Factory worker CV example

Factory worker CV example

Many people seek out factory worker positions and so employers often have a lot of choice in applicants.

Your factory worker CV needs to make sure you get noticed and invited to interview.

In this guide we give you an example factory worker CV – and we also take you through everything you need to include so that you get the job you want.

 

Guide contents

  • Factory worker CV example
  • Structuring and formatting your CV
  • Writing your CV profile
  • Detailing work experience
  • Your education
  • Skills required for your Factory worker CV

 

Factory worker CV example

Factory worker CV 1

 

Factory worker CV 2

 

This a good example of a Factory worker CV which contains all of the information that an employer would need to know, and presents it in a well- structured, easy-to-read manner.

Take some time to look at this CV and refer to it throughout the writing of your own CV for best results.

 

 

Factory worker CV structure & format

If you focus on the written content of your CV but ignore how it actually looks, your efforts could end up wasted.

No matter how suitable you are for the role, no recruiter wants to spend time squinting and trying to navigate a badly designed and disorganised CV.

Instead, make sure to organise your content into a simple structure and spend some time formatting it for ease of reading - it'll get you in recruiter's good books from the get-go!

 

CV structure

 

Formatting Tips

  • Length: Think that submitting a five page CV will impress recruiters? You're wrong! Even if you've got tons of experience to brag about, recruiters don't have time to read through overly detailed CVs. Keep it short, concise and relevant - a CV length of 2 sides of A4 pages or less is perfect.
  • Readability: By clearly formatting your section headings (bold, or a different colour font, do the trick) and breaking up big chunks of text into snappy bullet points, time-strapped recruiters will be able to skim through your CV with ease.
  • Design: The saying 'less is more' couldn't be more applicable to CVs. Readability is key, so avoid overly complicated designs and graphics. A subtle colour palette and easy-to-read font is all you need!
  • Avoid photos: Ditch logos, images or profile photos. Not only do they take up valuable space, but they may even distract recruiters from your important written content.

 

Structuring your CV

When writing your CV, break up the content into the following key sections, to ensure it can be easily digested by busy recruiters and hiring managers:
  • Contact details – Always list these at the very top of your CV - you don’t want them to be missed!
  • Profile – An introductory paragraph, intended to grab recruiters attention and summarise your offering.
  • Work experience / career history – Working from your current role and working backwards, list your relevant work experience.
  • Education – Create a snappy summary of your education and qualifications.
  • Interest and hobbies – An optional section to document any hobbies that demonstrate transferable skills.

 

Now I'll guide you through exactly what you should include in each CV section.

 

 

CV Contact Details

CV contact details

 

Write your contact details in the top corner of your CV, so that they're easy to find but don't take up too much space.

You only need to list your basic details, such as:

  • Mobile number
  • Email address
  • Location - Don't list your full address. Your town or city, such as 'Norwich' or 'Coventry' is perfect.
  • LinkedIn profile or portfolio URL - Remember to update these before listing them on an application.

 

 

Factory worker CV Profile

Recruiters read through countless applications every day.

If they don't find what they're looking for quickly, they'll simply move onto the next one.

That's what makes your CV profile (or personal statement, if you're an entry-level/graduate candidate) so important.

This short and snappy summary sits at the top of your CV, and should give a high-level overview of why you're a good match for the job.

This way, you can ensure that busy recruiters see your suitability from the outset, and so, feel your CV is worth their time.

 

CV profile

 

Tips for creating an impactful CV profile:

  • Keep it brief: Recruiters have piles of CVs to read through and limited time to dedicate to each, so it pays to showcase your abilities in as few words as possible. 3-4 lines is ideal.
  • Tailor it: Not tailoring your profile (and the rest of your CV) to the role you're applying for, is the worst CV mistake you could make. Before setting pen to paper, look over the job ad and make a note of the skills and experience required. Then, incorporate your findings throughout.
  • Don't add an objective: Leave your career objectives or goals out of your profile. You only have limited space to work with, so they're best suited to your cover letter.
  • Avoid cliches: If there's one thing that'll annoy a recruiter, it's a clichè-packed CV. Focus on showcasing your hard skills, experience and the results you've gained in previous roles, which will impress recruiters far more.

 

What to include in your Factory worker CV profile?

