Outdoor Instructor CV example

As if your sporting abilities weren’t enough, you’re also a great leader and you love teaching people new skills.

But if you’re hoping to land a role as an outdoor instructor, you need a standout CV that proves this.

Sure, it would be easier to show them your hiking, surfing and climbing skills, but as that is not an option, you need a carefully crafted application instead.

Check out our detailed guide and outdoor instructor CV example below.

 

 

 

Outdoor Instructor CV example

Outdoor Instructor CV 1

Outdoor Instructor CV 2

 

This CV example showcases the optimal structure and format for your Outdoor Instructor CV, providing a pleasant reading experience for busy recruiters.

It also demonstrates the skills, experience and qualifications you should emphasize in your own CV to increase your chances of landing job interviews.

 

CV builder

 

Outdoor Instructor CV format and structure

First impressions count, so a sloppy, disorganised CV may cause your CV to be overlooked..

Instead, perfect the format and structure of your CV by working to a clear logical structure and applying some simple formatting tricks to ease readability.

Don’t underestimate the importance of this step; if your CV lacks readability, your written content won’t even be seen.

 

How to write a CV

 

Tips for formatting your Outdoor Instructor CV

  • Length: Recruiters will be immediately put off by lengthy CVs – with hundreds of applications to read through, they simply don’t have the time! Grabbing their attention with a short, snappy and highly relevant CV is far more likely to lead to success. Aim for two sides of A4 or less.
  • Readability: By clearly formatting your section headings (bold, or a different colour font, do the trick) and breaking up big chunks of text into snappy bullet points, time-strapped recruiters will be able to skim through your CV with ease.
  • Design & format: Your CV needs to look professional, sleek and easy to read. A subtle colour palette, clear font and simple design are generally best for this, as fancy designs are often harder to navigate.
  • Photos: Headshot photos aren’t required in a CV by most employers, but some creative and artistic industries like to see them. If you decide to include one, make sure you look smart and professional in the picture.

 

Quick tip: Creating a professional CV style can be difficult and time-consuming when using Microsoft Word or Google Docs. To create a winning CV quickly, try our quick-and-easy CV Builder and use one of their eye-catching professional CV templates.

 

CV formatting tips

 

 

CV structure

As you write your CV, divide and sub-head into the following sections:

  • Name and contact details – Always start with these, so employers know exactly how to get in touch with you.
  • CV profile – Add a short summary of your relevant experience, skills and achievements, which highlights your suitability.
  • Core skills section – A 2-3 columned list of your key skills.
  • Work experience – A detailed list of any relevant work experience, whether paid or voluntary.
  • Education – An overview of your academic background and any training you may have completed.
  • Hobbies and interests – A brief overview of your hobbies and interests, if they’re relevant (optional).

Now you understand the basic layout of a CV, here’s what you should include in each section of yours.

 

Contact Details

Contact details

 

Begin by sharing your contact details, so it’s easy for employers to give you a call.
Keep to the basics, such as:

  • Mobile number
  • Email address – It should sound professional, with no slang or nicknames. Make a new one for your job applications if necessary.
  • Location – Simply share your vague location, for example ‘Manchester’, rather than a full address.
  • LinkedIn profile or portfolio URL – Remember to update them before you send your application.

 

Outdoor Instructor CV Profile

Your CV profile is basically a short introductory paragraph, which summarises your key selling points and highlights why you’d make a good hire.

So, write a well-rounded summary of what you do, what your key skills are, and what relevant experience you have.

It needs to be short, snappy and punchy and, ultimately, entice the reader to read the rest of your CV.

 

CV profile

 

How to write a good CV profile:

  • Make it short and sharp: It might be tempting to submit a page-long CV profile, but recruiters won’t have the time to read it. To ensure every word gets read, it’s best to include high-level information only; sticking to a length of 3-5 lines.
  • Tailor it: No matter how much time you put into your CV profile, it won’t impress if it’s irrelevant to the role you’re applying for. Before you start writing, make a list of the skills, knowledge and experience your target employer is looking for. Then, make sure to mention them in your CV profile and throughout the rest of your application.
  • Don’t add an objective: Avoid discussing your career goals in your CV profile – if you think they’re necessary, briefly mention them in your cover letter instead.
  • Avoid generic phrases: Focus on fact, not fluff. Phrases like “Committed and enthusiastic thought-leader” and “Dynamic problem solver” might sound fancy, but they’ll do nothing for your application. Not only do they sound cheesy, but they have no substance – stick to real skills and facts

 

Example CV profile for Outdoor Instructor

Dedicated and enthusiastic Outdoor Instructor with nearly a decade of experience in facilitating outdoor adventure activities for individuals and groups of all ages and skill levels in Scotland and Wales. BMC-Certified Rock-Climbing Instructor and Mountain Leader, specialising in organising and executing safe and exciting multi-day trips in the mountains. Proficient in utilising various teaching methodologies to cater to diverse learning styles with demonstrated expertise in improving participant’s confidence and organising successful outreach programs.

 

What to include in your Outdoor Instructor CV profile?

  • Experience overview: Recruiters will want to know what type of companies you’ve worked for, industries you have knowledge of, and the type of work you’ve carried out in the past, so give them a summary of this in your profile.
  • Targeted skills: Make your most relevant Outdoor Instructor key skills clear in your profile. These should be tailored to the specific role you’re applying for – so make sure to check the job description first, and aim to match their requirements as closely as you can.
  • Important qualifications: Be sure to outline your relevant Outdoor Instructor qualifications, so that anyone reading the CV can instantly see you are qualified for the jobs you are applying to.

