Chartered Engineer CV example

As a chartered engineer, your expertise is your signature.

Your CV must convey your advanced skills, innovative solutions, and commitment to professional standards.

Follow our guide to construct a chartered engineer CV that’s as precise and well-engineered as the work you do, with an example to guide your design.

 

 

 

Chartered Engineer CV example

Chartered Engineer CV 1

Chartered Engineer CV 2

 

This CV example illustrates the ideal structure and format for your Chartered Engineer CV, making it easy for busy hiring managers to quickly identify your suitability for the jobs you’re applying for,

It also gives some guidance on the skills, experience and qualifications you should emphasise in your own CV.

 

CV builder

 

Chartered Engineer CV format and structure

Hiring managers and recruiters are frequently overloaded with applications, and if they can’t identify the relevant information in your CV within a few seconds, your application may be overlooked.

To avoid this, it’s essential to format and structure your CV in a manner that makes it simple to pick out the most important information, even if the reader is in a rush.

 

How to write a CV

 

Tips for formatting your Chartered Engineer CV

  • Length: Recruiters will be immediately put off by lengthy CVs – with hundreds of applications to read through, they simply don’t have the time! Grabbing their attention with a short, snappy and highly relevant CV is far more likely to lead to success. Aim for two sides of A4 or less.
  • Readability: To help busy recruiters scan through your CV, make sure your section headings stand out – bold or coloured text works well. Additionally, try to use bullet points wherever you can, as they’re far easier to skim through than huge paragraphs. Lastly, don’t be afraid of white space on your CV – a little breathing space is great for readability.
  • Design & format: When it comes to CV design, it’s best to keep things simple and sleek. While elaborate designs certainly command attention, it’s not always for the right reasons! Readability is key, so whatever you choose to do, make sure you prioritise readability above everything.
  • Photos: Recruiters can’t factor in appearance, gender or race into the recruitment process, so a profile photo is not usually needed. However, creative employers do like to see them, so you can choose to include one if you think it will add value to your CV .

 

Quick tip: Creating a professional CV style can be difficult and time-consuming when using Microsoft Word or Google Docs. To create a winning CV quickly, try our quick-and-easy CV Builder and use one of their eye-catching professional CV templates.

 

CV formatting tips

 

 

CV structure

When writing your CV, break up the content into the following key sections, to ensure it can be easily digested by busy recruiters and hiring managers:

  • Contact details – Always list these at the very top of your CV – you don’t want them to be missed!
  • Profile – An introductory paragraph, intended to grab recruiters attention and summarise your offering.
  • Work experience / career history – Working from your current role and working backwards, list your relevant work experience.
  • Education – Create a snappy summary of your education and qualifications.
  • Interest and hobbies – An optional section to document any hobbies that demonstrate transferable skills.

Now you understand the basic layout of a CV, here’s what you should include in each section of yours.

 

Contact Details

Contact details

 

Start off your CV with a basic list of your contact details.
Here’s what you should include:

  • Mobile number
  • Email address – It’s often helpful to make a new email address, specifically for your job applications.
  • Location – Share your town or city; there’s no need for a full address.
  • LinkedIn profile or portfolio URL – Make sure the information on them is coherent with your CV, and that they’re up-to-date

Quick tip: Delete excessive details, such as your date of birth or marital status. Recruiters don’t need to know this much about you, so it’s best to save the space for your other CV sections.

 

Chartered Engineer CV Profile

To immediately capture the attention of recruiters, begin your CV with a powerful profile (or personal statement for junior applicants).

This is a brief introductory paragraph that summarises your skills, experience, and knowledge.

It should position you as the ideal candidate for the job and encourage recruiters to read on.

 

CV profile

 

How to write a good CV profile:

  • Make it short and sharp: Recruiters are busy, so to ensure your profile is actually read, it’s best to keep it short and snappy. 3-5 punchy lines makes for the perfect profile.
  • Tailor it: No matter how much time you put into your CV profile, it won’t impress if it’s irrelevant to the role you’re applying for. Before you start writing, make a list of the skills, knowledge and experience your target employer is looking for. Then, make sure to mention them in your CV profile and throughout the rest of your application.
  • Don’t add an objective: You only have a small space for your CV profile, so avoid writing down your career goals or objectives. If you think these will help your application, incorporate them into your cover letter instead.
  • Avoid generic phrases: If there’s one thing that’ll annoy a recruiter, it’s a clichè-packed CV. Focus on showcasing your hard skills, experience and the results you’ve gained in previous roles, which will impress recruiters far more.

 

Example CV profile for a Chartered Engineer

Dedicated Chartered Engineer with 17+ years of experience in overseeing the fabrication of water systems, power plants, retail outlets, marine ports, stadiums, solar farms, factories, highways, and houses among others. Strong understanding of dynamic analysis for structures subjected to seismic activity, temperature variations, wind, traffic, or hydrostatic pressure. Knowledge of geotechnical principles and their application to slope stability.

 

What to include in your Chartered Engineer CV profile?

