Reporting Analyst CV example

You’re an expert at handling data and analysing metrics, but do you know how important metrics can be when writing a job application?

If you’re looking for your next analyst role, you need to learn how to highlight your most impressive skills and achievements on your CV, and we can help.

Check out our top tips in the guide below, complete with a reporting analyst CV example to shape your own.

 

 

 

Reporting Analyst CV example

Reporting Analyst CV 1

Reporting Analyst CV 2

 

Unsure of what your Reporting Analyst CV should look like?

Have a look at the CV example above to get familiar with the structure, layout and format of a professional CV.

As you can see, it provides plenty of relevant information about the applicant but is still very easy to read, and brief – which will please busy recruiters and hiring managers.

 

CV builder

 

Reporting Analyst CV format and structure

Recruiters and employers are busy, and if they can’t find the information they’re looking for in a few seconds, it could be game over for your application.

You need to format and structure your CV in a way which allows the reader to pick out your key information with ease, even if they’re strapped for time.

It should be clear, easily legible, well-organised and scannable – check out some simple tips and tricks below:

 

How to write a CV

 

Tips for formatting your Reporting Analyst CV

  • Length: While there’s no ‘official’ CV length rule, the majority of recruiters agree that less is more. Aim for two pages of A4 or less. This is just enough room to showcase your suitability to the role, without overwhelming recruiters with irrelevant or excessive content.
  • Readability: To help recruiters quickly skim through your CV, it’s important to format your section headings with bold or a different colour font and break up lengthy paragraphs into short sharp bullet points. This enables them to easily identify important information and assess your suitability.
  • Design & format: It’s generally best to stick to a simple CV design, as funky or elaborate designs rarely add any value to your application. A clear, modern font and a subtle colour scheme work perfectly and allow your skills, experience and achievements to speak for themselves.
  • Photos: Headshot photos aren’t required in a CV by most employers, but some creative and artistic industries like to see them. If you decide to include one, make sure you look smart and professional in the picture.

 

Quick tip: Creating a professional CV style can be difficult and time-consuming when using Microsoft Word or Google Docs. To create a winning CV quickly, try our quick-and-easy CV Builder and use one of their eye-catching professional CV templates.

 

CV formatting tips

 

 

CV structure

As you write your CV, work to the simple but effective structure below:

  • Name and contact details – Pop them at the top of your CV, so it’s easy for recruiters to contact you.
  • CV profile – Write a snappy overview of what makes you a good fit for the role; discussing your key experience, skills and accomplishments.
  • Core skills section – Add a short but snappy list of your relevant skills and knowledge.
  • Work experience – A list of your relevant work experience, starting with your current role.
  • Education – A summary of your relevant qualifications and professional/vocational training.
  • Hobbies and interests – An optional sections, which you could use to write a short description of any relevant hobbies or interests.

Now you understand the basic layout of a CV, here’s what you should include in each section of yours.

 

Contact Details

Contact details

 

Tuck your contact details into the corner of your CV, so that they don’t take up too much space.
Stick to the basic details, such as:

  • Mobile number
  • Email address – It should sound professional, such as your full name.
  • Location -Just write your rough location, rather than your full address.
  • LinkedIn profile or portfolio URL – If you include these, ensure they’re sleek, professional and up-to-date.

 

Reporting Analyst CV Profile

Your CV profile is the first thing recruiters will read – so your goal is to give them a reason to read onto the end of the document!

Create a short and snappy paragraph that showcases your key skills, relevant experience and impressive accomplishments.

Ultimately, it should prove to the reader that you’ve got what it takes to carry out the job.

 

CV profile

 

How to write a good CV profile:

  • Make it short and sharp: The best CV profiles are short, sharp and highly relevant to the target role. For this reason, it’s best to write 3-4 lines of high-level information, as anything over might be missed.
  • Tailor it: Not tailoring your profile (and the rest of your CV) to the role you’re applying for, is the worst CV mistake you could make. Before setting pen to paper, look over the job ad and make a note of the skills and experience required. Then, incorporate your findings throughout.
  • Don’t add an objective: Avoid discussing your career goals in your CV profile – if you think they’re necessary, briefly mention them in your cover letter instead.
  • Avoid generic phrases: If there’s one thing that’ll annoy a recruiter, it’s a clichè-packed CV. Focus on showcasing your hard skills, experience and the results you’ve gained in previous roles, which will impress recruiters far more.

 

Example CV profile for Reporting Analyst

Detail-oriented Reporting Analyst with over 10 years of experience in the field, delivering actionable insights to drive business growth within the insurance and retail sectors. Highly skilled in data analysis, visualisation, and reporting tools, with expertise in SQL, Tableau, and Power BI. Proven track record in executing end-to-end projects and transforming complex data into meaningful reports and presentations.

 

What to include in your Reporting Analyst CV profile?

  • Experience overview: Start with a brief summary of your relevant experience so far. How many years experience do you have? What type of companies have you worked for? What industries/sectors have you worked in? What are your specialisms?
  • Targeted skills: Employers need to know what skills you can bring to their organisation, and ideally they want to see skills that match their job vacancy. So, research your target roles thoroughly and add the most important Reporting Analyst skills to your profile.
  • Important qualifications: If you have any qualifications which are highly relevant to Reporting Analyst jobs, then highlight them in your profile so that employers do not miss them.

