Planning Engineer CV example

Andrew Fennell Andrew Fennell

You’re organised, coordinated and safety-focused, but how is the recruiter supposed to know that unless you can show them?

We understand that proving these skills on a piece of paper can feel tougher than a steel-toe cap boot, but you need a strong CV if you want to impress.

To help you achieve this, we’ve created a writing guide, along with a planning engineer CV example to support you in writing your own application.

 

 

 

Planning Engineer CV example

Planning Engineer CV 1

Planning Engineer CV 2

 

This CV example demonstrates the type of info you should be including within your Planning Engineer CV, as well as how to format and structure the information in a way which looks professional and is easy for time-strapped recruiters to read.

This is the look and feel you should be aiming for, so remember to refer back to it throughout your CV writing process.

 

CV builder

 

Planning Engineer CV layout and format

Your CV is the first impression you’ll make on anybody who reads it.

A disorganised, cluttered and barely-readable CV could seriously decrease your chances of landing interviews, so it’s essential to make sure yours is slick, professional and easy to navigate.

You can do this by using a clear structure and formatting your content with some savvy formatting techniques – check them out below:

 

How to write a CV

 

CV formatting tips

  • Length: Whether you’ve got one year or three decades of experience, your CV should never be more than two sides of A4. Recruiters are busy people who’re often juggling numerous roles and tasks, so they don’t have time to read lengthy applications. If you’re a recent graduate or don’t have much industry experience, one side of A4 is fine.
  • Readability: Columns, lists, bullet points, bold text and subtle colour can all help to aid the readability of your CV. Your overarching goal should be to make the content as easy to read and navigate as possible, whilst also aiming to make your key skills and achievements stand out.
  • Design: When it comes to CV design, it’s best to keep things simple and sleek. While elaborate designs certainly command attention, it’s not always for the right reasons! Readability is key, so whatever you choose to do, make sure you prioritise readability above everything.
  • Avoid photos: Ditch logos, images or profile photos. Not only do they take up valuable space, but they may even distract recruiters from your important written content.

 

Quick tip: Formatting your CV to look professional can be difficult and time-consuming when using Microsoft Word or Google Docs. If you want to create an attractive CV quickly, try our CV Builder and use one of our eye-catching CV templates.

 

CV formatting tips

 

 

CV structure

For easy reading, write your CV to the following CV structure:

  • Contact details – Make it easy for recruiters to get in touch with you by listing your contact details at the top of your CV.
  • Profile – A short and snappy summary of your experience and skills, showcasing what makes you a good fit for the position.
  • Work experience / career history – Note down all your work history, with your current position first, then working backwards.
  • Education – A short list of your academic background and professional/vocational qualifications.
  • Interest and hobbies – This is an optional section, which you can use to highlight any relevant hobbies or interests.

Now I’ll tell you exactly what you should include in each CV section.

 

CV Contact Details

Contact details

 

Tuck your contact details into the corner of your CV, so that they don’t take up too much space.
Stick to the basic details, such as:

  • Mobile number
  • Email address – It should sound professional, such as your full name.
  • Location -Just write your rough location, rather than your full address.
  • LinkedIn profile or portfolio URL – If you include these, ensure they’re sleek, professional and up-to-date.

 

Planning Engineer CV Profile

Recruiters read through countless applications every day.

If they don’t find what they’re looking for quickly, they’ll simply move onto the next one.

That’s what makes your CV profile (or personal statement, if you’re an entry-level/graduate candidate) so important.

This short and snappy summary sits at the top of your CV, and should give a high-level overview of why you’re a good match for the job.

This way, you can ensure that busy recruiters see your suitability from the outset, and so, feel your CV is worth their time.

 

CV profile

 

Tips for creating an strong CV profile:

  • Keep it concise: The best CV profiles are short, sharp and highly relevant to the target role. For this reason, it’s best to write 3-4 lines of high-level information, as anything over might be missed.
  • Tailor it: Before writing your CV, make sure to do some research. Figure out exactly what your desired employers are looking for and make sure that you are making those requirements prominent in your CV profile, and throughout.
  • Don’t add an objective: Want to talk about about your career goals and objectives? While the profile may seem like a good space to do so, they’re actually much better suited to your cover letter.
  • Avoid cliches: “Determined team player who always gives 110%” might seem like a good way to fill up your CV profile, but generic phrases like this won’t land you an interview. Recruiters hear them time and time again and have no real reason to believe them. Instead, pack your profile with your hard skills and tangible achievements.

 

Example CV profile for Planning Engineer

Self-motivated and tenacious Planning Engineer with over 10 years’ experience of project management in the rail sector. Strong technical and practical comprehension of engineering, procurement and construction methods. Adept at managing a busy portfolio and creating robust project plans. Skilled at Risk Management, Change Management, Earned Value Analysis, Completion Forecasting and Status Reporting. Holds an MSc in Engineering Project Management and a Foundation Certificate in Prince2 Project Management.

