Monitoring and Evaluation Assistant CV example

As a Monitoring and Evaluation Assistant, showcasing your analytical skills and attention to detail is crucial for your next career move.

We’ve crafted this handy guide to help you refine your CV, ensuring it reflects your proficiency in assessing projects and programmes.

Dive into our Monitoring and Evaluation Assistant CV example below for a model that’s sure to make your application stand out.

 

 

 

Monitoring and Evaluation Assistant CV example

Monitoring and Evaluation Assistant CV 1

Monitoring and Evaluation Assistant CV 2

 

This example CV demonstrates how to structure and format your own Monitoring and Evaluation Assistant CV, so that it can be easily digested by busy hiring managers, and quickly prove why you are suitable for the jobs you are applying to.

It also gives you a good idea of the type of skills, experience and qualifications that you need to be highlighting in your CV.

 

CV builder

 

Monitoring and Evaluation Assistant CV format and structure

Recruiters and employers are busy, and if they can’t find the information they’re looking for in a few seconds, it could be game over for your application.

You need to format and structure your CV in a way which allows the reader to pick out your key information with ease, even if they’re strapped for time.

It should be clear, easily legible, well-organised and scannable – check out some simple tips and tricks below:

 

How to write a CV

 

Tips for formatting your Monitoring and Evaluation Assistant CV

  • Length: Two sides of A4 makes for the perfect CV length, though one page is okay for less experienced applicants. This forces you to make sure that every single sentence adds value to your CV and ensures you avoid unnecessary  info.
  • Readability: Recruiters appreciate CVs that they can quickly scan through without trouble. Ensure yours makes the cut by formatting your headings for attention (bold or coloured fonts should do the trick) and breaking up long paragraphs into smaller chunks or short, snappy bullet points.
  • Design & format: The saying ‘less is more’ couldn’t be more applicable to CVs. Readability is key, so avoid overly complicated designs and graphics. A subtle colour palette and easy-to-read font is all you need!
  • Photos: Profile photos or aren’t a requirement for most industries, so you don’t need to add one in the UK – but if you do, just make sure it looks professional

 

Quick tip: Creating a professional CV style can be difficult and time-consuming when using Microsoft Word or Google Docs. To create a winning CV quickly, try our quick-and-easy CV Builder and use one of our eye-catching professional CV templates.

 

CV formatting tips

 

 

CV structure

When writing your CV, break up the content into the following key sections, to ensure it can be easily digested by busy recruiters and hiring managers:

  • Contact details – Always list these at the very top of your CV – you don’t want them to be missed!
  • Profile – An introductory paragraph, intended to grab recruiters attention and summarise your offering.
  • Work experience / career history – Working from your current role and working backwards, list your relevant work experience.
  • Education – Create a snappy summary of your education and qualifications.
  • Interest and hobbies – An optional section to document any hobbies that demonstrate transferable skills.

Now you understand the basic layout of a CV, here’s what you should include in each section of yours.

 

Contact Details

Contact details

 

Write your contact details in the top corner of your CV, so that they’re easy to find but don’t take up too much space.

You only need to list your basic details, such as:

  • Mobile number
  • Email address
  • Location – Don’t list your full address. Your town or city, such as ‘Norwich’ or ‘Coventry’ is perfect.
  • LinkedIn profile or portfolio URL – Remember to update these before listing them on an application.

 

Monitoring and Evaluation Assistant CV Profile

Your CV profile (or personal statement, if you’re an entry-level applicant) provides a brief overview of your skills, abilities and suitability for a position.

It’s ideal for busy recruiters and hiring managers, who don’t want to waste time reading unsuitable applications.

Think of it as your personal sales pitch. You’ve got just a few lines to sell yourself and prove you’re a great match for the job – make it count!

 

CV profile

 

How to write a good CV profile:

  • Make it short and sharp: It might be tempting to submit a page-long CV profile, but recruiters won’t have the time to read it. To ensure every word gets read, it’s best to include high-level information only; sticking to a length of 3-5 lines.
  • Tailor it: Not tailoring your profile (and the rest of your CV) to the role you’re applying for, is the worst CV mistake you could make. Before setting pen to paper, look over the job ad and make a note of the skills and experience required. Then, incorporate your findings throughout.
  • Don’t add an objective: Leave your career objectives or goals out of your profile. You only have limited space to work with, so they’re best suited to your cover letter.
  • Avoid generic phrases: “Determined team player who always gives 110%” might seem like a good way to fill up your CV profile, but generic phrases like this won’t land you an interview. Recruiters hear them time and time again and have no real reason to believe them. Instead, pack your profile with your hard skills and tangible achievements.

 

Example CV profile for Monitoring and Evaluation Assistant

Passionate Monitoring and Evaluation Assistant with 3 years of experience in optimising systems which track progress and measure the impact that non-profit organisations have. Proven ability to help in the planning and execution of baseline research aspects, mid-term reviews, and end-of-project assessments. Focused on engaging with donors to offer updates, share results, and address inquiries concerning monitoring and evaluation.

 

What to include in your Monitoring and Evaluation Assistant CV profile?

