Formulation Scientist CV example

Much like developing safe and effective drugs, writing a standout application is a science.

So, if you’re hoping to secure your next formulation position, you’ve come to the right place.

In the guide below, we’ll teach you how to write an engaging CV that’s going to secure you an interview. We’ll also share a formulation scientist CV example to inspire your own.

 

 

 

Formulation Scientist CV example

Formulation Scientist CV 1

Formulation Scientist CV 2

 

This CV example demonstrates the type of info you should be including within your Formulation Scientist CV, as well as how to format and layout the content in a way which looks professional and is easy for time-strapped recruiters to read.

This is the look and feel you should be aiming for, so remember to refer back to it throughout your CV writing process.

 

CV builder

 

Formulation Scientist CV format and structure

The format and structure of your CV is important because it will determine how easy it is for recruiters and employers to read your CV.

If they can find the information they need quickly, they’ll be happy; but if they struggle, your application could be overlooked.

A simple and logical structure will always create a better reading experience than a complex structure, and with a few simple formatting tricks, you’ll be good to go.

 

How to write a CV

 

Tips for formatting your Formulation Scientist CV

  • Length: If you want to hold the reader’s attention and ensure your CV isn’t yawn-worthy, it’s best to stick to two sides of A4 or less. This is more than enough room to highlight why you’re a good match for the role – anything more can quickly become tedious!
  • Readability: Make sure your CV is easy to read and looks professional by applying some simple formatting tricks. Bullet points are great for making large paragraphs more digestible, while formatting your headings with bold or coloured text will help the reader to find the information they need, with speed.
  • Design & format: The saying ‘less is more’ couldn’t be more applicable to CVs. Readability is key, so avoid overly complicated designs and graphics. A subtle colour palette and easy-to-read font is all you need!
  • Photos: Don’t add profile photos to your CV unless you work in an industry or region which prefers to see them. Most employers in the UK will not need to see one.

 

Quick tip: Creating a professional CV style can be difficult and time-consuming when using Microsoft Word or Google Docs. To create a winning CV quickly, try our quick-and-easy CV Builder and use one of their eye-catching professional CV templates.

 

CV formatting tips

 

 

CV structure

Divide your CV into the following major sections when writing it:

  • Name and contact details – Head your CV with your name and contact details, to let the reader know who you are and how to contact you.
  • CV profile – A brief paragraph which summarises your skills and experience and highlights why you’re a good match for the role.
  • Core skills list – A snappy, bullet-pointed list of your most relevant skills.
  • Work experience – A structured list of your work experience in reverse chronological order.
  • Education – A summary of any relevant qualifications or professional training you’ve completed.
  • Hobbies and interests – An optional section, which should only be used if your hobbies are relevant to the jobs you’re applying to.

 

Now you understand the basic layout of a CV, here’s what you should include in each section of yours.

 

Contact Details

Contact details

 

Tuck your contact details into the corner of your CV, so that they don’t take up too much space.
Stick to the basic details, such as:

  • Mobile number
  • Email address – It should sound professional, such as your full name.
  • Location -Just write your rough location, rather than your full address.
  • LinkedIn profile or portfolio URL – If you include these, ensure they’re sleek, professional and up-to-date.

 

Formulation Scientist CV Profile

Recruiters read through countless applications every day.

If they don’t find what they’re looking for quickly, they’ll simply move onto the next one.

That’s what makes your CV profile (or personal statement, if you’re an entry-level/graduate candidate) so important.

This short and snappy summary sits at the top of your CV, and should give a high-level overview of why you’re a good match for the job.

This way, you can ensure that busy recruiters see your suitability from the outset, and so, feel your CV is worth their time.

 

CV profile

 

How to write a good CV profile:

  • Make it short and sharp: Recruiters have piles of CVs to read through and limited time to dedicate to each, so it pays to showcase your abilities in as few words as possible. 3-4 lines is ideal.
  • Tailor it: Not tailoring your profile (and the rest of your CV) to the role you’re applying for, is the worst CV mistake you could make. Before setting pen to paper, look over the job ad and make a note of the skills and experience required. Then, incorporate your findings throughout.
  • Don’t add an objective: Want to talk about your career goals and objectives? While the profile may seem like a good space to do so, they’re actually much better suited to your cover letter.
  • Avoid generic phrases: Focus on fact, not fluff. Phrases like “Committed and enthusiastic thought-leader” and “Dynamic problem solver” might sound fancy, but they’ll do nothing for your application. Not only do they sound cheesy, but they have no substance – stick to real skills and facts

 

Example CV profile for Formulation Scientist

Experienced Formulation Scientist with over 10 years of experience in pharmaceutical development, specialising in generic drug formulation and vaccine development. Proficient in analytical chemistry, including DSC and FTIR, supported by a master’s degree in pharmaceuticals science. Committed to improving access to drugs by driving cost-effective practises and materials with demonstrated success in creating lipid-based formulations for traditionally expensive pharmaceuticals.

 

What to include in your Formulation Scientist CV profile?

