Infrastructure Engineer CV example

With so many businesses relying heavily on technology to function, infrastructure engineers are in high demand right now.

That being said, if you hope to secure this position, you still need to create a persuasive CV that highlights your incredible skill set.

To help you do this, we’ve put together a detailed writing guide and an infrastructure engineer CV example. You can check these out below.

 

 

 

Infrastructure Engineer CV example

Infrastructure Engineer CV 1

Infrastructure Engineer CV 2

 

This example CV demonstrates how to structure and format your own Infrastructure Engineer CV, so that it can be easily digested by busy hiring managers, and quickly prove why you are suitable for the jobs you are applying to.

It also gives you a good idea of the type of skills, experience and qualifications that you need to be highlighting in your CV.

 

CV builder

 

Infrastructure Engineer CV layout and format

Recruiters and employers are busy, and if they can’t find the information they’re looking for in a few seconds, it could be game over for your application.

You need to format and structure your CV in a way which allows the reader to pick out your key information with ease, even if they’re strapped for time.

It should be clear, easily legible, well-organised and scannable – check out some simple tips and tricks below:

 

How to write a CV

 

Tips for formatting your Infrastructure Engineer CV

  • Length: Two sides of A4 makes for the perfect CV length, though one page is okay for less experienced applicants. This forces you to make sure that every single sentence adds value to your CV and ensures you avoid unnecessary  info.
  • Readability: Recruiters appreciate CVs that they can quickly scan through without trouble. Ensure yours makes the cut by formatting your headings for attention (bold or coloured fonts should do the trick) and breaking up long paragraphs into smaller chunks or short, snappy bullet points.
  • Design: The saying ‘less is more’ couldn’t be more applicable to CVs. Readability is key, so avoid overly complicated designs and graphics. A subtle colour palette and easy-to-read font is all you need!
  • Photos: Don’t add profile photos to your CV unless you work in an industry or region which prefers to see them. Most employers in the UK will not need to see one.

 

Quick tip: Creating a professional CV style can be difficult and time-consuming when using Microsoft Word or Google Docs. To create a winning CV quickly, try our quick-and-easy CV Builder and use one of their eye-catching professional CV templates.

 

CV formatting tips

 

 

CV structure

As you write your CV, divide and sub-head into the following sections:

  • Name and contact details – Always start with these, so employers know exactly how to get in touch with you.
  • CV profile – Add a short summary of your relevant experience, skills and achievements, which highlights your suitability.
  • Core skills section – A 2-3 columned list of your key skills.
  • Work experience – A detailed list of any relevant work experience, whether paid or voluntary.
  • Education – An overview of your academic background and any training you may have completed.
  • Hobbies and interests – A brief overview of your hobbies and interests, if they’re relevant (optional).

Now you understand the basic layout of a CV, here’s what you should include in each section of yours.

 

Contact Details

Contact details

 

Kick-start your CV with your contact details, so recruiters can get in touch easily.
Here’s what you should include:

  • Mobile number
  • Email address – Make sure it’s professional, with no silly nicknames.
  • Location – Your town or city is sufficient, rather than a full address.
  • LinkedIn profile or portfolio URL – Ensure they’ve been updated and are looking slick and professional.

Quick tip: Avoid listing your date of birth, marital status or other irrelevant details – they’re unnecessary at this stage.

 

Infrastructure Engineer CV Profile

To immediately capture the attention of recruiters, begin your CV with a powerful profile (or personal statement for junior applicants).

This is a brief introductory paragraph that summarises your skills, experience, and knowledge.

It should position you as the ideal candidate for the job and encourage recruiters to read on.

 

CV profile

 

CV profile writing tips:

  • Make it short and sharp: Recruiters are busy, so to ensure your profile is actually read, it’s best to keep it short and snappy. 3-5 punchy lines makes for the perfect profile.
  • Tailor it: Not tailoring your profile (and the rest of your CV) to the role you’re applying for, is the worst CV mistake you could make. Before setting pen to paper, look over the job ad and make a note of the skills and experience required. Then, incorporate your findings throughout.
  • Don’t add an objective: Want to talk about your career goals and objectives? While the profile may seem like a good space to do so, they’re actually much better suited to your cover letter.
  • Avoid generic phrases: If there’s one thing that’ll annoy a recruiter, it’s a clichè-packed CV. Focus on showcasing your hard skills, experience and the results you’ve gained in previous roles, which will impress recruiters far more.

 

Example CV profile for Infrastructure Engineer

Client-oriented Infrastructure Engineer with a passion for modernising and consolidating comprehensive IT components, automating workloads, and pursuing next-generation innovation. Demonstrable experience with numerous cloud computing platforms, such as AWS, GCP, IBM, Azure, Linux that increase collaboration and realise significant cost-savings. Focused on ensuring tickets are actioned using escalation processes where necessary.

 

What to include in your Infrastructure Engineer CV profile?

  • Experience overview: Demonstrate your suitability for your target jobs by giving a high level summary of your previous work work experience, including the industries you have worked in, types of employer, and the type of roles you have previous experience of.
  • Targeted skills: Ensure that your profile highlights your key skills that are most relevant to your Infrastructure Engineer, and tailor them to match the specific job you are applying for. To do this, refer to the job description to closely align your skills with their requirements.
  • Key qualifications: If the jobs you are applying to require candidates to have certain qualifications, then you must add them in your profile to ensure they are seen by hiring managers.