 

What to include in your Planning Engineer CV profile?

  • Summary of experience: To give employers an idea of your capabilities, show them your track record by giving an overview of the types of companies you have worked for in the past and the roles you have carried out for previous employers – but keep it high level and save the details for your experience section.
  • Relevant skills: Highlight your skills which are most relevant to Planning Engineer jobs, to ensure that recruiters see your most in-demand skills as soon as they open your CV.
  • Essential qualifications: If you have any qualifications which are highly relevant to Planning Engineer jobs, then highlight them in your profile so that employers do not miss them.

 

Quick tip: Struggling to write a powerful profile? Choose from hundreds of pre-written profiles across all industries, and add one to your CV with one click in our CV Builder. All written by recruitment experts and easily tailored to suit your unique skillset.

 

Core skills section

Underneath your profile, write a core skills section to make your most relevant skills jump off the page at readers.

It should be made up of 2-3 columns of bullet points of your relevant skills.

Before you do this, look over the job description and make a list of any specific skills, specialisms or knowledge required.

Then, make sure to use your findings in your list. This will paint you as the perfect match for the role.

 

Core skills section CV

 

Top skills for your Planning Engineer CV

Entire project lifecycle – experience across all elements of the lifecycle including initiation, planning, execution, and closure.

Primavera P6 – utilising enterprise project portfolio management software which includes project management, scheduling, risk analysis, opportunity management, resource management, collaboration and control capabilities.

Rail sector expertise – specific experience relating to the sector you’re looking to join.

Contract management – negotiating the terms and conditions in contracts and ensuring compliance with the agreements to maximise financial and operational performance and minimise risk.

Earned value management – utilising project management methodologies that integrate schedule, costs, and scope to measure project performance and adjust accordingly.

 

Quick tip: Our CV Builder contains thousands of in-demand skills for every profession that can be added to your CV in seconds – saving you time and greatly improving your chances of landing job interviews.

 

CV builder

 

Work experience/Career history

Recruiters will be itching to know more about your relevant experience by now.

Kick-start this section with your most recent (or current) position, and work your way backwards through your history.

You can include voluntary and freelance work, too – as long as you’re honest about the nature of the work.

 

CV work experience

 

Structuring your roles

Recruiters will be keen to gain a better idea of where you’ve worked and how you apply your skill-set in the workplace.

However, if they’re faced with huge, hard-to-read paragraphs, they may just gloss over it and move onto the next application.

To avoid this, use the simple 3-step role structure, as shown below:

 

Role descriptions

 

Outline

Firstly, give the reader some context by creating a punchy summary of the job as a whole.

You should mention what the purpose or goal of your role was, what team you were part of and who you reported to.

 

Key responsibilities

Using easy-to-read bullet points, note down your day-to-day responsibilities in the role.

Make sure to showcase how you used your hard sector skills and knowledge.

 

Key achievements

Finish off by showcasing 1-3 key achievements made within the role.

This could be anything that had a positive effect on your company, clients or customers, such as saving time or money, receiving exemplary feedback or receiving an award.

 

Example job for Planning Engineer CV

Outline

Working in a team of 3 Planning Engineers to set up and manage the Pan TfL Lift installation programme; reporting to the Senior Planning Engineer.

Key Responsibilities

  • Managing the planning and project control aspects of the Pan-TfL lift contract, including implementing change mechanisms under an NEC contract
  • Preparing programmes in relation to scope, quantities and cost data
  • Developing slippage reports, recovery programmes and contingency plans to meet changed objectives
  • Working to make sure the plan is fully resourced and cost loaded

 

Quick tip: Create impressive job descriptions easily in our CV Builder by adding pre-written job phrases for every industry and career stage.

 

 

Education section

At the bottom of your CV is your full education section. You can list your formal academic qualifications, such as:

  • Degree
  • GCSE’s
  • A levels

As well as any specific Planning Engineer qualifications that are essential to the jobs you are applying for. Note down the name of the qualification, the organisation at which you studied, and the date of completion.

 

Interests and hobbies

Although this is an optional section, it can be useful if your hobbies and interests will add further depth to your CV.

Interests which are related to the sector you are applying to, or which show transferable skills like leadership or teamwork, can worth listing.

On the other hand, generic hobbies like “going out with friends” won’t add any value to your application, so are best left off your CV.

 

CV builder

 

Writing your Planning Engineer CV

Creating a strong Planning Engineer CV requires a blend of punchy content, considered structure and format, and heavy tailoring.

By creating a punchy profile and core skills list, you’ll be able to hook recruiter’s attention and ensure your CV gets read.

Remember that research and relevance is the key to a good CV, so research your target roles before you start writing and pack your CV with relevant skills.

Best of luck with your next application!