Credit Control Manager CV example

Are you hoping to secure your next position as a credit control manager?

Then you need to prove you have the perfect balance of accounting, leadership and timekeeping skills.

You need a strong CV that will help you to stand out from the crowd and get noticed by employers, and we can help with that.

Check out our expert advice and credit control manager CV example in the guide below.

 

 

 

Credit Control Manager CV example

Credit Control Manager CV 1

Credit Control Manager CV 2

 

This CV example illustrates the ideal structure and format for your Credit Control Manager CV, making it easy for busy hiring managers to quickly identify your suitability for the jobs you’re applying for,

It also gives some guidance on the skills, experience and qualifications you should emphasise in your own CV.

 

CV builder

 

Credit Control Manager CV format and structure

Your CV is the first impression you’ll make on anybody who reads it.

A disorganised, cluttered and barely-readable CV could seriously decrease your chances of landing interviews, so it’s essential to make sure yours is slick, professional and easy to navigate.

You can do this by using a clear structure and formatting your content with some savvy formatting techniques – check them out below:

 

How to write a CV

 

Tips for formatting your Credit Control Manager CV

  • Length: Two sides of A4 makes for the perfect CV length, though one page is okay for less experienced applicants. This forces you to make sure that every single sentence adds value to your CV and ensures you avoid unnecessary  info.
  • Readability: To help recruiters quickly skim through your CV, it’s important to format your section headings with bold or a different colour font and break up lengthy paragraphs into short sharp bullet points. This enables them to easily identify important information and assess your suitability.
  • Design & format: The saying ‘less is more’ couldn’t be more applicable to CVs. Readability is key, so avoid overly complicated designs and graphics. A subtle colour palette and easy-to-read font is all you need!
  • Photos: You can add a profile photo to your CV, if you want to add some personality to it, but they are not a requirement the UK, so you don’t have to.

 

Quick tip: Creating a professional CV style can be difficult and time-consuming when using Microsoft Word or Google Docs. To create a winning CV quickly, try our quick-and-easy CV Builder and use one of their eye-catching professional CV templates.

 

CV formatting tips

 

 

CV structure

When writing your CV, break up the content into the following key sections, to ensure it can be easily digested by busy recruiters and hiring managers:

  • Contact details – Always list these at the very top of your CV – you don’t want them to be missed!
  • Profile – An introductory paragraph, intended to grab recruiters attention and summarise your offering.
  • Work experience / career history – Working from your current role and working backwards, list your relevant work experience.
  • Education – Create a snappy summary of your education and qualifications.
  • Interest and hobbies – An optional section to document any hobbies that demonstrate transferable skills.

Now you understand the basic layout of a CV, here’s what you should include in each section of yours.

 

Contact Details

Contact details

 

Kick-start your CV with your contact details, so recruiters can get in touch easily.
Here’s what you should include:

  • Mobile number
  • Email address – Make sure it’s professional, with no silly nicknames.
  • Location – Your town or city is sufficient, rather than a full address.
  • LinkedIn profile or portfolio URL – Ensure they’ve been updated and are looking slick and professional.

Quick tip: Avoid listing your date of birth, marital status or other irrelevant details – they’re unnecessary at this stage.

 

Credit Control Manager CV Profile

Your CV profile is basically a short introductory paragraph, which summarises your key selling points and highlights why you’d make a good hire.

So, write a well-rounded summary of what you do, what your key skills are, and what relevant experience you have.

It needs to be short, snappy and punchy and, ultimately, entice the reader to read the rest of your CV.

 

CV profile

 

How to write a good CV profile:

  • Make it short and sharp: It might be tempting to submit a page-long CV profile, but recruiters won’t have the time to read it. To ensure every word gets read, it’s best to include high-level information only; sticking to a length of 3-5 lines.
  • Tailor it: If recruiters don’t see your suitability within a few seconds, they may close your CV straight away. Your CV profile should closely match the essential requirements listed in the job ad, so make sure to review them before you write it.
  • Don’t add an objective: You only have a small space for your CV profile, so avoid writing down your career goals or objectives. If you think these will help your application, incorporate them into your cover letter instead.
  • Avoid generic phrases: “Determined team player who always gives 110%” might seem like a good way to fill up your CV profile, but generic phrases like this won’t land you an interview. Recruiters hear them time and time again and have no real reason to believe them. Instead, pack your profile with your hard skills and tangible achievements.

 

Example CV profile for Credit Control Manager

Strategic Credit Control Manager with over 10 years of experience overseeing credit control functions for companies within the UK financial sector. Proficient in managing debt recovery processes across a diverse range of portfolios supported by a Level 5 CICM certification. Adept at utilising proactive strategies to mitigate credit risk, optimise cash flow, and ensure compliance with evolving regulatory standards.

 

What to include in your Credit Control Manager CV profile?

