Newly Qualified Beauty Therapist CV example

Are you a newly qualified beauty therapist ready to make your mark on the industry?

Then it’s time to give your CV a makeover so you can impress the recruiter with your skills.

But if you’re better at cosmetics than you are at creating engaging applications, don’t stress.

We can help you get started with our detailed guide below, complete with a newly qualified beauty therapist CV example to inspire you.

 

 

 

Newly Qualified Beauty Therapist CV example

Newly Qualified Beauty Therapist CV 1

Newly Qualified Beauty Therapist CV 2

 

This is a good example of a Newly Qualified Beauty Therapist CV which is professionally formatted, and structured in a way that allows recruiters to easily find and understand the candidate’s key selling points.

Take some time to look at this CV and refer to it throughout the writing of your own CV for best results.

 

CV builder

 

Newly Qualified Beauty Therapist CV format and structure

Think your CV is just about the content within it? Think again.

Your CV needs to look professional and be easy for recruiters to read, meaning the structure and format of your CV are just as important as the written content within it.

Facilitate ease of reading by using a simple structure which allows anybody to easily navigate your experience.

 

How to write a CV

 

Tips for formatting your Newly Qualified Beauty Therapist CV

  • Length: Even if you’ve got tons of experience to brag about, recruiters don’t have time to read through overly lengthy CVs. Keep it short, concise and relevant – a CV length of 2 sides of A4 pages or less is perfect for the attention spans in today’s job market.
  • Readability: By clearly formatting your section headings (bold, or a different colour font, do the trick) and breaking up big chunks of text into snappy bullet points, time-strapped recruiters will be able to skim through your CV with ease.
  • Design & format: The saying ‘less is more’ couldn’t be more applicable to CVs. Readability is key, so avoid overly complicated designs and graphics. A subtle colour palette and easy-to-read font is all you need!
  • Photos: Headshot photos aren’t required in a CV by most employers, but some creative and artistic industries like to see them. If you decide to include one, make sure you look smart and professional in the picture.

 

Quick tip: Creating a professional CV style can be difficult and time-consuming when using Microsoft Word or Google Docs. To create a winning CV quickly, try our quick-and-easy CV Builder and use one of their eye-catching professional CV templates.

 

CV formatting tips

 

 

CV structure

As you write your CV, divide and sub-head into the following sections:

  • Name and contact details – Always start with these, so employers know exactly how to get in touch with you.
  • CV profile – Add a short summary of your relevant experience, skills and achievements, which highlights your suitability.
  • Core skills section – A 2-3 columned list of your key skills.
  • Work experience – A detailed list of any relevant work experience, whether paid or voluntary.
  • Education – An overview of your academic background and any training you may have completed.
  • Hobbies and interests – A brief overview of your hobbies and interests, if they’re relevant (optional).

Now you understand the basic layout of a CV, here’s what you should include in each section of yours.

 

Contact Details

Contact details

 

Start off your CV with a basic list of your contact details.
Here’s what you should include:

  • Mobile number
  • Email address – It’s often helpful to make a new email address, specifically for your job applications.
  • Location – Share your town or city; there’s no need for a full address.
  • LinkedIn profile or portfolio URL – Make sure the information on them is coherent with your CV, and that they’re up-to-date

Quick tip: Delete excessive details, such as your date of birth or marital status. Recruiters don’t need to know this much about you, so it’s best to save the space for your other CV sections.

 

Newly Qualified Beauty Therapist CV Profile

Recruiters read through countless applications every day.

If they don’t find what they’re looking for quickly, they’ll simply move onto the next one.

That’s what makes your CV profile (or personal statement, if you’re an entry-level/graduate candidate) so important.

This short and snappy summary sits at the top of your CV, and should give a high-level overview of why you’re a good match for the job.

This way, you can ensure that busy recruiters see your suitability from the outset, and so, feel your CV is worth their time.

 

CV profile

 

How to write a good CV profile:

  • Make it short and sharp: It might be tempting to submit a page-long CV profile, but recruiters won’t have the time to read it. To ensure every word gets read, it’s best to include high-level information only; sticking to a length of 3-5 lines.
  • Tailor it: If recruiters don’t see your suitability within a few seconds, they may close your CV straight away. Your CV profile should closely match the essential requirements listed in the job ad, so make sure to review them before you write it.
  • Don’t add an objective: If you want to discuss your career objectives, save them for your cover letter, rather than wasting valuable CV profile space.
  • Avoid generic phrases: If there’s one thing that’ll annoy a recruiter, it’s a clichè-packed CV. Focus on showcasing your hard skills, experience and the results you’ve gained in previous roles, which will impress recruiters far more.

 

Example CV profile for Newly Qualified Beauty Therapist

Motivated Newly Qualified Beauty Therapist with 2+ years of success in performing various services to enhance customers’ appearance, improve their overall well-being, and promote relaxation. Adept at marketing and selling additional offerings to stimulate salon and spa revenues. Focused on conforming to health and safety regulations and local licensing requirements in all practices. 

 

What to include in your Newly Qualified Beauty Therapist CV profile?

