Marine Engineer CV example

If trying to write a marine engineer application has left you feeling like a fish out of water, you’ve come to the right place.

In the guide below, we’re going to teach you how to create an impressive CV that is sure to make waves.

We’ll also share a marine engineer CV example to help you craft your own.

 

 

 

Marine Engineer CV example

Marine Engineer CV 1

Marine Engineer CV 2

 

This example CV demonstrates how to structure and format your own Marine Engineer CV, so that it can be easily digested by busy hiring managers, and quickly prove why you are suitable for the jobs you are applying to.

It also gives you a good idea of the type of skills, experience and qualifications that you need to be highlighting in your CV.

 

CV builder

 

Marine Engineer CV format and structure

Your CV is the first impression you’ll make on anybody who reads it.

A disorganised, cluttered and barely-readable CV could seriously decrease your chances of landing interviews, so it’s essential to make sure yours is slick, professional and easy to navigate.

You can do this by using a clear structure and formatting your content with some savvy formatting techniques – check them out below:

 

How to write a CV

 

Tips for formatting your Marine Engineer CV

  • Length: Whether you’ve got one year or three decades of experience, your CV should never be more than two sides of A4. Recruiters are busy people who’re often juggling numerous roles and tasks, so they don’t have time to read lengthy applications. If you’re a recent graduate or don’t have much industry experience, one side of A4 is fine.
  • Readability: By clearly formatting your section headings (bold, or a different colour font, do the trick) and breaking up big chunks of text into snappy bullet points, time-strapped recruiters will be able to skim through your CV with ease.
  • Design & format: It’s generally best to stick to a simple CV design, as funky or elaborate designs rarely add any value to your application. A clear, modern font and a subtle colour scheme work perfectly and allow your skills, experience and achievements to speak for themselves.
  • Photos: Headshot photos aren’t required in a CV by most employers, but some creative and artistic industries like to see them. If you decide to include one, make sure you look smart and professional in the picture.

 

Quick tip: Creating a professional CV style can be difficult and time-consuming when using Microsoft Word or Google Docs. To create a winning CV quickly, try our quick-and-easy CV Builder and use one of their eye-catching professional CV templates.

 

CV formatting tips

 

 

CV structure

When writing your own CV, break up your CV content into the following key sections:

  • Name and contact details – Place them at the top of your CV, so that employers can easily get in touch.
  • CV profile – A punchy sales pitch of your key experience, skills and achievements to reel readers in.
  • Core skills section – A bullet-pointed snapshot of your abilities.
  • Work experience – A well-structured list of your relevant work experience.
  • Education – An overview of any relevant qualifications or professional training you have.
  • Hobbies and interests – A short description of any relevant hobbies or interests (optional).

Now you understand the basic layout of a CV, here’s what you should include in each section of yours.

 

Contact Details

Contact details

 

Write your contact details in the top corner of your CV, so that they’re easy to find but don’t take up too much space.

You only need to list your basic details, such as:

  • Mobile number
  • Email address
  • Location – Don’t list your full address. Your town or city, such as ‘Norwich’ or ‘Coventry’ is perfect.
  • LinkedIn profile or portfolio URL – Remember to update these before listing them on an application.

 

Marine Engineer CV Profile

Your CV profile is basically a short introductory paragraph, which summarises your key selling points and highlights why you’d make a good hire.

So, write a well-rounded summary of what you do, what your key skills are, and what relevant experience you have.

It needs to be short, snappy and punchy and, ultimately, entice the reader to read the rest of your CV.

 

CV profile

 

How to write a good CV profile:

  • Make it short and sharp: The best CV profiles are short, sharp and highly relevant to the target role. For this reason, it’s best to write 3-4 lines of high-level information, as anything over might be missed.
  • Tailor it: If recruiters don’t see your suitability within a few seconds, they may close your CV straight away. Your CV profile should closely match the essential requirements listed in the job ad, so make sure to review them before you write it.
  • Don’t add an objective: If you want to discuss your career objectives, save them for your cover letter, rather than wasting valuable CV profile space.
  • Avoid generic phrases: Clichés like “blue-sky thinker with a go-getter attitude” might sound impressive to you, but they don’t actually tell the recruiter much about you. Concentrate on highlighting hard facts and skills, as recruiters are more likely to take these on board.

 

Example CV profile for Marine Engineer

Certified Marine Engineer with a proven track record of applying advanced engineering principles and cutting-edge techniques to optimise performance and safety of commercial vessels and submarines. Marine Engineering graduate with over 20 years of experience in the maritime industry and in-depth knowledge of the mechanical systems, propulsion, and electrical configuration of large vessels. Skilled in CAD modeling, prototype development, and project management with demonstrated expertise in reducing energy consumption and improving safety ratings.

 

What to include in your Marine Engineer CV profile?

  • Experience overview: Start with a brief summary of your relevant experience so far. How many years experience do you have? What type of companies have you worked for? What industries/sectors have you worked in? What are your specialisms?
  • Targeted skills: Make your most relevant Marine Engineer key skills clear in your profile. These should be tailored to the specific role you’re applying for – so make sure to check the job description first, and aim to match their requirements as closely as you can.
  • Important qualifications: Be sure to outline your relevant Marine Engineer qualifications, so that anyone reading the CV can instantly see you are qualified for the jobs you are applying to.

