TV Researcher CV example

We’ve all seen the gripping documentaries, cop shows, gritty dramas and tear-inducing comedies that are available on TV these days.

But these don’t just come out of thin air, and if you want to be a researcher for exciting shows like these, you need to prove you’ve got what it takes.

Find out how to do just that using our comprehensive guide and TV researcher CV example below.

 

 

 

TV Researcher CV example

TV Researcher CV 1

TV Researcher CV 2

 

Before you start writing your CV, take a look at the example TV Researcher CV above to give yourself a good idea of the style and format that works best in today’s job market.

Also, take note of the type of content that is included to impress recruiters, and how the most relevant information is made prominent, to ensure it gets noticed.

 

CV builder

 

TV Researcher CV format and structure

In a highly competitive job market, recruiters and employers are often inundated with applications. If they can’t find what they’re looking for in your CV quickly, they may skip past your application and move on to the next one in their inbox

So, it’s crucial to structure and format your CV in a way that enables them to find your essential details with ease, even if they’re pressed for time.

 

How to write a CV

 

Tips for formatting your TV Researcher CV

  • Length: While there’s no ‘official’ CV length rule, the majority of recruiters agree that less is more. Aim for two pages of A4 or less. This is just enough room to showcase your suitability to the role, without overwhelming recruiters with irrelevant or excessive content.
  • Readability: By clearly formatting your section headings (bold, or a different colour font, do the trick) and breaking up big chunks of text into snappy bullet points, time-strapped recruiters will be able to skim through your CV with ease.
  • Design & format: While it’s important that your CV design looks good, it also needs to be functional (which means easy for recruiters to read) Keep the design simple to achieve a good balance between looking good and reading well.
  • Photos: Don’t add profile photos to your CV unless you work in an industry or region which prefers to see them. Most employers in the UK will not need to see one.

 

Quick tip: Creating a professional CV style can be difficult and time-consuming when using Microsoft Word or Google Docs. To create a winning CV quickly, try our quick-and-easy CV Builder and use one of their eye-catching professional CV templates.

 

CV formatting tips

 

 

CV structure

Divide your CV into the following major sections when writing it:

  • Name and contact details – Head your CV with your name and contact details, to let the reader know who you are and how to contact you.
  • CV profile – A brief paragraph which summarises your skills and experience and highlights why you’re a good match for the role.
  • Core skills list – A snappy, bullet-pointed list of your most relevant skills.
  • Work experience – A structured list of your work experience in reverse chronological order.
  • Education – A summary of any relevant qualifications or professional training you’ve completed.
  • Hobbies and interests – An optional section, which should only be used if your hobbies are relevant to the jobs you’re applying to.

 

Now you understand the basic layout of a CV, here’s what you should include in each section of yours.

 

Contact Details

Contact details

 

Tuck your contact details into the corner of your CV, so that they don’t take up too much space.
Stick to the basic details, such as:

  • Mobile number
  • Email address – It should sound professional, such as your full name.
  • Location -Just write your rough location, rather than your full address.
  • LinkedIn profile or portfolio URL – If you include these, ensure they’re sleek, professional and up-to-date.

 

TV Researcher CV Profile

Make a strong first impression with recruiters by starting your CV with an impactful profile (or personal statement for junior applicants).

This short introduction paragraph should summarise your skills, experience, and knowledge, highlighting your suitability for the job.

It should be compelling enough to encourage recruiters to read through the rest of your CV.

 

CV profile

 

How to write a good CV profile:

  • Make it short and sharp: Aim for a short, snappy paragraph of 3-5 lines. This is just enough room to showcase why you’d make the perfect hire, without going into excessive detail and overwhelming busy recruiters.
  • Tailor it: Recruiters can spot a generic, mass-produced CV at a glance – and they certainly won’t be impressed! Before you write your profile (and CV as a whole), read through the job advert and make a list of any skills, knowledge and experience required. You should then incorporate your findings throughout your profile and the rest of your CV.
  • Don’t add an objective: Avoid discussing your career goals in your CV profile – if you think they’re necessary, briefly mention them in your cover letter instead.
  • Avoid generic phrases: Focus on fact, not fluff. Phrases like “Committed and enthusiastic thought-leader” and “Dynamic problem solver” might sound fancy, but they’ll do nothing for your application. Not only do they sound cheesy, but they have no substance – stick to real skills and facts

 

Example CV profile for TV Researcher

Detail-oriented and versatile TV Researcher with a passion for uncovering compelling stories and insights. Adept at navigating various research methodologies to support the creation of engaging television content. Holds a strong academic background in Media Studies and thrives in fast-paced production environments.

 

What to include in your TV Researcher CV profile?

  • Experience overview: To give employers an idea of your capabilities, show them your track record by giving an overview of the types of companies you have worked for in the past and the roles you have carried out for previous employers – but keep it high level and save the details for your experience section.
  • Targeted skills: Employers need to know what skills you can bring to their organisation, and ideally they want to see skills that match their job vacancy. So, research your target roles thoroughly and add the most important TV Researcher skills to your profile.
  • Important qualifications: If you have any qualifications which are highly relevant to TV Researcher jobs, then highlight them in your profile so that employers do not miss them.