 

Quick tip: If you are finding it difficult to write an attention-grabbing CV profile, choose from hundreds of pre-written profiles across all industries, and add one to your CV with one click in our quick-and-easy CV Builder. All profiles are written by recruitment experts and easily tailored to suit your unique skillset.

 

Core skills section

In addition to your CV profile, your core skills section provides an easily digestible snapshot of your skills – perfect for grabbing the attention of busy hiring managers.

As Reporting Analyst jobs might receive a huge pile of applications, this is a great way to stand out and show off your suitability for the role.

It should be made up of 2-3 columns of bullet points and be made up of skills that are highly relevant to the jobs you are targeting.

 

Core skills section CV

 

Important skills for your Reporting Analyst CV

Data Analysis – Collecting, cleaning, and analysing data to extract meaningful insights and identify trends, using tools like Excel, SQL, or data visualization software.

Statistical Analysis – Utilising knowledge of statistical techniques and software (e.g., R, Python, or SPSS) to conduct advanced data analysis, regression modeling, and hypothesis testing.

Data Visualisation – Creating compelling visualisations (charts, graphs, dashboards) that effectively communicate complex data findings to stakeholders using tools like Tableau or Power BI.

SQL Querying – Utilising strong SQL skills to retrieve, manipulate, and transform data from relational databases, ensuring data accuracy and consistency.

Business Intelligence (BI) Tools – Utilising BI software like Tableau, QlikView, or MicroStrategy to create interactive reports and dashboards for decision-makers.

Programming – Utilising programming languages such as Python, R, or VBA for automating data analysis tasks and developing custom reporting solutions.

Database Management – Utilising knowledge of database management systems (e.g., MySQL, Oracle, SQL Server) to maintain and optimise data repositories.

Report Automation – Automating recurring reporting processes, saving time, and reducing errors through tools like Excel macros or scripting.

Financial Analysis – Utilising knowledge of financial concepts and metrics to perform financial data analysis, forecasting, and budgeting as required in financial reporting roles.

Critical Thinking – Assessing data quality, identifying anomalies, and providing data-driven recommendations for business improvements.

 

Quick tip: Our quick-and-easy CV Builder has thousands of in-demand skills for all industries and professions, that can be added to your CV in seconds – This will save you time and ensure you get noticed by recruiters.

 

CV builder

 

Work experience

Recruiters will be itching to know more about your relevant experience by now.

Kick-start this section with your most recent (or current) position, and work your way backwards through your history.

You can include voluntary and freelance work, too – as long as you’re honest about the nature of the work.

 
Work experience
 

Structuring each job

Whilst writing your CV, it’s essential to look at it from the eyes of a recruiter.

If they’re met with giant blocks of text which are impossible to navigate, they might get frustrated and skip onto the next CV.

Instead, make use of the 3-step structure shown below, to give them a pleasant reading experience.

 
Role descriptions
 

Outline

Start with a 1-2 sentence summary of your role as a whole, detailing what the goal of your position was, who you reported to or managed, and the type of organisation you worked for.

 

Key responsibilities

Follow with a snappy list of bullet points, detailing your daily duties and responsibilities.

Tailor it to the role you’re applying for by mentioning how you put the target employer’s desired hard skills and knowledge to use in this role.

 

Key achievements

Round up each role by listing 1-3 key achievements, accomplishments or results.

Wherever possible, quantify them using hard facts and figures, as this really helps to prove your value.

 

Sample job description for Reporting Analyst CV

Outline

Collaborate with the business intelligence team at Atlantic Merchandise, a leading consumer goods retail company with multiple locations across Europe and North America, to develop and deliver comprehensive reporting solutions.

Key Responsibilities

  • Gather and analyse data from various sources to identify trends, patterns, and insights
  • Design and develop complex SQL queries to extract and manipulate data for reporting purposes
  • Create and maintain interactive dashboards using Tableau and Power BI for real-time monitoring
  • Collaborate with stakeholders to understand reporting needs and deliver accurate and timely reports

 

Quick tip: Create impressive job descriptions easily in our quick-and-easy CV Builder by adding pre-written job phrases for every industry and career stage.

 

 

Education section

After your work experience, your education section should provide a detailed view of your academic background.

Begin with those most relevant to Reporting Analyst jobs, such as vocational training or degrees.
If you have space, you can also mention your academic qualifications, such as A-Levels and GCSEs.

Focus on the qualifications that are most relevant to the jobs you are applying for.

 

Hobbies and interests

Although this is an optional section, it can be useful if your hobbies and interests will add further depth to your CV.

Interests which are related to the sector you are applying to, or which show transferable skills like leadership or teamwork, can worth listing.

On the other hand, generic hobbies like “going out with friends” won’t add any value to your application, so are best left off your CV.

 

CV builder

An interview-winning CV for a Reporting Analyst role, needs to be both visually pleasing and packed with targeted content.

Whilst it needs to detail your experience, accomplishments and relevant skills, it also needs to be as clear and easy to read as possible.

Remember to research the role and review the job ad before applying, so you’re able to match yourself up to the requirements.

If you follow these guidelines and keep motivated in your job search, you should land an interview in no time.

Best of luck with your next application!