 

Quick tip: If you are finding it difficult to write an attention-grabbing CV profile, choose from hundreds of pre-written profiles across all industries, and add one to your CV with one click in our quick-and-easy CV Builder. All profiles are written by recruitment experts and easily tailored to suit your unique skillset.

 

Core skills section

Underneath your profile, write a core skills section to make your most relevant skills jump off the page at readers.

It should be made up of 2-3 columns of bullet points of your relevant skills.

Before you do this, look over the job description and make a list of any specific skills, specialisms or knowledge required.

Then, make sure to use your findings in your list. This will paint you as the perfect match for the role.

 

Core skills section CV

 

Important skills for your Marine Engineer CV

Marine Systems Maintenance – Maintaining and repairing various marine systems and equipment, including engines, propulsion systems, and auxiliary machinery.

Ship Design and Construction – Maintaining knowledge of ship design principles and knowledge of shipbuilding processes, materials, and welding techniques.

Navigation and Seamanship – Utilising knowledge of navigation systems, maritime regulations, and seamanship skills for safe vessel operation.

Diesel Engine Repair – Repairing and maintaining marine diesel engines, including troubleshooting issues related to fuel systems, cooling systems, and exhaust systems.

Electrical and Electronics – Maintaining familiarity with electrical systems on board ships, including electrical distribution, communication equipment, and navigation systems.

Welding and Metal Fabrication – Maintaining proficiency in welding techniques, metal fabrication, and repair of ship structures and components.

Safety Procedures – Adhering to safety protocols and practices to prevent accidents and ensure the safety of crew members and vessels.

Hydraulics and Pneumatics – Maintaining knowledge of hydraulic and pneumatic systems used in marine applications, including steering systems and cargo handling equipment.

Environmental Regulations – Understanding and complying with environmental regulations and sustainability practices related to marine operations.

Emergency Response – Responding effectively to emergencies at sea, including fire-fighting, first aid, and emergency evacuation procedures.

 

Quick tip: Our quick-and-easy CV Builder has thousands of in-demand skills for all industries and professions, that can be added to your CV in seconds – This will save you time and ensure you get noticed by recruiters.

 

CV builder

 

Work experience

Now that recruiters have a good overview of your skills and abilities, you need to jump into the detail of your career history.

Give them a more thorough insight into what you can do by creating a detailed list of your relevant experience.

Start with your current role, and work backwards through all the relevant positions you’ve held.
This could be freelance, contract or voluntary work too; as long as it’s related to the role you’re applying for.

 

CV work experience

 

Structuring each job

The structure of your work experience section can seriously affect its impact.

This is generally the biggest section of a CV, and with no thought to structure, it can look bulky and important information can get lost.

Use my 3-step structure below to allow for easy navigation, so employers can find what they are looking for:

 

Role descriptions

 

Outline

Firstly, give the reader some context by creating a punchy summary of the job as a whole.

You should mention what the purpose or goal of your role was, what team you were part of and who you reported to.

 

Key responsibilities

Using easy-to-read bullet points, note down your day-to-day responsibilities in the role.

Make sure to showcase how you used your hard sector skills and knowledge.

 

Key achievements

Lastly, add impact by highlight 1-3 key achievements that you made within the role.

Struggling to think of an achievement? If it had a positive impact on your company, it counts.

For example, you might increased company profits, improved processes, or something simpler, such as going above and beyond to solve a customer’s problem.

 

Sample job description for Marine Engineer CV

Outline

Serve as a vital member of the engineering team at a prestigious UK marine manufacturing company, designing, testing, and refining components to enhance the performance and functionality of commercial vessels and submarines.

Key Responsibilities

  • Utilise CAD software to create detailed 3D models for mechanical and electrical yacht components and systems, optimising efficiency, and minimising production costs
  • Conduct comprehensive testing and analysis of propulsion systems, identifying potential improvements and implementing modifications for optimal performance
  • Collaborate with design engineers to conceptualise and develop innovative vessel systems
  • Perform troubleshooting and maintenance tasks on electrical and mechanical systems, ensuring smooth operations during sea trials and charter periods

 

Quick tip: Create impressive job descriptions easily in our quick-and-easy CV Builder by adding pre-written job phrases for every industry and career stage.

 

 

Education section

After your work experience, your education section should provide a detailed view of your academic background.

Begin with those most relevant to Marine Engineer jobs, such as vocational training or degrees.
If you have space, you can also mention your academic qualifications, such as A-Levels and GCSEs.

Focus on the qualifications that are most relevant to the jobs you are applying for.

 

Hobbies and interests

Although this is an optional section, it can be useful if your hobbies and interests will add further depth to your CV.

Interests which are related to the sector you are applying to, or which show transferable skills like leadership or teamwork, can worth listing.

On the other hand, generic hobbies like “going out with friends” won’t add any value to your application, so are best left off your CV.

 

CV builder

 

An interview-winning CV for a Marine Engineer role, needs to be both visually pleasing and packed with targeted content.

Whilst it needs to detail your experience, accomplishments and relevant skills, it also needs to be as clear and easy to read as possible.

Remember to research the role and review the job ad before applying, so you’re able to match yourself up to the requirements.

If you follow these guidelines and keep motivated in your job search, you should land an interview in no time.

Best of luck with your next application!