Medical Assistant CV example

As a medical assistant, you’re the backbone of any healthcare team, providing essential support to ensure patient care runs smoothly.

Crafting a standout CV is crucial to demonstrate your skills and experiences to potential employers in the medical field.

To guide you through the process, here’s a friendly Medical Assistant CV example, complete with our top writing tips.

 

 

 

Medical Assistant CV example

Medical Assistant CV 1

Medical Assistant CV 2

 

This is a good example of a Medical Assistant CV which is professionally formatted, and structured in a way that allows recruiters to easily find and understand the candidate’s key selling points.

Take some time to look at this CV and refer to it throughout the writing of your own CV for best results.

 

CV builder

 

Medical Assistant CV format and structure

In a highly competitive job market, recruiters and employers are often inundated with applications. If they can’t find what they’re looking for in your CV quickly, they may skip past your application and move on to the next one in their inbox

So, it’s crucial to structure and format your CV in a way that enables them to find your essential details with ease, even if they’re pressed for time.

 

How to write a CV

 

Tips for formatting your Medical Assistant CV

  • Length: It’s essential to keep your CV concise, regardless of whether you have one year or thirty years of experience. Recruiters are frequently managing multiple roles and responsibilities and do not have the luxury of reading lengthy CVs. Therefore, limit your CV to two sides of A4. If you have little industry experience, one page is sufficient.
  • Readability: By formatting your section headings with bold or a different colour font and using bullet points to break up large blocks of text, you can help busy recruiters quickly scan through your CV. This makes it easier for them to find important details without wasting time.
  • Design & format: Your CV needs to look professional, sleek and easy to read. A subtle colour palette, clear font and simple design are generally best for this, as fancy designs are often harder to navigate.
  • Photos: Profile photos or aren’t a requirement for most industries, so you don’t need to add one in the UK – but if you do, just make sure it looks professional

 

Quick tip: Creating a professional CV style can be difficult and time-consuming when using Microsoft Word or Google Docs. To create a winning CV quickly, try our quick-and-easy CV Builder and use one of our eye-catching professional CV templates.

 

CV formatting tips

 

 

CV structure

When writing your CV, it’s important to structure the content into the following key sections to ensure easy digestion by busy recruiters and hiring managers:

  • Contact details: List your contact details at the top of your CV to prevent them from being overlooked.
  • Profile: Begin with an introductory paragraph that captures recruiters’ attention and summarises what you have to offer employers.
  • Work experience/career history: List your relevant work experience in reverse chronological order, starting with your current position.
  • Education: Provide a brief summary of your education and qualifications.
  • Interests and hobbies: An optional section to showcase any hobbies that highlight transferable skills relevant to your target jobs.

Now you understand the basic layout of a CV, here’s what you should include in each section of yours.

 

Contact Details

Contact details

 

Kick-start your CV with your contact details, so recruiters can get in touch easily.
Here’s what you should include:

  • Mobile number
  • Email address – Make sure it’s professional, with no silly nicknames.
  • Location – Your town or city is sufficient, rather than a full address.
  • LinkedIn profile or portfolio URL – Ensure they’ve been updated and are looking slick and professional.

Quick tip: Avoid listing your date of birth, marital status or other irrelevant details – they’re unnecessary at this stage.

 

Medical Assistant CV Profile

Recruiters and hiring managers are busy, so it’s essential to catch their attention from the get-go.

A strong introductory profile (or personal statement, for junior candidates) at the top of the CV is the first thing they’ll read, so it’s a great chance to make an impression.

It should be a short but punchy summary of your key skills, relevant experience and accomplishments.

Ultimately, it should explain why you’re a great fit for the role you’re applying for and inspire recruiters to read the rest of your CV.

 

CV profile

 

How to write a good CV profile:

  • Make it short and sharp: It might be tempting to submit a page-long CV profile, but recruiters won’t have the time to read it. To ensure every word gets read, it’s best to include high-level information only; sticking to a length of 3-5 lines.
  • Tailor it: The biggest CV mistake? A generic, mass-produced document which is sent out to tens of employers. If you want to land an interview, you need to tailor your CV profile (and your application as a whole) to the specific roles you’re applying for. So, before you start writing, remember to read over those job descriptions and make a list of the skills, knowledge and experience the employers are looking for.
  • Don’t add an objective: Want to talk about your career goals and objectives? While the profile may seem like a good space to do so, they’re actually much better suited to your cover letter.
  • Avoid generic phrases: If your CV is riddled with clichès like “Dynamic thought-leader”, hit that delete button. Phrases like these are like a broken record to recruiters, who read them countless times per day. Hard facts, skills, knowledge and results are sure to yield far better results.

 

Example CV profile for Medical Assistant

Empathetic Medical Assistant with 3+ years of experience in offering clerical and clinical support in private and public hospital environments. Strong comprehension of dosage calculations, correct storage, and potential side effects of commonly used pain relievers, tropical meds, eye and ear drops, subcutaneous injections, and nasal sprays under supervision. Focused on engaging in ongoing training and professional development to stay updated on healthcare protocols and regulations.

 

What to include in your Medical Assistant CV profile?