  • Experience overview: To give employers an idea of your capabilities, show them your track record by giving an overview of the types of companies you have worked for in the past and the roles you have carried out for previous employers – but keep it high level and save the details for your experience section.
  • Targeted skills: Highlight your skills which are most relevant to Newly Qualified Beauty Therapist jobs, to ensure that recruiters see your most in-demand skills as soon as they open your CV.
  • Important qualifications: If you have any qualifications which are highly relevant to Newly Qualified Beauty Therapist jobs, then highlight them in your profile so that employers do not miss them.

 

Quick tip: If you are finding it difficult to write an attention-grabbing CV profile, choose from hundreds of pre-written profiles across all industries, and add one to your CV with one click in our quick-and-easy CV Builder. All profiles are written by recruitment experts and easily tailored to suit your unique skillset.

 

Core skills section

Underneath your profile, write a core skills section to make your most relevant skills jump off the page at readers.

It should be made up of 2-3 columns of bullet points of your relevant skills.

Before you do this, look over the job description and make a list of any specific skills, specialisms or knowledge required.

Then, make sure to use your findings in your list. This will paint you as the perfect match for the role.

 

Core skills section CV

 

Important skills for your Newly Qualified Beauty Therapist CV

Skin Analysis – Conducting skin assessments to identify skin types, conditions, and concerns, enabling personalised skincare recommendations.

Facial Treatments – Performing various facial treatments, including cleansing, exfoliating, extracting, and applying masks tailored to individual client needs.

Waxing and Hair Removal – Maintaining expertise in waxing techniques for different body areas, ensuring safe and effective hair removal.

Manicures and Pedicures – Providing professional manicures and pedicures, including nail shaping, cuticle care, and nail polish application.

Massage Therapy – Utilising knowledge of different massage techniques, such as Swedish and deep tissue massage, to offer relaxation and muscle relief.

Makeup Application – Applying makeup for various occasions, ranging from natural and daytime looks to special events and bridal makeup.

Eyelash and Eyebrow Treatments – Maintaining proficiency in lash and brow tinting, shaping, and extensions to enhance clients’ eye appearance.

Product Knowledge – Maintaining familiarity with skincare and cosmetic products, including ingredients and usage, to make informed product recommendations.

Hygiene and Sanitation – Adhering to strict hygiene and sanitation standards to ensure client safety and prevent infections.

Client Communication – Consulting with clients, understanding their preferences and concerns, and providing excellent customer service.

 

Quick tip: Our quick-and-easy CV Builder has thousands of in-demand skills for all industries and professions, that can be added to your CV in seconds – This will save you time and ensure you get noticed by recruiters.

 

CV builder

 

Work experience

By now, you’ll have hooked the reader’s attention and need to show them how you apply your skills and knowledge in the workplace, to benefit your employers.

So, starting with your most recent role and working backwards to your older roles, create a thorough summary of your career history to date.

If you’ve held several roles and are struggling for space, cut down the descriptions for your oldest jobs.

 
Work experience
 

Structuring each job

Whilst writing your CV, it’s essential to look at it from the eyes of a recruiter.

If they’re met with giant blocks of text which are impossible to navigate, they might get frustrated and skip onto the next CV.

Instead, make use of the 3-step structure shown below, to give them a pleasant reading experience.

 
Role descriptions
 

Outline

Firstly, give the reader some context by creating a punchy summary of the job as a whole.

You should mention what the purpose or goal of your role was, what team you were part of and who you reported to.

 

Key responsibilities

Next, write up a punchy list of your daily duties and responsibilities, using bullet points.

Wherever you can, point out how you put your hard skills and knowledge to use – especially skills which are applicable to your target role.

 

Key achievements

Round up each role by listing 1-3 key achievements, accomplishments or results.

Wherever possible, quantify them using hard facts and figures, as this really helps to prove your value.

 

Sample job description for Newly Qualified Beauty Therapist CV

Outline

Provide a range of beauty and skincare treatments to diverse clientele, for a company that changes the way people transform their skin through safe, effective, and affordable beautification approaches.

Key Responsibilities

  • Schedule and manage weekly appointments with absolute professionalism.
  • Conduct thorough consultations to understand specific cosmetic, aesthetics, grooming, and pampering needs, desires, and any contraindications.
  • Execute appearance enhancements in compliance with industry standards and quality expectations.
  • Wash and exfoliate, apply appropriate masks, and moisturise the body and face based on skin type and condition.

 

Quick tip: Create impressive job descriptions easily in our quick-and-easy CV Builder by adding pre-written job phrases for every industry and career stage.

 

 

Education section

Next up, you should list your education and qualifications.

This can include your formal qualifications (a degree, A-Levels and GCSEs), as well as sector-specific Newly Qualified Beauty Therapist qualifications and/or training.

While school leavers and recent grads should include a lot of detail here to make up for the lack of work experience, experienced candidates may benefit from a shorter education section, as your work experience section will be more important to recruiters.

 

Hobbies and interests

This section is entirely optional, so you’ll have to use your own judgement to figure out if it’s worth including.

If your hobbies and interests could make you appear more suitable for your dream job, then they are definitely worth adding.

Interests which are related to the industry, or hobbies like sports teams or volunteering, which display valuable transferable skills might be worth including.

 

CV builder

 

A strong, compelling CV is essential to get noticed and land interviews with the best employers.

To ensure your CV stands out from the competition, make sure to tailor it to your target role and pack it with sector-specific skills and results.

Remember to triple-check for spelling and grammar errors before hitting send.

Good luck with the job search!