Business Intelligence Analyst CV example

You’ve got a head for numbers and a heart for data, that’s why you’re a skilled business intelligence analyst.

The tricky part is making sure you apply these skills to your CV to effectively showcase your achievements and secure an interview.

So, to help you do this, we’ve put together a step-by-step guide, complete with a business intelligence analyst CV example. Check them out below.

 

 

 

Business Intelligence Analyst CV example

Business Intelligence Analyst CV 1

Business Intelligence Analyst CV 2

 

Use this CV example as a guide to formatting and structuring your Business Intelligence Analyst CV, so that busy recruiters can easily digest your information and determine your suitability for the role.

It also provides some insight into the key skills, experience and qualifications you need to highlight.

 

CV builder

 

Business Intelligence Analyst CV format and structure

Hiring managers and recruiters are frequently overloaded with applications, and if they can’t identify the relevant information in your CV within a few seconds, your application may be overlooked.

To avoid this, it’s essential to format and structure your CV in a manner that makes it simple to pick out the most important information, even if the reader is in a rush.

 

How to write a CV

 

Tips for formatting your Business Intelligence Analyst CV

  • Length: Two sides of A4 makes for the perfect CV length, though one page is okay for less experienced applicants. This forces you to make sure that every single sentence adds value to your CV and ensures you avoid unnecessary  info.
  • Readability: To help recruiters quickly skim through your CV, it’s important to format your section headings with bold or a different colour font and break up lengthy paragraphs into short sharp bullet points. This enables them to easily identify important information and assess your suitability.
  • Design & format: When it comes to CV design, it’s best to keep things simple and sleek. While elaborate designs certainly command attention, it’s not always for the right reasons! Readability is key, so whatever you choose to do, make sure you prioritise readability above everything.
  • Photos: Profile photos or aren’t a requirement for most industries, so you don’t need to add one in the UK – but if you do, just make sure it looks professional

 

Quick tip: Creating a professional CV style can be difficult and time-consuming when using Microsoft Word or Google Docs. To create a winning CV quickly, try our quick-and-easy CV Builder and use one of their eye-catching professional CV templates.

 

CV formatting tips

 

 

CV structure

As you write your CV, work to the simple but effective structure below:

  • Name and contact details – Pop them at the top of your CV, so it’s easy for recruiters to contact you.
  • CV profile – Write a snappy overview of what makes you a good fit for the role; discussing your key experience, skills and accomplishments.
  • Core skills section – Add a short but snappy list of your relevant skills and knowledge.
  • Work experience – A list of your relevant work experience, starting with your current role.
  • Education – A summary of your relevant qualifications and professional/vocational training.
  • Hobbies and interests – An optional sections, which you could use to write a short description of any relevant hobbies or interests.

Now you understand the basic layout of a CV, here’s what you should include in each section of yours.

 

Contact Details

Contact details

 

Tuck your contact details into the corner of your CV, so that they don’t take up too much space.
Stick to the basic details, such as:

  • Mobile number
  • Email address – It should sound professional, such as your full name.
  • Location -Just write your rough location, rather than your full address.
  • LinkedIn profile or portfolio URL – If you include these, ensure they’re sleek, professional and up-to-date.

 

Business Intelligence Analyst CV Profile

Recruiters and hiring managers are busy, so it’s essential to catch their attention from the get-go.

A strong introductory profile (or personal statement, for junior candidates) at the top of the CV is the first thing they’ll read, so it’s a great chance to make an impression.

It should be a short but punchy summary of your key skills, relevant experience and accomplishments.

Ultimately, it should explain why you’re a great fit for the role you’re applying for and inspire recruiters to read the rest of your CV.

 

CV profile

 

How to write a good CV profile:

  • Make it short and sharp: Aim for a short, snappy paragraph of 3-5 lines. This is just enough room to showcase why you’d make the perfect hire, without going into excessive detail and overwhelming busy recruiters.
  • Tailor it: Not tailoring your profile (and the rest of your CV) to the role you’re applying for, is the worst CV mistake you could make. Before setting pen to paper, look over the job ad and make a note of the skills and experience required. Then, incorporate your findings throughout.
  • Don’t add an objective: You only have a small space for your CV profile, so avoid writing down your career goals or objectives. If you think these will help your application, incorporate them into your cover letter instead.
  • Avoid generic phrases: If your CV is riddled with clichès like “Dynamic thought-leader”, hit that delete button. Phrases like these are like a broken record to recruiters, who read them countless times per day. Hard facts, skills, knowledge and results are sure to yield far better results.

 

Example CV profile for Business Intelligence Analyst

Motivated Business Intelligence Analyst with over 10 years of experience in the field, possessing expertise in data analysis, reporting, and dashboards. Highly skilled in ETL tools, SQL, Python, Tableau, and Google Analytics. Adept at developing actionable insights from data, collaborating with stakeholders, and presenting results to senior management. Proven track record in executing end-to-end data projects with a strong business acumen and project management experience.

 

What to include in your Business Intelligence Analyst CV profile?