  • Experience overview: To give employers an idea of your capabilities, show them your track record by giving an overview of the types of companies you have worked for in the past and the roles you have carried out for previous employers – but keep it high level and save the details for your experience section.
  • Targeted skills: Employers need to know what skills you can bring to their organisation, and ideally they want to see skills that match their job vacancy. So, research your target roles thoroughly and add the most important Monitoring and Evaluation Assistant skills to your profile.
  • Important qualifications: Be sure to outline your relevant Monitoring and Evaluation Assistant qualifications, so that anyone reading the CV can instantly see you are qualified for the jobs you are applying to.

 

Quick tip: If you are finding it difficult to write an attention-grabbing CV profile, choose from hundreds of pre-written profiles across all industries, and add one to your CV with one click in our quick-and-easy CV Builder. All profiles are written by recruitment experts and easily tailored to suit your unique skillset.

 

Core skills section

Create a core skills section underneath your profile to spotlight your most in-demand skills and grab the attention of readers.

This section should feature 2-3 columns of bullet points that emphasise your applicable skills for your target jobs. Before constructing this section, review the job description and compile a list of any specific skills, specialisms, or knowledge required.

 

Core skills section CV

 

Important skills for your Monitoring and Evaluation Assistant CV

Data Collection Methods – Implementing various data collection techniques, including surveys, interviews, and focus groups, to gather relevant information for programme evaluation.

Quantitative Analysis – Applying statistical methods and software to analyse numerical data and interpret results to inform decision-making.

Qualitative Analysis – Conducting thematic analysis of non-numerical data to uncover patterns and insights in programme outcomes and processes.

Monitoring Frameworks – Establishing and utilising logical frameworks and indicators to monitor progress towards programme objectives and targets.

Evaluation Design – Crafting evaluation studies to assess the effectiveness, efficiency, relevance, and sustainability of programmes and interventions.

Report Writing – Compiling clear and concise evaluation reports, presenting findings, conclusions, and recommendations to stakeholders.

Database Management – Maintaining and updating databases to ensure accurate and accessible data for monitoring and evaluation purposes.

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) – Using GIS tools to visualise and analyse spatial data, contributing to more effective programme monitoring.

Results-Based Management – Implementing a results-oriented approach to programme planning and performance measurement.

Project Management – Coordinating M&E activities within a project lifecycle, ensuring that tasks are completed on schedule and within scope.

 

Quick tip: Our quick-and-easy CV Builder has thousands of in-demand skills for all industries and professions, that can be added to your CV in seconds – This will save you time and ensure you get noticed by recruiters.

 

CV builder

 

Work experience

Recruiters will be itching to know more about your relevant experience by now.

Kick-start this section with your most recent (or current) position, and work your way backwards through your history.

You can include voluntary and freelance work, too – as long as you’re honest about the nature of the work.

 

CV work experience order

 

Structuring each job

If you don’t pay attention to the structure of your career history section, it could quickly become bulky and overwhelming.

Get in recruiters’ good books by creating a pleasant reading experience, using the 3-step structure below:

 

CV role descriptions

 

Outline

Provide a brief overview of the job as a whole, such as what the overriding purpose of your job was and what type of company you worked for.

 

Key responsibilities

Use bullet points to detail the key responsibilities of your role, highlighting hard skills, software and knowledge wherever you can.

Keep them short and sharp to make them easily digestible by readers.

 

Key achievements

To finish off each role and prove the impact you made, list 1-3 stand out achievements, results or accomplishments.

This could be anything which had a positive outcome for the company you worked for, or perhaps a client/customer.
Where applicable, quantify your examples with facts and figures.

 

Sample job description for Monitoring and Evaluation Assistant CV

Outline

Work on regional projects related to social welfare, advocacy campaigns, gender equality community development, and humanitarian aid, for an international Christian NPO that is known for its commitment to serving individuals and populations in need.

Key Responsibilities

  • Support M&E activities, outputs, and outcomes against predefined indicators and targets.
  • Implement instruments for gathering data, such as surveys, interviews, focus group discussions, and observation protocols.
  • Collect quantitative and qualitative information from programme beneficiaries and partners using various methods.
  • Ensure confidentiality and compliance with GDPR and other relevant regulations.

 

Quick tip: Create impressive job descriptions easily in our quick-and-easy CV Builder by adding pre-written job phrases for every industry and career stage.

 

 

Education section

In your education section, make any degrees, qualifications or training which are relevant to Monitoring and Evaluation Assistant roles a focal point.

As well as mentioning the name of the organisation, qualification titles and dates of study, you should showcase any particularly relevant modules, assignments or projects.

 

Hobbies and interests

This section is entirely optional, so you’ll have to use your own judgement to figure out if it’s worth including.

If your hobbies and interests could make you appear more suitable for your dream job, then they are definitely worth adding.

Interests which are related to the industry, or hobbies like sports teams or volunteering, which display valuable transferable skills might be worth including.

 

CV builder

 

Once you’ve written your Monitoring and Evaluation Assistant CV, you should proofread it several times to ensure that there are no typos or grammatical errors.

With a tailored punchy profile that showcases your relevant experience and skills, paired with well-structured role descriptions, you’ll be able to impress employers and land interviews.

Good luck with your next job application!