Commercial CV examples

Andrew Fennell Andrew Fennell

When you’re working in the commercial arm of business, you need to prove your worth to the recruiter if you want them to invite you in for an interview.

This means carefully highlighting your skills, experience and key achievements on your CV.

To help you craft such an impressive application, we’ve put together our top tips below, complete with 3 commercial CV examples for additional support.

 

 

 

Commercial CV example 1

Commercial CV 1

Commercial CV 2

 

Commercial CV example 2

Sales Representative CV 1

Sales Representative CV 2

 

Commercial CV example 3

Construction Project Manager CV-1

Construction Project Manager CV-2

 

These are a good examples of Commercial CVs which are professionally formatted, and structured in a way that allows recruiters to easily find and understand the candidate’s key selling points.

Take some time to look at this CV and refer to it throughout the writing of your own CV for best results.

 

CV builder

 

Commercial CV structure & formatting

Your CV is the first impression you’ll make on anybody who reads it.

A disorganised, cluttered and barely-readable CV could seriously decrease your chances of landing interviews, so it’s essential to make sure yours is slick, professional and easy to navigate.

You can do this by using a clear structure and formatting your content with some savvy formatting techniques – check them out below:

 

How to write a CV

 

How to format your CV

  • Length: Recruiters will be immediately put off by lengthy CVs – with hundreds of applications to read through, they simply don’t have the time! Grabbing their attention with a short, snappy and highly relevant CV is far more likely to lead to success. Aim for two sides of A4 or less.
  • Readability: Columns, lists, bullet points, bold text and subtle colour can all help to aid the readability of your CV. Your overarching goal should be to make the content as easy to read and navigate as possible, whilst also aiming to make your key skills and achievements stand out.
  • CV design: When it comes to CV design, it’s best to keep things simple and sleek. While elaborate designs certainly command attention, it’s not always for the right reasons! Readability is key, so whatever you choose to do, make sure you prioritise readability above everything.
  • Photographs: You can add a profile photo to your CV, if you want to add some personality to it, but they are not a requirement the UK, so you don’t have to.

 

Quick tip: Creating a professional CV style can be difficult and time-consuming when using Microsoft Word or Google Docs. To create a winning CV quickly, try our CV Builder and use one of our eye-catching professional CV templates.

 

CV formatting tips

 

 

CV structure

Divide your CV into the following major sections when writing it:

  • Name and contact details – Head your CV with your name and contact details, to let the reader know who you are and how to contact you.
  • CV profile – A brief paragraph which summarises your skills and experience and highlights why you’re a good match for the role.
  • Core skills list – A snappy, bullet-pointed list of your most relevant skills.
  • Work experience – A structured list of your work experience in reverse chronological order.
  • Education – A summary of any relevant qualifications or professional training you’ve completed.
  • Hobbies and interests – An optional section, which should only be used if your hobbies are relevant to the jobs you’re applying to.

 

Now, let’s take a closer look at what you should include in each section of your CV.

 

CV Contact Details

Contact details

 

Tuck your contact details into the corner of your CV, so that they don’t take up too much space.
Stick to the basic details, such as:

  • Mobile number
  • Email address – It should sound professional, such as your full name.
  • Location -Just write your rough location, rather than your full address.
  • LinkedIn profile or portfolio URL – If you include these, ensure they’re sleek, professional and up-to-date.

 

Commercial CV Profile

Recruiters read through countless applications every day.

If they don’t find what they’re looking for quickly, they’ll simply move onto the next one.

That’s what makes your CV profile (or personal statement, if you’re an entry-level/graduate candidate) so important.

This short and snappy summary sits at the top of your CV, and should give a high-level overview of why you’re a good match for the job.

This way, you can ensure that busy recruiters see your suitability from the outset, and so, feel your CV is worth their time.

 

CV profile

 

CV profile writing tips:

  • Make it short and sharp: Recruiters are busy, so to ensure your profile is actually read, it’s best to keep it short and snappy. 3-5 punchy lines makes for the perfect profile.
  • Tailor it: Recruiters can spot a generic, mass-produced CV at a glance – and they certainly won’t be impressed! Before you write your profile (and CV as a whole), read through the job advert and make a list of any skills, knowledge and experience required. You should then incorporate your findings throughout your profile and the rest of your CV.
  • Don’t add an objective: If you want to discuss your career objectives, save them for your cover letter, rather than wasting valuable CV profile space.
  • Avoid generic phrases: “Determined team player who always gives 110%” might seem like a good way to fill up your CV profile, but generic phrases like this won’t land you an interview. Recruiters hear them time and time again and have no real reason to believe them. Instead, pack your profile with your hard skills and tangible achievements.

 

Example CV profile for Commercial

Dedicated and proven Sales Manager with an extensive and successful sales record of over 13 years, alongside expertly leading dynamic Sales Teams to generate sales growth and exceed targets by developing value-adding sales strategies. Competitive sales professional proficient at orchestrating all aspects of the sales cycle, from consulting with clients to gathering requirements and proposing solutions, to managing contracts and facilitating technical training for end-users. Excellent at identifying top performers and cultivating sales abilities in both new and existing team members, setting ambitious performance goals, and identifying areas for advancement. Passionate about sales processes and developing innovative techniques for sales team development. Focused on customer satisfaction throughout all stages of the sales life cycle, with exceptional drive and dedication to ensure company goals are exceeded.

