Athlete CV example

You’re dedicated, physically fit and at the top of your game.

However, CV writing isn’t your forte – and why should it be, you’re a top athlete?

But if you need an impressive application to land your next gig, why not let us lead the way on this one with our step-by-step writing guide below.

We’ll also share an athlete CV example to help you create your own interview-winning application.

 

 

 

Athlete CV example

Athlete CV 1

Athlete CV 2

 

This example CV demonstrates how to structure and format your own Athlete CV, so that it can be easily digested by busy hiring managers, and quickly prove why you are suitable for the jobs you are applying to.

It also gives you a good idea of the type of skills, experience and qualifications that you need to be highlighting in your CV.

 

CV builder

 

Athlete CV format and structure

Your CV is the first impression you’ll make on anybody who reads it.

A disorganised, cluttered and barely-readable CV could seriously decrease your chances of landing interviews, so it’s essential to make sure yours is slick, professional and easy to navigate.

You can do this by using a clear structure and formatting your content with some savvy formatting techniques – check them out below:

 

How to write a CV

 

Tips for formatting your Athlete CV

  • Length: Recruiters will be immediately put off by lengthy CVs – with hundreds of applications to read through, they simply don’t have the time! Grabbing their attention with a short, snappy and highly relevant CV is far more likely to lead to success. Aim for two sides of A4 or less.
  • Readability: Recruiters appreciate CVs that they can quickly scan through without trouble. Ensure yours makes the cut by formatting your headings for attention (bold or coloured fonts should do the trick) and breaking up long paragraphs into smaller chunks or short, snappy bullet points.
  • Design & format: While it’s okay to add your own spin to your CV, avoid overdoing the design. If you go for something elaborate, you might end up frustrating recruiters who, above anything, value simplicity and clarity.
  • Photos: Don’t add profile photos to your CV unless you work in an industry or region which prefers to see them. Most employers in the UK will not need to see one.

 

Quick tip: Creating a professional CV style can be difficult and time-consuming when using Microsoft Word or Google Docs. To create a winning CV quickly, try our quick-and-easy CV Builder and use one of their eye-catching professional CV templates.

 

CV formatting tips

 

 

CV structure

When writing your CV, break up the content into the following key sections, to ensure it can be easily digested by busy recruiters and hiring managers:

  • Contact details – Always list these at the very top of your CV – you don’t want them to be missed!
  • Profile – An introductory paragraph, intended to grab recruiters attention and summarise your offering.
  • Work experience / career history – Working from your current role and working backwards, list your relevant work experience.
  • Education – Create a snappy summary of your education and qualifications.
  • Interest and hobbies – An optional section to document any hobbies that demonstrate transferable skills.

Now you understand the basic layout of a CV, here’s what you should include in each section of yours.

 

Contact Details

Contact details

 

Write your contact details in the top corner of your CV, so that they’re easy to find but don’t take up too much space.

You only need to list your basic details, such as:

  • Mobile number
  • Email address
  • Location – Don’t list your full address. Your town or city, such as ‘Norwich’ or ‘Coventry’ is perfect.
  • LinkedIn profile or portfolio URL – Remember to update these before listing them on an application.

 

Athlete CV Profile

Recruiters and hiring managers are busy, so it’s essential to catch their attention from the get-go.

A strong introductory profile (or personal statement, for junior candidates) at the top of the CV is the first thing they’ll read, so it’s a great chance to make an impression.

It should be a short but punchy summary of your key skills, relevant experience and accomplishments.

Ultimately, it should explain why you’re a great fit for the role you’re applying for and inspire recruiters to read the rest of your CV.

 

CV profile

 

How to write a good CV profile:

  • Make it short and sharp: Recruiters have piles of CVs to read through and limited time to dedicate to each, so it pays to showcase your abilities in as few words as possible. 3-4 lines is ideal.
  • Tailor it: No matter how much time you put into your CV profile, it won’t impress if it’s irrelevant to the role you’re applying for. Before you start writing, make a list of the skills, knowledge and experience your target employer is looking for. Then, make sure to mention them in your CV profile and throughout the rest of your application.
  • Don’t add an objective: Leave your career objectives or goals out of your profile. You only have limited space to work with, so they’re best suited to your cover letter.
  • Avoid generic phrases: If there’s one thing that’ll annoy a recruiter, it’s a clichè-packed CV. Focus on showcasing your hard skills, experience and the results you’ve gained in previous roles, which will impress recruiters far more.

 

Example CV profile for an Athlete

Award-winning Team GB Track Athlete with 12 years of national and international success in the 200m and 400m sprints. Proficient in video analysis, preventative injury training and Matheson’s sprinting technique. Recipient of the UKAA 2023 Sprinter of the Year Award and European Sprint Cup Gold Medallist. UK Athletics Level 3 Accredited Coach with over 5 years of coaching experience and a commitment to contributing to the broader athletic community. 

 

What to include in your Athlete CV profile?

