Student Counsellor CV example

As a student counsellor, you’ll play a big role in providing care, a safe space and a way for students to discuss sensitive issues.

This is very important for their development and helping them reach their full potential. The trouble is, you can’t get passed the application stage.

Well, now it’s up to us to help you reach your full potential with our CV writing tips and student counsellor CV example below.

 

 

 

Student Counsellor CV example

Student Counsellor CV 1

Student Counsellor CV 2

 

This CV example demonstrates the type of info you should be including within your Student Counsellor CV, as well as how to format and layout the content in a way which looks professional and is easy for time-strapped recruiters to read.

This is the look and feel you should be aiming for, so remember to refer back to it throughout your CV writing process.

 

CV builder

 

Student Counsellor CV format and structure

In today’s fast-paced job market, recruiters and employers are often short on time. If they can’t locate the information they’re searching for within a few seconds, it could result in them overlooking your application.

To avoid this happening, it’s critical to structure and format your CV in a way that allows them to quickly identify your key skills and offerings, even when they’re pressed for time.

 

How to write a CV

 

Tips for formatting your Student Counsellor CV

  • Length: Two sides of A4 makes for the perfect CV length, though one page is okay for less experienced applicants. This forces you to make sure that every single sentence adds value to your CV and ensures you avoid unnecessary  info.
  • Readability: To help recruiters quickly skim through your CV, it’s important to format your section headings with bold or a different colour font and break up lengthy paragraphs into short sharp bullet points. This enables them to easily identify important information and assess your suitability.
  • Design & format: When it comes to CV design, it’s best to keep things simple and sleek. While elaborate designs certainly command attention, it’s not always for the right reasons! Readability is key, so whatever you choose to do, make sure you prioritise readability above everything.
  • Photos: Recruiters can’t factor in appearance, gender or race into the recruitment process, so a profile photo is not usually needed. However, creative employers do like to see them, so you can choose to include one if you think it will add value to your CV .

 

Quick tip: Creating a professional CV style can be difficult and time-consuming when using Microsoft Word or Google Docs. To create a winning CV quickly, try our quick-and-easy CV Builder and use one of their eye-catching professional CV templates.

 

CV formatting tips

 

 

CV structure

As you write your CV, work to the simple but effective structure below:

  • Name and contact details – Pop them at the top of your CV, so it’s easy for recruiters to contact you.
  • CV profile – Write a snappy overview of what makes you a good fit for the role; discussing your key experience, skills and accomplishments.
  • Core skills section – Add a short but snappy list of your relevant skills and knowledge.
  • Work experience – A list of your relevant work experience, starting with your current role.
  • Education – A summary of your relevant qualifications and professional/vocational training.
  • Hobbies and interests – An optional sections, which you could use to write a short description of any relevant hobbies or interests.

Now you understand the basic layout of a CV, here’s what you should include in each section of yours.

 

Contact Details

Contact details

 

Tuck your contact details into the corner of your CV, so that they don’t take up too much space.
Stick to the basic details, such as:

  • Mobile number
  • Email address – It should sound professional, such as your full name.
  • Location -Just write your rough location, rather than your full address.
  • LinkedIn profile or portfolio URL – If you include these, ensure they’re sleek, professional and up-to-date.

 

Student Counsellor CV Profile

Your CV profile (or personal statement, if you’re an entry-level applicant) provides a brief overview of your skills, abilities and suitability for a position.

It’s ideal for busy recruiters and hiring managers, who don’t want to waste time reading unsuitable applications.

Think of it as your personal sales pitch. You’ve got just a few lines to sell yourself and prove you’re a great match for the job – make it count!

 

CV profile

 

How to write a good CV profile:

  • Make it short and sharp: The best CV profiles are short, sharp and highly relevant to the target role. For this reason, it’s best to write 3-4 lines of high-level information, as anything over might be missed.
  • Tailor it: The biggest CV mistake? A generic, mass-produced document which is sent out to tens of employers. If you want to land an interview, you need to tailor your CV profile (and your application as a whole) to the specific roles you’re applying for. So, before you start writing, remember to read over those job descriptions and make a list of the skills, knowledge and experience the employers are looking for.
  • Don’t add an objective: Avoid discussing your career goals in your CV profile – if you think they’re necessary, briefly mention them in your cover letter instead.
  • Avoid generic phrases: If your CV is riddled with clichès like “Dynamic thought-leader”, hit that delete button. Phrases like these are like a broken record to recruiters, who read them countless times per day. Hard facts, skills, knowledge and results are sure to yield far better results.

 

Example CV profile for Student Counsellor

BACP-Certified Therapist with a progressive 12-year journey in fostering positive growth and well-being to students in school and further education settings. Proficient in implementing an array of therapeutic modalities from Solution-Focused Brief Therapy to Cognitive Behavioural Techniques, facilitating transformative student experiences. Published academic in reputable mental health journals, adept at fostering profound therapeutic relationships.

 

What to include in your Student Counsellor CV profile?

  • Experience overview: Start with a brief summary of your relevant experience so far. How many years experience do you have? What type of companies have you worked for? What industries/sectors have you worked in? What are your specialisms?
  • Targeted skills: Make your most relevant Student Counsellor key skills clear in your profile. These should be tailored to the specific role you’re applying for – so make sure to check the job description first, and aim to match their requirements as closely as you can.
  • Important qualifications: If the jobs you are applying to require candidates to have certain qualifications, then you must add them in your profile to ensure they are seen by hiring managers.