  • Experience overview: Start with a brief summary of your relevant experience so far. How many years experience do you have? What type of companies have you worked for? What industries/sectors have you worked in? What are your specialisms?
  • Targeted skills: Employers need to know what skills you can bring to their organisation, and ideally they want to see skills that match their job vacancy. So, research your target roles thoroughly and add the most important Formulation Scientist skills to your profile.
  • Important qualifications: Be sure to outline your relevant Formulation Scientist qualifications, so that anyone reading the CV can instantly see you are qualified for the jobs you are applying to.

 

Quick tip: If you are finding it difficult to write an attention-grabbing CV profile, choose from hundreds of pre-written profiles across all industries, and add one to your CV with one click in our quick-and-easy CV Builder. All profiles are written by recruitment experts and easily tailored to suit your unique skillset.

 

Core skills section

Underneath your profile, write a core skills section to make your most relevant skills jump off the page at readers.

It should be made up of 2-3 columns of bullet points of your relevant skills.

Before you do this, look over the job description and make a list of any specific skills, specialisms or knowledge required.

Then, make sure to use your findings in your list. This will paint you as the perfect match for the role.

 

Core skills section CV

 

Important skills for your Formulation Scientist CV

Chemical Formulation – Creating and optimising chemical formulations for products such as pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, or industrial chemicals.

Materials Science – Understanding the properties of raw materials, including polymers, chemicals, and additives, and their interactions in formulations.

Analytical Chemistry – Using advanced analytical techniques and instruments to analyse and characterise formulations, including spectroscopy and chromatography.

Experimental Design – Designing and conducting experiments to develop new formulations, troubleshoot issues, and improve existing products.

Quality Control and Assurance – Establishing and maintaining quality control processes to ensure product consistency and meet regulatory standards.

Regulatory Compliance – Using knowledge of regulatory requirements to ensure that formulations comply with safety and labelling regulations.

Scale-Up and Manufacturing – Scaling up formulations for large-scale production and collaborating with manufacturing teams to ensure product consistency.

Patent Research – Conducting patent research to identify and avoid intellectual property issues when formulating new products.

Documentation and Reporting – Maintaining accurate records, writing technical reports, and communicating findings to internal teams and regulatory bodies.

Problem Resolution – Identifying and resolving formulation-related challenges, such as stability issues, product degradation, or ingredient compatibility.

 

Quick tip: Our quick-and-easy CV Builder has thousands of in-demand skills for all industries and professions, that can be added to your CV in seconds – This will save you time and ensure you get noticed by recruiters.

 

CV builder

 

Work experience

By this point, employers will be keen to know more detail about you career history.

Starting with your most recent role and working backwards, create a snappy list of any relevant roles you’ve held.

This could be freelance, voluntary, part-time or temporary jobs too. Anything that’s relevant to your target role is well-worth listing!

 
Work experience
 

Structuring each job

Your work experience section will be long, so it’s important to structure it in a way which helps recruiters to quickly and easily find the information they need.

Use the 3-step structure, shown in the below example, below to achieve this.

 
Role descriptions
 

Outline

Provide a brief overview of the job as a whole, such as what the overriding purpose of your job was and what type of company you worked for.

 

Key responsibilities

Next up, you should write a short list of your day-to-day duties within the job.

Recruiters are most interested in your sector-specific skills and knowledge, so highlight these wherever possible.

 

Key achievements

Round up each role by listing 1-3 key achievements, accomplishments or results.

Wherever possible, quantify them using hard facts and figures, as this really helps to prove your value.

 

Sample job description for Formulation Scientist CV

Outline

Collaborated within a multidisciplinary team at Grant Pharma, a leading pharmaceutical research organisation specialising in vaccines and oncology drug formulation and development.

Key Responsibilities

  • Lead the design and execution of pre-formulation studies and compatibility assessments to identify suitable excipients and drug delivery systems
  • Formulate and optimise complex parenteral dosage forms, including lipid-based formulations and lyophilised products, ensuring stability and sterility
  • Utilise advanced analytical techniques, such as DSC, FTIR, and SEM, for in-depth characterisation of drug substances and products
  • Develop robust pharmaceutical product specifications, conduct risk assessments, and drive quality-by-design (QbD) principles in drug formulation

 

Quick tip: Create impressive job descriptions easily in our quick-and-easy CV Builder by adding pre-written job phrases for every industry and career stage.

 

 

Education section

After your work experience, your education section should provide a detailed view of your academic background.

Begin with those most relevant to Formulation Scientist jobs, such as vocational training or degrees.
If you have space, you can also mention your academic qualifications, such as A-Levels and GCSEs.

Focus on the qualifications that are most relevant to the jobs you are applying for.

 

Hobbies and interests

The hobbies and interests CV section isn’t mandatory, so don’t worry if you’re out of room by this point.

However, if you have an interesting hobby, or an interest that could make you seem more suitable for the role, then certainly think about adding.

Be careful what you include though… Only consider hobbies that exhibit skills that are required for roles as a Formulation Scientist, or transferable workplace skills.

There is never any need to tell employers that you like to watch TV and eat out.

 

CV builder

 

Creating a strong Formulation Scientist CV requires a blend of punchy content, considered structure and format, and heavy tailoring.

By creating a punchy profile and core skills list, you’ll be able to hook recruiter’s attention and ensure your CV gets read.

Remember that research and relevance is the key to a good CV, so research your target roles before you start writing and pack your CV with relevant skills.

Best of luck with your next application!