  • Experience overview: Showcase your aptitude for the job you are aiming for by giving a brief summary of your past work history, including the industries you have worked in, the kinds of employers you have served, and the roles you have held.
  • Targeted skills: Employers need to know what skills you can bring to their organisation, and ideally they want to see skills that match their job vacancy. So, research your target roles thoroughly and add the most important Credit Control Manager skills to your profile.
  • Important qualifications: If the jobs you are applying to require candidates to have certain qualifications, then you must add them in your profile to ensure they are seen by hiring managers.

 

Quick tip: If you are finding it difficult to write an attention-grabbing CV profile, choose from hundreds of pre-written profiles across all industries, and add one to your CV with one click in our quick-and-easy CV Builder. All profiles are written by recruitment experts and easily tailored to suit your unique skillset.

 

Core skills section

Add a core skills section below your profile to draw attention to your most applicable skills and make them stand out to readers.

This should consist of 2-3 columns of bullet points that emphasise your relevant skills.

Before creating this section, review the job description and compile a list of any specific skills, specializations, or knowledge needed. Incorporate these findings into your list to portray yourself as the ideal candidate for the position.

 

Core skills section CV

 

Important skills for your Credit Control Manager CV

Credit Risk Assessment – Evaluating creditworthiness of clients using financial analysis, credit scoring models, and risk assessment tools.

Debt Collection – Implementing effective debt collection strategies and techniques to recover overdue payments while maintaining customer relationships.

Negotiation – Negotiating payment plans and settlements with clients who have outstanding debts.

Legal Compliance – Ensuring all credit control activities comply with UK legal standards, including knowledge of the Consumer Credit Act and other relevant regulations.

Financial Reporting – Preparing financial reports related to credit, such as aging reports, to inform management decisions.

Credit Policy Development – Developing and implementing credit policies and procedures to minimise risk and optimise financial performance.

Accounts Receivable Management – Managing the accounts receivable ledger and ensuring accurate recording of payments and outstanding balances.

Cash Flow Management – Monitoring and managing cash flow related to credit, ensuring sufficient liquidity for business operations.

Customer Service – Maintaining professional customer service, particularly in handling disputes or negotiations with clients.

Data Analysis – Analysing credit and financial data to identify trends, risks, and opportunities for improvement in credit operations.

 

Quick tip: Our quick-and-easy CV Builder has thousands of in-demand skills for all industries and professions, that can be added to your CV in seconds – This will save you time and ensure you get noticed by recruiters.

 

CV builder

 

Work experience

By this point, employers will be keen to know more detail about you career history.

Starting with your most recent role and working backwards, create a snappy list of any relevant roles you’ve held.

This could be freelance, voluntary, part-time or temporary jobs too. Anything that’s relevant to your target role is well-worth listing!

 

CV work experience

 

Structuring each job

Whilst writing your CV, it’s essential to look at it from the eyes of a recruiter.

If they’re met with giant blocks of text which are impossible to navigate, they might get frustrated and skip onto the next CV.

Instead, make use of the 3-step structure shown below, to give them a pleasant reading experience.

 

Role descriptions

 

Outline

Start with a brief summary of your role as a whole, as well as the type of company you worked for.

 

Key responsibilities

Next, write up a punchy list of your daily duties and responsibilities, using bullet points.

Wherever you can, point out how you put your hard skills and knowledge to use – especially skills which are applicable to your target role.

 

Key achievements

Round up each role by listing 1-3 key achievements, accomplishments or results.

Wherever possible, quantify them using hard facts and figures, as this really helps to prove your value.

 

Sample job description for Credit Control Manager CV

Outline

Lead credit control initiatives for a prominent UK credit union, specialising in minimising bad debt and optimising cash flow through strategic credit risk assessment.

Key Responsibilities

  • Develop and implement credit control policies in accordance with FCA guidelines, ensuring compliance with UK financial regulations
  • Analyse and assess credit risk, determining credit limits and payment terms to mitigate potential bad debt
  • Oversee accounts receivable, actively monitoring and reducing outstanding debts within specified credit terms
  • Collaborate with legal teams for debt recovery actions, managing court proceedings and insolvency proceedings if necessary

 

Quick tip: Create impressive job descriptions easily in our quick-and-easy CV Builder by adding pre-written job phrases for every industry and career stage.

 

 

Education section

In your education section, make any degrees, qualifications or training which are relevant to Credit Control Manager roles a focal point.

As well as mentioning the name of the organisation, qualification titles and dates of study, you should showcase any particularly relevant modules, assignments or projects.

 

Hobbies and interests

Although this is an optional section, it can be useful if your hobbies and interests will add further depth to your CV.

Interests which are related to the sector you are applying to, or which show transferable skills like leadership or teamwork, can worth listing.

On the other hand, generic hobbies like “going out with friends” won’t add any value to your application, so are best left off your CV.

 

CV builder

 

An interview-winning CV for a Credit Control Manager role, needs to be both visually pleasing and packed with targeted content.

Whilst it needs to detail your experience, accomplishments and relevant skills, it also needs to be as clear and easy to read as possible.

Remember to research the role and review the job ad before applying, so you’re able to match yourself up to the requirements.

If you follow these guidelines and keep motivated in your job search, you should land an interview in no time.

Best of luck with your next application!