  • Experience overview: Showcase your aptitude for the job you are aiming for by giving a brief summary of your past work history, including the industries you have worked in, the kinds of employers you have served, and the roles you have held.
  • Targeted skills: Ensure that your profile highlights your key skills that are most relevant to your Medical Assistant, and tailor them to match the specific job you are applying for. To do this, refer to the job description to closely align your skills with their requirements.
  • Important qualifications: If the jobs you are applying to require candidates to have certain qualifications, then you must add them in your profile to ensure they are seen by hiring managers.

 

Quick tip: If you are finding it difficult to write an attention-grabbing CV profile, choose from hundreds of pre-written profiles across all industries, and add one to your CV with one click in our quick-and-easy CV Builder. All profiles are written by recruitment experts and easily tailored to suit your unique skillset.

 

Core skills section

Create a core skills section underneath your profile to spotlight your most in-demand skills and grab the attention of readers.

This section should feature 2-3 columns of bullet points that emphasise your applicable skills for your target jobs. Before constructing this section, review the job description and compile a list of any specific skills, specialisms, or knowledge required.

 

Core skills section CV

 

Important skills for your Medical Assistant CV

Clinical Procedures – Performing basic clinical tasks such as taking vital signs, administering injections, and performing venipuncture for blood draws.

Patient Care – Providing assistance to patients with daily living activities, personal care, and mobility support in a clinical setting.

Medical Terminology – Utilising a comprehensive understanding of medical terminology to effectively communicate with healthcare professionals and understand patient records.

Phlebotomy – Skilled in the practice of phlebotomy, ensuring safe and hygienic drawing of blood samples for laboratory testing.

Electrocardiography (ECG) – Conducting and interpreting ECGs to monitor and record electrical activity of the heart as part of patient diagnostic assessments.

Medical Billing – Processing and submitting medical claims to insurance companies, understanding coding systems, and managing patient billing inquiries.

Infection Control – Implementing infection control procedures to prevent the spread of infectious diseases within the healthcare environment.

Medical Record Management – Maintaining accurate and confidential patient records, both digitally and in paper form, ensuring compliance with legal requirements.

Diagnostic Testing – Preparing and conducting a variety of diagnostic tests, such as urinalysis and blood glucose monitoring, to assist in patient care.

Equipment Sterilization – Sterilizing medical instruments and equipment to ensure a safe and germ-free environment for patient care and surgical procedures.

 

Quick tip: Our quick-and-easy CV Builder has thousands of in-demand skills for all industries and professions, that can be added to your CV in seconds – This will save you time and ensure you get noticed by recruiters.

 

CV builder

 

Work experience

Next up is your work experience section, which is normally the longest part of your CV.

Start with your current (or most recent) job and work your way backwards through your experience.

Can’t fit all your roles? Allow more space for your recent career history and shorten down descriptions for your older roles.

 

CV work experience order

 

Structuring each job

The structure of your work experience section can seriously affect its impact.

This is generally the biggest section of a CV, and with no thought to structure, it can look bulky and important information can get lost.

Use my 3-step structure below to allow for easy navigation, so employers can find what they are looking for:

 

CV role descriptions

 

Outline

Start with a solid introduction to your role as a whole, in order to build some context.

Explain the nature of the organisation you worked for, the size of the team you were part of, who you reported to and what the overarching purpose of your job was.

 

Key responsibilities

Next up, you should write a short list of your day-to-day duties within the job.

Recruiters are most interested in your sector-specific skills and knowledge, so highlight these wherever possible.

 

Key achievements

Finish off by showcasing 1-3 key achievements made within the role.

This could be anything that had a positive effect on your company, clients or customers, such as saving time or money, receiving exemplary feedback or receiving an award.

 

Sample job description for Medical Assistant CV

Outline

Carry out a wide range of duties within the scope of practice, for a private equity-backed institution that enables doctors to be more laser-focused on improving the lives for men, women, and children.

Key Responsibilities

  • Greet service recipients, verify their personal and insurance information, and create/update their profiles.
  • Manage calendars by scheduling appointments, operations, and follow-up visits.
  • Escort sick or injured persons to examination rooms, and take vital signs such as BP, temperature, pulse, oxygen saturation, and weight.
  • Perform urinalyses and ECGs (electrocardiograms) and monitor glucose in haemoglobin for managing diabetes measure as directed.

 

Quick tip: Create impressive job descriptions easily in our quick-and-easy CV Builder by adding pre-written job phrases for every industry and career stage.

 

 

Education section

Next up, you should list your education and qualifications.

This can include your formal qualifications (a degree, A-Levels and GCSEs), as well as sector-specific Medical Assistant qualifications and/or training.

While school leavers and recent grads should include a lot of detail here to make up for the lack of work experience, experienced candidates may benefit from a shorter education section, as your work experience section will be more important to recruiters.

 

Hobbies and interests

The hobbies and interests CV section isn’t mandatory, so don’t worry if you’re out of room by this point.

However, if you have an interesting hobby, or an interest that could make you seem more suitable for the role, then certainly think about adding.

Be careful what you include though… Only consider hobbies that exhibit skills that are required for roles as a Medical Assistant, or transferable workplace skills.

There is never any need to tell employers that you like to watch TV and eat out.

 

CV builder

 

A strong, compelling CV is essential to get noticed and land interviews with the best employers.

To ensure your CV stands out from the competition, make sure to tailor it to your target role and pack it with sector-specific skills and results.

Remember to triple-check for spelling and grammar errors before hitting send.

Good luck with the job search!