  • Experience overview: Showcase your aptitude for the job you are aiming for by giving a brief summary of your past work history, including the industries you have worked in, the kinds of employers you have served, and the roles you have held.
  • Targeted skills: Make your most relevant Business Intelligence Analyst key skills clear in your profile. These should be tailored to the specific role you’re applying for – so make sure to check the job description first, and aim to match their requirements as closely as you can.
  • Important qualifications: If the jobs you are applying to require candidates to have certain qualifications, then you must add them in your profile to ensure they are seen by hiring managers.

 

Quick tip: If you are finding it difficult to write an attention-grabbing CV profile, choose from hundreds of pre-written profiles across all industries, and add one to your CV with one click in our quick-and-easy CV Builder. All profiles are written by recruitment experts and easily tailored to suit your unique skillset.

 

Core skills section

To ensure that your most relevant skills catch the eye of readers, create a core skills section below your profile.

This section should be presented in 2-3 columns of bullet points highlighting your applicable skills. Before crafting this section, carefully examine the job description and create a list of any required skills, specialisms, or knowledge.

Use this list to include the necessary information in your section and present yourself as the ideal match for the position.

 

Core skills section CV

 

Important skills for your Business Intelligence Analyst CV

Data Analysis – Analysing complex data sets, identifying patterns, and extracting insights to support decision-making and business strategies.

SQL Programming – Utilising Structured Query Language (SQL) to retrieve, manipulate, and analyse data from relational databases.

Data Visualisation – Creating visually appealing and informative dashboards, reports, and data visualisations using tools like Tableau, Power BI, or QlikView.

Data Warehousing – Utilising knowledge of data warehousing concepts and experience in designing and managing data warehouses for efficient data storage and retrieval.

Business Intelligence Tools – Utilising business intelligence tools and platforms, such as Microsoft BI, Oracle BI, or SAP BusinessObjects, to extract, transform, and load data.

Statistical Analysis – Applying statistical techniques and methods to analyse data, perform hypothesis testing, and build predictive models.

Data Mining – Utilising data mining techniques to discover meaningful patterns and relationships in large datasets, including classification, clustering, and association analysis.

Data Governance – Utilising knowledge of data governance principles and practices, including data quality management, data privacy, and compliance with regulatory requirements.

Reporting and Dashboarding – Creating automated reports and interactive dashboards to monitor key performance indicators (KPIs) and track business metrics.

Business Acumen – Utilising knowledge of business operations, key performance indicators, and industry trends to provide valuable insights and recommendations to stakeholders.

 

Quick tip: Our quick-and-easy CV Builder has thousands of in-demand skills for all industries and professions, that can be added to your CV in seconds – This will save you time and ensure you get noticed by recruiters.

 

CV builder

 

Work experience

Recruiters will be itching to know more about your relevant experience by now.

Kick-start this section with your most recent (or current) position, and work your way backwards through your history.

You can include voluntary and freelance work, too – as long as you’re honest about the nature of the work.

 
Work experience
 

Structuring each job

If you don’t pay attention to the structure of your career history section, it could quickly become bulky and overwhelming.

Get in recruiters’ good books by creating a pleasant reading experience, using the 3-step structure below:

 
Role descriptions
 

Outline

Start with a 1-2 sentence summary of your role as a whole, detailing what the goal of your position was, who you reported to or managed, and the type of organisation you worked for.

 

Key responsibilities

Using easy-to-read bullet points, note down your day-to-day responsibilities in the role.

Make sure to showcase how you used your hard sector skills and knowledge.

 

Key achievements

To finish off each role and prove the impact you made, list 1-3 stand out achievements, results or accomplishments.

This could be anything which had a positive outcome for the company you worked for, or perhaps a client/customer.
Where applicable, quantify your examples with facts and figures.

 

Sample job description for Business Intelligence Analyst CV

Outline

Work as a Business Intelligence Analyst for a leading online clothing retailer, completing complex analysis on big data to support the optimisation and development of an e-commerce website that is currently live in 15 countries.

Key Responsibilities

  • Utilise ETL tools, SQL, and Python to extract, transform and load large datasets
  • Design and develop systems for analysing data, collecting metrics and reporting
  • Mine analytical and customer requirements insight data
  • Design and develop reports and dashboards using Tableau and Google Analytics to provide insights on various KPIs for the e-commerce department

 

Quick tip: Create impressive job descriptions easily in our quick-and-easy CV Builder by adding pre-written job phrases for every industry and career stage.

 

 

Education section

After your work experience, your education section should provide a detailed view of your academic background.

Begin with those most relevant to Business Intelligence Analyst jobs, such as vocational training or degrees. If you have space, you can also mention your academic qualifications, such as A-Levels and GCSEs.

Focus on the qualifications that are most relevant to the jobs you are applying for.

 

Hobbies and interests

Although this is an optional section, it can be useful if your hobbies and interests will add further depth to your CV.

Interests which are related to the sector you are applying to, or which show transferable skills like leadership or teamwork, can worth listing.

On the other hand, generic hobbies like “going out with friends” won’t add any value to your application, so are best left off your CV.

 

CV builder

 

A strong, compelling CV is essential to get noticed and land interviews with the best employers.

To ensure your CV stands out from the competition, make sure to tailor it to your target role and pack it with sector-specific skills and results.

Remember to triple-check for spelling and grammar errors before hitting send.

Good luck with the job search!