  • Summary of experience: Start with a brief summary of your relevant experience so far. How many years experience do you have? What type of companies have you worked for? What industries/sectors have you worked in? What are your specialisms?
  • Relevant skills: Make your most relevant Factory worker key skills clear in your profile. These should be tailored to the specific role you're applying for — so make sure to check the job description first, and aim to match their requirements as closely as you can.
  • Essential qualifications: If you have any qualifications which are highly relevant to Factory worker jobs, then highlight them in your profile so that employers do not miss them.

 

Quick tip: If spelling and grammar are not a strong point of yours, make use of a writing assistant tool like Grammarly. It'll help you avoid overlooking spelling mistakes and grammar errors and, best of all, is completely free!

 

Core skills section

In addition to your CV profile, your core skills section provides an easily digestible snapshot of your skills - perfect for grabbing the attention of busy hiring managers.

As Factory worker jobs might receive a huge pile of applications, this is a great way to stand out and show off your suitability for the role.

It should be made up of 2-3 columns of bullet points and be made up of skills that are highly relevant to the jobs you are targeting.

 

Core skills 

 


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Work experience/Career history

By this point, employers will be keen to know more detail about you career history.

Starting with your most recent role and working backwards, create a snappy list of any relevant roles you've held.

This could be freelance, voluntary, part-time or temporary jobs too. Anything that's relevant to your target role is well-worth listing!

 

CV work experience

  

Structuring your roles

Whilst writing your CV, it's essential to look at it from the eyes of a recruiter.

If they're met with giant blocks of text which are impossible to navigate, they might get frustrated and skip onto the next CV.

Instead, make use of the 3-step structure shown below, to give them a pleasant reading experience.

  

Role descriptions

 

Outline

Start with a solid introduction to your role as a whole, in order to build some context.

Explain the nature of the organisation you worked for, the size of the team you were part of, who you reported to and what the overarching purpose of your job was.

E.g.

“Accountable for producing and dispatching various pieces of medical equipment for the largest medical equipment supplier in the South of the UK.”

 

Key responsibilities

Using easy-to-read bullet points, note down your day-to-day responsibilities in the role.

Make sure to showcase how you used your hard sector skills and knowledge.

E.g.

  • Assemble various pieces of medical equipment from scratch using raw materials and various factory floor machines
  • Check each machine before use and notify senior staff of any potential issues
  • Manage several customer orders per shift, ensuring orders are ready to be dispatched in a timely manner

 

Key achievements

Finish off by showcasing 1-3 key achievements made within the role.

This could be anything that had a positive effect on your company, clients or customers, such as saving time or money, receiving exemplary feedback or receiving an award.

E.g.

  • Designed and amended the production procedure for a commonly ordered item, giving a time saving of 52 minutes per production run and a substantial manual labour cost saving

 

Education

Next up, you should list your education and qualifications.

This can include your formal qualifications (a degree, A-Levels and GCSEs), as well as sector-specific Factory worker qualifications and/or training.

While school leavers and recent grads should include a lot of detail here to make up for the lack of work experience, experienced candidates may benefit from a shorter education section, as your work experience section will be more important to recruiters.

 

 

Interests and hobbies

The hobbies and interests CV section isn't mandatory, so don't worry if you're out of room by this point.

However, if you have an interesting hobby, or an interest that could make you seem more suitable for the role, then certainly think about adding.

Be careful what you include though... Only consider hobbies that exhibit skills that are required for roles as a Factory worker, or transferable workplace skills.

There is never any need to tell employers that you like to watch TV and eat out.

 

 


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Essential skills for your Factory worker CV

Tailoring your CV to the roles you are applying for is key to success, so make sure to read through the job descriptions and tailor your skills accordingly.

However, commonly desired Factory worker skills include:

DexteritySo that you achieve accuracy and efficiency, you need to demonstrate on your CV that you have excellent fine motor skills and dexterity.

Quality control Your factory worker CV should show that you are attentive when it comes to accuracy and detail.

Listening skills Your CV should include how your listening skills and ability to follow instructions are top notch.

Concentration The ability to sustain concentration and be methodical through repeated processes is essential.

Stamina Your physical skills should also include stamina, showing that you can stand and perform well for long periods of time.

 

 

Writing your Factory worker CV

An interview-winning CV for a Factory worker role, needs to be both visually pleasing and packed with targeted content.

Whilst it needs to detail your experience, accomplishments and relevant skills, it also needs to be as clear and easy to read as possible.

Remember to research the role and review the job ad before applying, so you're able to match yourself up to the requirements.

If you follow these guidelines and keep motivated in your job search, you should land an interview in no time.

Best of luck with your next application!