 

Quick tip: If you are finding it difficult to write an attention-grabbing CV profile, choose from hundreds of pre-written profiles across all industries, and add one to your CV with one click in our quick-and-easy CV Builder. All profiles are written by recruitment experts and easily tailored to suit your unique skillset.

 

Core skills section

In addition to your CV profile, your core skills section provides an easily digestible snapshot of your skills – perfect for grabbing the attention of busy hiring managers.

As TV Researcher jobs might receive a huge pile of applications, this is a great way to stand out and show off your suitability for the role.

It should be made up of 2-3 columns of bullet points and be made up of skills that are highly relevant to the jobs you are targeting.

 

Core skills section CV

 

Important skills for your TV Researcher CV

Research Methodology – Using various research methods, such as qualitative and quantitative research, to gather information and data for television production.

Content Analysis – Analysing and evaluating existing television content, identifying trends, themes, and potential areas for improvement or innovation.

Media Archives – Using media archives and databases to access historical footage, images, and documents relevant to TV production.

Interviewing – Conducting interviews with subjects, experts, and potential contributors for TV programs, documentaries, or news segments.

Script Development – Assisting with script development, including writing, editing, and refining scripts for TV shows or segments.

Casting and Talent Coordination – Identifying and coordinating talent, contributors, and experts for TV programs, ensuring suitability and availability.

Market Research – Conducting market research and audience analysis to understand viewer preferences and target demographics.

Legal and Compliance Knowledge – Maintaining familiarity with legal and compliance requirements related to TV production, including copyright, libel, and privacy laws.

Budgeting and Resource Management – Using budgeting and resource allocation to ensure efficient use of financial and production resources.

Production Software – Using production software such as video editing tools, graphics software, and scheduling software to support TV production tasks.

 

Quick tip: Our quick-and-easy CV Builder has thousands of in-demand skills for all industries and professions, that can be added to your CV in seconds – This will save you time and ensure you get noticed by recruiters.

 

CV builder

 

Work experience

Now that recruiters have a good overview of your skills and abilities, you need to jump into the detail of your career history.

Give them a more thorough insight into what you can do by creating a detailed list of your relevant experience.

Start with your current role, and work backwards through all the relevant positions you’ve held.
This could be freelance, contract or voluntary work too; as long as it’s related to the role you’re applying for.

 
Work experience
 

Structuring each job

Lengthy, unbroken chunks of text is a recruiters worst nightmare, but your work experience section can easily end up looking like that if you are not careful.

To avoid this, use my tried-and-tested 3-step structure, as illustrated below:

 
Role descriptions
 

Outline

Firstly, give the reader some context by creating a punchy summary of the job as a whole.

You should mention what the purpose or goal of your role was, what team you were part of and who you reported to.

 

Key responsibilities

Use bullet points to detail the key responsibilities of your role, highlighting hard skills, software and knowledge wherever you can.

Keep them short and sharp to make them easily digestible by readers.

 

Key achievements

Lastly, add impact by highlight 1-3 key achievements that you made within the role.

Struggling to think of an achievement? If it had a positive impact on your company, it counts.

For example, you might increased company profits, improved processes, or something simpler, such as going above and beyond to solve a customer’s problem.

 

Sample job description for TV Researcher CV

Outline

Contribute to the research and development of documentary projects for a leading UK production company, ensuring the creation of captivating content that resonates with target audiences.

Key Responsibilities

  • Conduct comprehensive research on various subjects, sourcing data from reputable academic and industry sources
  • Analyse viewership trends and audience demographics to inform content strategies
  • Collaborate with producers to brainstorm unique concepts for documentaries
  • Assist in crafting engaging scripts and treatments by integrating research findings

 

Quick tip: Create impressive job descriptions easily in our quick-and-easy CV Builder by adding pre-written job phrases for every industry and career stage.

 

 

Education section

Next up, you should list your education and qualifications.

This can include your formal qualifications (a degree, A-Levels and GCSEs), as well as sector-specific TV Researcher qualifications and/or training.

While school leavers and recent grads should include a lot of detail here to make up for the lack of work experience, experienced candidates may benefit from a shorter education section, as your work experience section will be more important to recruiters.

 

Hobbies and interests

Although this is an optional section, it can be useful if your hobbies and interests will add further depth to your CV.

Interests which are related to the sector you are applying to, or which show transferable skills like leadership or teamwork, can worth listing.

On the other hand, generic hobbies like “going out with friends” won’t add any value to your application, so are best left off your CV.

 

CV builder

When putting together your TV Researcher CV, there are a few key points to remember

Always tailor your CV to the target role, even if it means creating several versions for different roles.

Additionally, remember that the structure and format of your CV needs just as much attention as the content.

Good luck with your job search!