide occupational therapy to restore patients to their fullest physical ability, for an organisation that provides leadership of a high-quality mental health and addiction prevention, treatment, and recovery system valued across London.

Key Responsibilities

  • Perform individual/group-based occupational therapy interventions, such as activities of daily living, therapeutic exercises, dynamic functional tasks, and aquatic treatments.
  • Coordinate functions associated with patient care by communicating with hospital staff, psychologists, case managers, social workers, and community providers.
  • Develop treatment goals by participating in key treatment team meetings, while tracking medical equipment needed for therapeutic techniques.
  • Prepare patients for independent community living to include motor skills, anger/stress management, as well as provide community resources for peer support and recovery.

 

Quick tip: Create impressive job descriptions easily in our quick-and-easy CV Builder by adding pre-written job phrases for every industry and career stage.

 

 

Education section

Next up, you should list your education and qualifications.

This can include your formal qualifications (a degree, A-Levels and GCSEs), as well as sector-specific Occupational Therapy Assistant qualifications and/or training.

While school leavers and recent grads should include a lot of detail here to make up for the lack of work experience, experienced candidates may benefit from a shorter education section, as your work experience section will be more important to recruiters.

 

Hobbies and interests

The hobbies and interests CV section isn’t mandatory, so don’t worry if you’re out of room by this point.

However, if you have an interesting hobby, or an interest that could make you seem more suitable for the role, then certainly think about adding.

Be careful what you include though… Only consider hobbies that exhibit skills that are required for roles as a Occupational Therapy Assistant, or transferable workplace skills.

There is never any need to tell employers that you like to watch TV and eat out.

 

CV builder

 

Creating a strong Occupational Therapy Assistant CV requires a blend of punchy content, considered structure and format, and heavy tailoring.

By creating a punchy profile and core skills list, you’ll be able to hook recruiter’s attention and ensure your CV gets read.

Remember that research and relevance is the key to a good CV, so research your target roles before you start writing and pack your CV with relevant skills.

Best of luck with your next application!