 

What to include in your Commercial CV profile?

  • Summary of experience: Recruiters will want to know what type of companies you’ve worked for, industries you have knowledge of, and the type of work you’ve carried out in the past, so give them a summary of this in your profile.
  • Relevant skills: Employers need to know what skills you can bring to their organisation, and ideally they want to see skills that match their job vacancy. So, research your target roles thoroughly and add the most important Commercial skills to your profile.
  • Vital qualifications: Be sure to outline your relevant Commercial qualifications, so that anyone reading the CV can instantly see you are qualified for the jobs you are applying to.

 

Quick tip: If you are finding it difficult to write an attention-grabbing CV profile, choose from hundreds of pre-written profiles across all industries, and add one to your CV with one click in our CV Builder. All profiles are written by recruitment experts and easily tailored to suit your unique skillset.

 

Core skills section

Underneath your profile, write a core skills section to make your most relevant skills jump off the page at readers.

It should be made up of 2-3 columns of bullet points of your relevant skills.

Before you do this, look over the job description and make a list of any specific skills, specialisms or knowledge required.

Then, make sure to use your findings in your list. This will paint you as the perfect match for the role.

 

Core skills section CV

 

Vital skills for your Commercial CV

B2B and B2C sales techniques – utilising appropriate sales techniques when selling to individual consumers and other businesses.

Pipeline management – accurately estimating how much revenue will be made from current and future sales opportunities.

Generating compelling customer proposals – creating customer proposals that focus on the benefits of the product or service being sold and encourage customers to purchase.

Negotiating and closing sales – utilising effective strategies to successfully negotiate and finalise sales, ensuring the customer is happy with the product or service being purchased and the company is receiving a positive sales margin.

Sales forecasting – estimating future revenue by predicting the number of products or services a sales unit (which can be an individual salesperson, a sales team, or a company) will sell in the next week, month, quarter, or year.

 

Quick tip: Our CV Builder has thousands of in-demand skills for all industries and professions, that can be added to your CV in seconds – This will save you time and ensure you get noticed by recruiters.

 

CV builder

 

Your work experience section

Now that recruiters have a good overview of your skills and abilities, you need to jump into the detail of your career history.

Give them a more thorough insight into what you can do by creating a detailed list of your relevant experience.

Start with your current role, and work backwards through all the relevant positions you’ve held.
This could be freelance, contract or voluntary work too; as long as it’s related to the role you’re applying for.

 

CV work experience

 

Structuring each role

Lengthy, unbroken chunks of text is a recruiters worst nightmare, but your work experience section can easily end up looking like that if you are not careful.

To avoid this, use my tried-and-tested 3-step structure, as illustrated below:

 

Role descriptions

 

Outline

Start with a solid introduction to your role as a whole, in order to build some context.

Explain the nature of the organisation you worked for, the size of the team you were part of, who you reported to and what the overarching purpose of your job was.

 

Key responsibilities

Next, write up a punchy list of your daily duties and responsibilities, using bullet points.

Wherever you can, point out how you put your hard skills and knowledge to use – especially skills which are applicable to your target role.

 

Key achievements

To finish off each role and prove the impact you made, list 1-3 stand out achievements, results or accomplishments.

This could be anything which had a positive outcome for the company you worked for, or perhaps a client/customer.
Where applicable, quantify your examples with facts and figures.

 

Sample job description for Commercial CV

Outline

Working for a leading retail business, managing a Sales Team of 12. Responsible for leading the team to meet and exceed company KPIs and targets and generate significant company profits.

Key Responsibilities

  • Create sales strategies and plans that align with business goals
  • Support the Sales Team to sell a variety of products in B2B and B2C environments
  • Provide detailed reports and analysis to the company directors regarding regional sales results
  • Review the success of each sales account to predict profits and make accurate sales forecasts

 

Quick tip: Create impressive job descriptions easily in our CV Builder by adding pre-written job phrases for every industry and career stage.

 

 

Education and qualifications section

Next up, you should list your education and qualifications.

This can include your formal qualifications (a degree, A-Levels and GCSEs), as well as sector-specific Commercial qualifications and/or training.

While school leavers and recent grads should include a lot of detail here to make up for the lack of work experience, experienced candidates may benefit from a shorter education section, as your work experience section will be more important to recruiters.

 

Hobbies and interests

The hobbies and interests CV section isn’t mandatory, so don’t worry if you’re out of room by this point.

However, if you have an interesting hobby, or an interest that could make you seem more suitable for the role, then certainly think about adding.

Be careful what you include though… Only consider hobbies that exhibit skills that are required for roles as a Commercial, or transferable workplace skills.

There is never any need to tell employers that you like to watch TV and eat out.

 

CV builder

 

Writing your Commercial CV

Once you’ve written your Commercial CV, you should proofread it several times to ensure that there are no typos or grammatical errors.

With a tailored punchy profile that showcases your relevant experience and skills, paired with well-structured role descriptions, you’ll be able to impress employers and land interviews.

Good luck with your next job application!

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