  • Experience overview: To give employers an idea of your capabilities, show them your track record by giving an overview of the types of companies you have worked for in the past and the roles you have carried out for previous employers – but keep it high level and save the details for your experience section.
  • Targeted skills: Ensure that your profile highlights your key skills that are most relevant to your Athlete, and tailor them to match the specific job you are applying for. To do this, refer to the job description to closely align your skills with their requirements.
  • Important qualifications: If you have any qualifications which are highly relevant to Athlete jobs, then highlight them in your profile so that employers do not miss them.

 

Quick tip: If you are finding it difficult to write an attention-grabbing CV profile, choose from hundreds of pre-written profiles across all industries, and add one to your CV with one click in our quick-and-easy CV Builder. All profiles are written by recruitment experts and easily tailored to suit your unique skillset.

 

Core skills section

Next, you should create a bullet pointed list of your core skills, formatted into 2-3 columns.

Here, you should focus on including the most important skills or knowledge listed in the job advertisement.

This will instantly prove that you’re an ideal candidate, even if a recruiter only has time to briefly scan your CV.

 

Core skills section CV

 

Important skills for your Athlete CV

Physical Conditioning – Maintaining peak physical condition through rigorous training, strength conditioning, and endurance exercises.

Sporting Techniques – Mastering the specific technical skills of the sport, including accurate execution of techniques and strategies.

Nutritional Knowledge – Understanding sports nutrition for optimal performance and recovery, including meal planning and supplementation.

Injury Prevention and Recovery – Implementing practices to prevent injuries and following rehabilitation protocols to recover from injuries effectively.

Mental Toughness and Resilience – Developing mental strength to handle pressure, setbacks, and competitive environments with resilience.

Tactical Awareness – Understanding and applying tactical strategies specific to the sport, adapting to different competitive scenarios.

Teamwork and Collaboration – Working effectively with teammates and coaches, fostering a collaborative environment in team sports.

Flexibility and Agility Training – Enhancing flexibility and agility for improved performance and reduced injury risk.

Performance Analysis – Using video analysis and other tools to review and improve performance techniques and strategies.

Endurance and Stamina – Building stamina and endurance to maintain high-level performance throughout the duration of the sport or event.

 

Quick tip: Our quick-and-easy CV Builder has thousands of in-demand skills for all industries and professions, that can be added to your CV in seconds – This will save you time and ensure you get noticed by recruiters.

 

CV builder

 

Work experience

Next up is your work experience section, which is normally the longest part of your CV.

Start with your current (or most recent) job and work your way backwards through your experience.

Can’t fit all your roles? Allow more space for your recent career history and shorten down descriptions for your older roles.

 

CV work experience

 

Structuring each job

Lengthy, unbroken chunks of text is a recruiters worst nightmare, but your work experience section can easily end up looking like that if you are not careful.

To avoid this, use my tried-and-tested 3-step structure, as illustrated below:

 

Role descriptions

 

Outline

Start with a brief summary of your role as a whole, as well as the type of company you worked for.

 

Key responsibilities

Using easy-to-read bullet points, note down your day-to-day responsibilities in the role.

Make sure to showcase how you used your hard sector skills and knowledge.

 

Key achievements

Round up each role by listing 1-3 key achievements, accomplishments or results.

Wherever possible, quantify them using hard facts and figures, as this really helps to prove your value.

 

Sample job description for Athlete CV

Outline

Represent Team GB Athletics in international competitions and Olympic qualifiers, specializing in 200m and 400m sprints. Currently holding the title of the fastest 400m sprinter in the UK. PB (Personal Best): 200m – 21.5s, 400m – 46.8s.

Key Responsibilities

  • Work 1-2-1 with a sports psychologist to improve mental approach
  • Conduct preventative injury therapy, identifying and treating current injuries with support from the team physio
  • Motivate and support other members of the team and junior athletes
  • Plan and run training sessions and seminars for the junior division

 

Quick tip: Create impressive job descriptions easily in our quick-and-easy CV Builder by adding pre-written job phrases for every industry and career stage.

 

 

Education section

Next up, you should list your education and qualifications.

This can include your formal qualifications (a degree, A-Levels and GCSEs), as well as sector-specific Athlete qualifications and/or training.

While school leavers and recent grads should include a lot of detail here to make up for the lack of work experience, experienced candidates may benefit from a shorter education section, as your work experience section will be more important to recruiters.

 

Hobbies and interests

Although this is an optional section, it can be useful if your hobbies and interests will add further depth to your CV.

Interests which are related to the sector you are applying to, or which show transferable skills like leadership or teamwork, can worth listing.

On the other hand, generic hobbies like “going out with friends” won’t add any value to your application, so are best left off your CV.

 

CV builder

 

Creating a strong Athlete CV requires a blend of punchy content, considered structure and format, and heavy tailoring.

By creating a punchy profile and core skills list, you’ll be able to hook recruiter’s attention and ensure your CV gets read.

Remember that research and relevance is the key to a good CV, so research your target roles before you start writing and pack your CV with relevant skills.

Best of luck with your next application!