 

Quick tip: If you are finding it difficult to write an attention-grabbing CV profile, choose from hundreds of pre-written profiles across all industries, and add one to your CV with one click in our quick-and-easy CV Builder. All profiles are written by recruitment experts and easily tailored to suit your unique skillset.

 

Core skills section

Create a core skills section underneath your profile to spotlight your most in-demand skills and grab the attention of readers.

This section should feature 2-3 columns of bullet points that emphasise your applicable skills for your target jobs. Before constructing this section, review the job description and compile a list of any specific skills, specialisms, or knowledge required.

 

Core skills section CV

 

Important skills for your Student Counsellor CV

Counselling Techniques – Proficiency in various counselling methodologies and techniques, such as cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT), person-centred therapy, and solution-focused therapy, to provide effective guidance to students.

Assessment and Evaluation – Conducting assessments and evaluations of students’ mental health, emotional well-being, and personal challenges to develop tailored counselling plans.

Active Listening – Actively listening and empathising with students, creating a safe and non-judgmental space for them to express their concerns and feelings.

Crisis Intervention – Handling crisis situations, including suicide prevention, self-harm, and severe emotional distress, with the knowledge of appropriate crisis intervention strategies.

Ethical Guidelines – Maintaining an awareness of ethical guidelines and standards of practice in counselling, ensuring confidentiality, informed consent, and ethical decision-making.

Mental Health Knowledge – Maintaining a deep understanding of mental health disorders, their symptoms, and treatment options to provide informed guidance and referrals to mental health professionals.

Cross-Cultural Competence – Working with students from diverse cultural backgrounds, respecting and addressing cultural sensitivities and differences in counselling.

Substance Abuse Counselling – Addressing substance abuse issues, including addiction assessment, prevention, and referral to addiction treatment programs when necessary.

Conflict Resolution – Mediating and resolving conflicts among students, helping them develop effective communication and problem-solving skills.

Documentation and Record-Keeping – Maintaining accurate and confidential records of counselling sessions, progress notes, and student information in compliance with data protection laws.

 

Quick tip: Our quick-and-easy CV Builder has thousands of in-demand skills for all industries and professions, that can be added to your CV in seconds – This will save you time and ensure you get noticed by recruiters.

 

CV builder

 

Work experience

Now that recruiters have a good overview of your skills and abilities, you need to jump into the detail of your career history.

Give them a more thorough insight into what you can do by creating a detailed list of your relevant experience.

Start with your current role, and work backwards through all the relevant positions you’ve held.
This could be freelance, contract or voluntary work too; as long as it’s related to the role you’re applying for.

 
Work experience
 

Structuring each job

The structure of your work experience section can seriously affect its impact.

This is generally the biggest section of a CV, and with no thought to structure, it can look bulky and important information can get lost.

Use my 3-step structure below to allow for easy navigation, so employers can find what they are looking for:

 
Role descriptions
 

Outline

Start with a 1-2 sentence summary of your role as a whole, detailing what the goal of your position was, who you reported to or managed, and the type of organisation you worked for.

 

Key responsibilities

Next up, you should write a short list of your day-to-day duties within the job.

Recruiters are most interested in your sector-specific skills and knowledge, so highlight these wherever possible.

 

Key achievements

Round up each role by listing 1-3 key achievements, accomplishments or results.

Wherever possible, quantify them using hard facts and figures, as this really helps to prove your value.

 

Sample job description for Student Counsellor CV

Outline

Work as part of the counselling team at Newcastle University, delivering comprehensive support and mental health interventions to empower students in their academic and personal journeys.

Key Responsibilities

  • Skilfully tailor mindfulness-based interventions and incorporate creative arts therapies
  • Lead dynamic group therapy sessions focusing on resilience-building and emotional regulation
  • Employ a Solution-Focused Approach to guide students in setting and attaining academic and personal goals
  • Implement CBT techniques to address anxiety and performance-related stress, enhancing student well-being

 

Quick tip: Create impressive job descriptions easily in our quick-and-easy CV Builder by adding pre-written job phrases for every industry and career stage.

 

 

Education section

At the bottom of your CV is your full education section. You can list your formal academic qualifications, such as:

  • Degree
  • GCSE’s
  • A levels

As well as any specific Student Counsellor qualifications that are essential to the jobs you are applying for. Note down the name of the qualification, the organisation at which you studied, and the date of completion.

 

Hobbies and interests

This section is entirely optional, so you’ll have to use your own judgement to figure out if it’s worth including.

If your hobbies and interests could make you appear more suitable for your dream job, then they are definitely worth adding.

Interests which are related to the industry, or hobbies like sports teams or volunteering, which display valuable transferable skills might be worth including.

 

CV builder

An interview-winning CV for a Student Counsellor role, needs to be both visually pleasing and packed with targeted content.

Whilst it needs to detail your experience, accomplishments and relevant skills, it also needs to be as clear and easy to read as possible.

Remember to research the role and review the job ad before applying, so you’re able to match yourself up to the requirements.

If you follow these guidelines and keep motivated in your job search, you should land an interview in no time.

Best of luck with your next application!