 

Quick tip: If you are finding it difficult to write an attention-grabbing CV profile, choose from hundreds of pre-written profiles across all industries, and add one to your CV with one click in our quick-and-easy CV Builder. All profiles are written by recruitment experts and easily tailored to suit your unique skillset.

 

Core skills section

Create a core skills section underneath your profile to spotlight your most in-demand skills and grab the attention of readers.

This section should feature 2-3 columns of bullet points that emphasise your applicable skills for your target jobs. Before constructing this section, review the job description and compile a list of any specific skills, specialisms, or knowledge required.

 

Core skills section CV

 

Important skills for your Infrastructure Engineer CV

Network Administration – Setting up and maintaining computer networks, including managing network devices, configuring routers, and ensuring secure access.

Virtualisation Technologies – Utilising knowledge of virtualisation technologies, including virtual machines, containers, and hypervisors.

Cloud Computing – Utilising knowledge of cloud computing concepts, including cloud-based infrastructure, networking, and deployment models.

Operating Systems – Utilising knowledge of various operating systems, including Windows, Linux, and Unix, and ability to administer them.

Automation – Utilising knowledge of automation tools and scripting languages such as Python, Perl, and Bash, to automate repetitive tasks and ensure consistency.

Disaster Recovery – Creating and maintaining disaster recovery plans and implementing failover systems to ensure business continuity.

Security – Utilising knowledge of information security principles and experience in implementing security measures, including firewalls, intrusion detection, and penetration testing.

Storage Technologies – Utilising knowledge of storage technologies, including direct-attached storage, network-attached storage, and storage area networks.

Performance Monitoring – Monitoring and analysing system performance and identify areas for improvement, including system resource usage and network traffic.

Project Management – Managing IT infrastructure projects from initiation to completion, including defining project scope, managing stakeholders, and ensuring delivery within budget and timeline.

 

Quick tip: Our quick-and-easy CV Builder has thousands of in-demand skills for all industries and professions, that can be added to your CV in seconds – This will save you time and ensure you get noticed by recruiters.

 

CV builder

 

Work experience section

By now, you’ll have hooked the reader’s attention and need to show them how you apply your skills and knowledge in the workplace, to benefit your employers.

So, starting with your most recent role and working backwards to your older roles, create a thorough summary of your career history to date.

If you’ve held several roles and are struggling for space, cut down the descriptions for your oldest jobs.

 

CV work experience

 

Structuring each job

Whilst writing your CV, it’s essential to look at it from the eyes of a recruiter.

If they’re met with giant blocks of text which are impossible to navigate, they might get frustrated and skip onto the next CV.

Instead, make use of the 3-step structure shown below, to give them a pleasant reading experience.

 

Role descriptions

 

Outline

Start with a solid introduction to your role as a whole, in order to build some context.

Explain the nature of the organisation you worked for, the size of the team you were part of, who you reported to and what the overarching purpose of your job was.

 

Key responsibilities

Next, write up a punchy list of your daily duties and responsibilities, using bullet points.

Wherever you can, point out how you put your hard skills and knowledge to use – especially skills which are applicable to your target role.

 

Key achievements

Round up each role by listing 1-3 key achievements, accomplishments or results.

Wherever possible, quantify them using hard facts and figures, as this really helps to prove your value.

 

Sample job description for an Infrastructure Engineer CV

Outline

Design, build, and maintain platforms that support day-to-day operations, for a global software provider whose products help 10K+ clients increase their delivery, profitability, and environmental performance.

Key Responsibilities

  • Partner with IT functional teams and architects to create scalable, manageable, and predictable virtualised server, network, storage, and datacentre infrastructure.
  • Ensure computing environments are well-provisioned and ready for major application and product migrations.
  • Help with maximising customer experience by using Terraform for automation tasks.
  • Supervise, train, and motivate personnel towards outlining project-based system specifications necessary to ensuring timely technical deliverables.

 

Quick tip: Create impressive job descriptions easily in our quick-and-easy CV Builder by adding pre-written job phrases for every industry and career stage.

 

 

Education and qualifications

After your work experience, your education section should provide a detailed view of your academic background.

Begin with those most relevant to Infrastructure Engineer jobs, such as vocational training or degrees. If you have space, you can also mention your academic qualifications, such as A-Levels and GCSEs.

Focus on the qualifications that are most relevant to the jobs you are applying for.

 

Hobbies and interests

The hobbies and interests CV section isn’t mandatory, so don’t worry if you’re out of room by this point.

However, if you have an interesting hobby, or an interest that could make you seem more suitable for the role, then certainly think about adding.

Be careful what you include though… Only consider hobbies that exhibit skills that are required for roles as a Infrastructure Engineer, or transferable workplace skills.

There is never any need to tell employers that you like to watch TV and eat out.

 

CV builder

An interview-winning CV for a Infrastructure Engineer role, needs to be both visually pleasing and packed with targeted content.

Whilst it needs to detail your experience, accomplishments and relevant skills, it also needs to be as clear and easy to read as possible.

Remember to research the role and review the job ad before applying, so you’re able to match yourself up to the requirements.

If you follow these guidelines and keep motivated in your job search, you should land an interview in no time.

Best of luck with your next application!