  • Experience overview: To give employers an idea of your capabilities, show them your track record by giving an overview of the types of companies you have worked for in the past and the roles you have carried out for previous employers – but keep it high level and save the details for your experience section.
  • Targeted skills: Employers need to know what skills you can bring to their organisation, and ideally they want to see skills that match their job vacancy. So, research your target roles thoroughly and add the most important Chartered Engineer skills to your profile.
  • Important qualifications: Be sure to outline your relevant Chartered Engineer qualifications, so that anyone reading the CV can instantly see you are qualified for the jobs you are applying to.

 

Quick tip: If you are finding it difficult to write an attention-grabbing CV profile, choose from hundreds of pre-written profiles across all industries, and add one to your CV with one click in our quick-and-easy CV Builder. All profiles are written by recruitment experts and easily tailored to suit your unique skillset.

 

Core skills section

Underneath your profile, write a core skills section to make your most relevant skills jump off the page at readers.

It should be made up of 2-3 columns of bullet points of your relevant skills.

Before you do this, look over the job description and make a list of any specific skills, specialisms or knowledge required.

Then, make sure to use your findings in your list. This will paint you as the perfect match for the role.

 

Core skills section CV

 

Important skills for your Chartered Engineer CV

Advanced Engineering Knowledge – Deep understanding of engineering principles and theories in their specific field, whether it be civil, mechanical, electrical, or another discipline.

Project Management – Expertise in managing engineering projects from inception to completion, including planning, execution, and resource management.

Technical Design and Analysis – Proficiency in designing complex systems or structures, using analytical methods and tools to ensure functionality and safety.

Software Proficiency – Competence in using industry-standard engineering software for design, simulation, and analysis, such as AutoCAD, MATLAB, or SolidWorks.

Quality Assurance and Control – Implementing and overseeing quality assurance processes to ensure engineering projects meet required standards.

Regulatory Compliance – Knowledge of UK and international engineering standards and regulations, ensuring all work is compliant.

Health and Safety Management – Understanding of health and safety practices, risk assessments, and mitigation strategies in engineering environments.

Sustainable Design and Environmental Awareness – Incorporating sustainable practices and environmental considerations into engineering projects.

Technical Reporting and Documentation – Ability to produce detailed technical reports and documentation, presenting complex information clearly and concisely.

Leadership and Team Collaboration – Leading and collaborating effectively with multidisciplinary teams, fostering teamwork and innovation.

 

Quick tip: Our quick-and-easy CV Builder has thousands of in-demand skills for all industries and professions, that can be added to your CV in seconds – This will save you time and ensure you get noticed by recruiters.

 

CV builder

 

Work experience

Next up is your work experience section, which is normally the longest part of your CV.

Start with your current (or most recent) job and work your way backwards through your experience.

Can’t fit all your roles? Allow more space for your recent career history and shorten down descriptions for your older roles.

 
Work experience
 

Structuring each job

Whilst writing your CV, it’s essential to look at it from the eyes of a recruiter.

If they’re met with giant blocks of text which are impossible to navigate, they might get frustrated and skip onto the next CV.

Instead, make use of the 3-step structure shown below, to give them a pleasant reading experience.

 
Role descriptions
 

Outline

Provide a brief overview of the job as a whole, such as what the overriding purpose of your job was and what type of company you worked for.

 

Key responsibilities

Follow with a snappy list of bullet points, detailing your daily duties and responsibilities.

Tailor it to the role you’re applying for by mentioning how you put the target employer’s desired hard skills and knowledge to use in this role.

 

Key achievements

Round up each role by listing 1-3 key achievements, accomplishments or results.

Wherever possible, quantify them using hard facts and figures, as this really helps to prove your value.

 

Sample job description for Chartered Engineer CV

Outline

Develop models for various structures by considering load-bearing capacity, materials, and environmental conditions, for an organisation that is involved in global projects covering a broad spectrum of industries.

Key Responsibilities

  • Present proposals and interface with clients to understand their requirements and preferences.
  • Obtain necessary approvals, permits, wall agreements from relevant government authorities.
  • Leverage CAD software and other tools to create detailed drawings.
  • Manage budgets and timelines, while discovering ways of cutting expenses.

 

Quick tip: Create impressive job descriptions easily in our quick-and-easy CV Builder by adding pre-written job phrases for every industry and career stage.

 

 

Education section

Next up, you should list your education and qualifications.

This can include your formal qualifications (a degree, A-Levels and GCSEs), as well as sector-specific Chartered Engineer qualifications and/or training.

While school leavers and recent grads should include a lot of detail here to make up for the lack of work experience, experienced candidates may benefit from a shorter education section, as your work experience section will be more important to recruiters.

 

Hobbies and interests

Although this is an optional section, it can be useful if your hobbies and interests will add further depth to your CV.

Interests which are related to the sector you are applying to, or which show transferable skills like leadership or teamwork, can worth listing.

On the other hand, generic hobbies like “going out with friends” won’t add any value to your application, so are best left off your CV.

 

CV builder

 

Creating a strong Chartered Engineer CV requires a blend of punchy content, considered structure and format, and heavy tailoring.

By creating a punchy profile and core skills list, you’ll be able to hook recruiter’s attention and ensure your CV gets read.

Remember that research and relevance is the key to a good CV, so research your target roles before you start writing and pack your CV with relevant skills.

Best of luck with your next application!