 

Quick tip: If you are finding it difficult to write an attention-grabbing CV profile, choose from hundreds of pre-written profiles across all industries, and add one to your CV with one click in our quick-and-easy CV Builder. All profiles are written by recruitment experts and easily tailored to suit your unique skillset.

 

Core skills section

Underneath your profile, write a core skills section to make your most relevant skills jump off the page at readers.

It should be made up of 2-3 columns of bullet points of your relevant skills.

Before you do this, look over the job description and make a list of any specific skills, specialisms or knowledge required.

Then, make sure to use your findings in your list. This will paint you as the perfect match for the role.

 

Core skills section CV

 

Important skills for your Outdoor Instructor CV

Outdoor Activity Expertise – Maintaining proficiency in a variety of outdoor activities such as hiking, rock climbing, kayaking, or orienteering, depending on the specialty.

Safety Protocols – Utilising knowledge of safety regulations, risk assessment, and emergency procedures to ensure participant safety during outdoor activities.

Navigation and Map Reading – Using maps, compasses, and GPS devices for route planning and navigation in different terrains.

First Aid Certification – Providing first aid and CPR in outdoor environments, addressing common injuries and illnesses that may occur during activities.

Technical Equipment Handling – Operating and maintaining outdoor equipment, including ropes, harnesses, camping gear, and watercraft.

Weather and Environmental Awareness – Maintaining knowledge of weather patterns, environmental conservation principles, and Leave No Trace ethics.

Group Leadership – Maintaining proficiency in group management and leadership, facilitating team dynamics and communication during outdoor experiences.

Teaching and Instruction – Utilising knowledge of instructional techniques to effectively communicate outdoor skills and safety to participants.

Wilderness Survival Skills – Maintaining competency in wilderness survival techniques, including shelter building, fire starting, and foraging for food.

Outdoor Cooking – Cooking and meal preparation in outdoor settings, including knowledge of food safety and outdoor cooking equipment.

 

Quick tip: Our quick-and-easy CV Builder has thousands of in-demand skills for all industries and professions, that can be added to your CV in seconds – This will save you time and ensure you get noticed by recruiters.

 

CV builder

 

Work experience

By this point, employers will be keen to know more detail about you career history.

Starting with your most recent role and working backwards, create a snappy list of any relevant roles you’ve held.

This could be freelance, voluntary, part-time or temporary jobs too. Anything that’s relevant to your target role is well-worth listing!

 

CV work experience

 

Structuring each job

Recruiters will be keen to gain a better idea of where you’ve worked and how you apply your skill-set in the workplace.

However, if they’re faced with huge, hard-to-read paragraphs, they may just gloss over it and move onto the next application.

To avoid this, use the simple 3-step role structure, as shown below:

 

Role descriptions

 

Outline

Start with a solid introduction to your role as a whole, in order to build some context.

Explain the nature of the organisation you worked for, the size of the team you were part of, who you reported to and what the overarching purpose of your job was.

 

Key responsibilities

Next up, you should write a short list of your day-to-day duties within the job.

Recruiters are most interested in your sector-specific skills and knowledge, so highlight these wherever possible.

 

Key achievements

Lastly, add impact by highlight 1-3 key achievements that you made within the role.

Struggling to think of an achievement? If it had a positive impact on your company, it counts.

For example, you might increased company profits, improved processes, or something simpler, such as going above and beyond to solve a customer’s problem.

 

Sample job description for Outdoor Instructor CV

Outline

Work for a leading adventure tour provider in the Snowdonian mountains, guiding outdoor enthusiasts of all ages on unforgettable hiking and climbing day trips.

Key Responsibilities

  • Design and customise outdoor adventure programs tailored to the skill level of participants
  • Lead and guide groups through various terrains, including mountain trails, forests, and rivers, ensuring safety and navigation skills are practiced
  • Conduct pre-expedition briefings, outlining safety protocols and emergency procedures
  • Train participants in wilderness first aid, providing scenarios to practise their skills

 

Quick tip: Create impressive job descriptions easily in our quick-and-easy CV Builder by adding pre-written job phrases for every industry and career stage.

 

 

Education section

At the bottom of your CV is your full education section. You can list your formal academic qualifications, such as:

  • Degree
  • GCSE’s
  • A levels

As well as any specific Outdoor Instructor qualifications that are essential to the jobs you are applying for. Note down the name of the qualification, the organisation at which you studied, and the date of completion.

 

Hobbies and interests

The hobbies and interests CV section isn’t mandatory, so don’t worry if you’re out of room by this point.

However, if you have an interesting hobby, or an interest that could make you seem more suitable for the role, then certainly think about adding.

Be careful what you include though… Only consider hobbies that exhibit skills that are required for roles as a Outdoor Instructor, or transferable workplace skills.

There is never any need to tell employers that you like to watch TV and eat out.

 

CV builder

 

A strong, compelling CV is essential to get noticed and land interviews with the best employers.

To ensure your CV stands out from the competition, make sure to tailor it to your target role and pack it with sector-specific skills and results.

Remember to triple-check for spelling and grammar errors before hitting send.

Good luck with the job search!